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No 52 highest grossing Film in all time

Shrek the Third

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
Shrek the Third
Shrek the third ver2.jpg

Theatrical release poster
Directed by Chris Miller
Raman Hui
Produced by Aron Warner
Denise Nolan Cascino
Screenplay by Jeffrey Price
Peter S. Seaman
Chris Miller
Aron Warner
Story by Andrew Adamson
Based on Characters created 
by William Steig
Starring Mike Myers
Eddie Murphy
Cameron Diaz
Antonio Banderas
Julie Andrews
John Cleese
Music by Harry Gregson-Williams
Edited by Joyce Arrastia
Michael Andrews
Production
company
Distributed by Paramount Pictures1
Release dates
  • May 6, 2007 (Los Angeles)
  • May 18, 2007 (United States)
Running time
93 minutes
Country United States
Language English
Budget $160 million[1]
Box office $799 million[1]

Shrek the Third is a 2007 American computer-animated fantasy comedy film, and the third installment in the Shrek franchise. Like the first two Shrek films, the film is based on fairy tale themes. It was produced by DreamWorks Animation and is the first in the series to be distributed by Paramount Pictures1 which acquired DreamWorks Pictures in 2006 (the former parent of DWA). Chris Miller and Raman Hui directed the film, with the former also co-writing the screenplay with Jeffrey Price, Peter S. Seaman, and Aron Warner. Harry Gregson-Williams composed the original music for the film.

The story takes place eight months after the marriage of Shrek and Fiona in the first film.[2] Reluctantly reigning over the kingdom of Far, Far Away, Shrek sets out to find the next heir to the throne—Fiona’s cousin Artie, while Prince Charming is plotting to overthrow Shrek and become king. In addition to Mike Myers, Eddie Murphy, Cameron Diaz, Antonio Banderas, Rupert Everett,Julie Andrews, and John Cleese, who reprised their roles from Shrek 2, the film also features Justin Timberlake in the role of Arthur Pendragon and Eric Idle as Merlin.

The film premiered on May 6, 2007, at the Mann Village Theatre, Westwood in Los Angeles,[3] and was released in the United States theaters on May 18, 2007 (exactly six years after the first film). It was nominated for Best Animated Movie at the 2008 Kids’ Choice Awards, but lost to Ratatouille. It was also nominated for the BAFTA Award for Best Animated Film at the 61st British Academy Film Awards. It was the final film in the Shrek franchise to be produced by Pacific Data Images before its closure in 2015.[4]

The film grossed $799 million on a $160 million budget, becoming the fourth highest-grossing film of 2007. A sequel, titled Shrek Forever After was released in 2010.

Plot

Prince Charming vows that he will become King of Far, Far Away and avenge the death of his mother, the Fairy Godmother. Meanwhile, King Harold is dying and his ogre son-in-law Shrek and daughter Princess Fiona are to succeed him. Shrek, who is having difficulty serving as Regent during the King’s medical leave, insists that an ogre as king is a bad idea and that there must be someone else to rule the kingdom. Before dying, Harold tells Shrek of another heir: his nephew, Arthur Pendragon. Prince Charming goes to the Poison Apple tavern and persuades fairy tale villains to fight for their “happily ever after” by appealing to the defeats given in their stories.

Shrek, Donkey and Puss in Boots set out to retrieve Arthur; as they are sailing away, Fiona yells to Shrek that she is pregnant. The trio journey to Worcestershire Academy, an elite magical boarding school, where they discover Arthur or “Artie” is a scrawny 16-year-old underachiever picked on by everyone. At the school pep rally, Shrek tells Artie he is going to be king of Far Far Away. Artie is excited until Donkey and Puss inadvertently frighten him by discussing the responsibilities of being king. Artie tries taking control of the ship and crashes it on a remote island, where they meet Artie’s retired wizard teacher, Merlin.

Charming and the other villains attack the castle, but Wolfie, Pinocchio, Gingy, the Three Little Pigs and the Blind Mice stall them long enough for Fiona and her mother Queen Lilian to escape along with Snow White, Rapunzel, Cinderella, Sleeping Beauty and Doris the Ugly Stepsister. One of the Pigs accidentally blurts out that Shrek has gone to retrieve Arthur, and Prince Charming sends Captain Hook and his pirates to track down Shrek. The princesses are captured when Rapunzel betrays them because she loves Charming.

Captain Hook and his pirates track Shrek and his friends to Merlin’s island, where they attempt to capture Shrek alive and defeat the others. Shrek and Artie defeat the villains, and Hook mentions Charming and the takeover of Far Far Away. Concerned for his wife and future children, Shrek urges Artie to return to Worcestershire. Instead, Artie cons Merlin into using his magic to send them to Far Far Away. The spell works, but accidentally causes Puss and Donkey to switch bodies. They find Pinocchio and learn that Charming plans to defeat Shrek in a play. Charming’s men arrive, but Artie tricks the knights into not taking them into custody and they break into the castle during rehearsals for the play. Caught in Charming’s dressing room, the four are taken captive.

Charming prepares to defeat Artie, believing he is the next king. To save Artie’s life, Shrek tells Charming that Artie was a pawn to take his place as King of Far Far Away. Charming believes Shrek and allows Artie to leave. Donkey and Puss are imprisoned with Fiona and the princesses, where Fiona grows frustrated with their lack of initiative. Queen Lilian smashes the stone wall of the prison by head butting the walls. While the princesses launch a rescue mission for Shrek, Donkey and Puss free Gingy, Pinocchio, the wolf and pigs, Dragon and Donkey’s children. They encounter Artie, and Puss and Donkey explain that Shrek lied to save him.

Charming stages a musical in which he rescues Rapunzel. Just as Charming is about to defeat Shrek, Fiona, along with Puss, Donkey, the princesses and the fairy tale characters confront the villains. Artie convinces the villains that just because they are being treated like losers does not mean that they have to be losers.

Charming lunges at Artie with his sword, but Shrek blocks the blow, so Charming attacks him instead. Shrek, who seems fatally injured, informs Charming that he missed and that the Prince needs to keep looking for his own happily ever after, “cause I’m not giving up mine”. As Shrek pushes him aside, Dragon knocks over Rapunzel’s tower, defeating Charming. Shrek tells Artie the throne is his if he wants it, and Artie accepts. While the kingdom celebrates, Merlin restores Puss and Donkey to their proper bodies, accidentally switching their tails temporarily. Shrek returns to the swamp with Fiona, becoming the parents of ogre babies.

Cast

 
Mike Myers, Cameron Diaz, Antonio Banderas and Justin Timberlake at the film’s British premiere in London.

Production

Following the success of Shrek 2, a third and fourth Shrek movie, along with plans for a final, fifth film, were announced in May 2004 by Jeffrey Katzenberg: “Shrek 3 and 4 are going to reveal other unanswered questions and, finally, in the last chapter, we will understand how Shrek came to be in that swamp, when we meet him in the first movie.[5]

DreamWorks hired Peter Seaman and Jeffrey Price to write the film and Jon Zack, who wrote The Perfect Score, on board as a consultant.[6] Unlike the first two films, the film was not directed by Andrew Adamson.[7] In March 2006, Shrek the Third was announced as the title of the film.[8] Previously, the film was titled Shrek 3.

The film was originally going to be released in November 2006, however, in December 2004, the date was changed to May 2007; “The sheer magnitude of the Shrek franchise has led us to conclude that a May release date, with a DVD release around the holiday season, will enable us to best maximize performance and increase profitability, thereby generating enhanced asset value and better returns for our shareholders.” Katzenberg said.[9] The release date change was the day after Disney/Pixar changed the release date of Cars, from November 2005 to June 2006.[10]

 

Independence Day (1996 film)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
Independence Day
Independence day movieposter.jpg

Theatrical release poster
Directed by Roland Emmerich
Produced by Dean Devlin
Written by Dean Devlin
Roland Emmerich
Starring Will Smith
Bill Pullman
Jeff Goldblum
Mary McDonnell
Judd Hirsch
Margaret Colin
Randy Quaid
Robert Loggia
James Rebhorn
Harvey Fierstein
Vivica A. Fox
Music by David Arnold
Cinematography Karl Walter Lindenlaub
Edited by David Brenner
Production
company
Distributed by 20th Century Fox
Release dates
  • July 2, 1996
Running time
145 minutes
Country United States
Language English
Budget $75 million[1][2]
Box office $817.4 million[1]

Independence Day is a 1996 American epic science fiction disaster film co-written and directed by Roland Emmerich. The film stars Will Smith, Bill Pullman, Jeff Goldblum, Mary McDonnell, Judd Hirsch, Margaret Colin, Randy Quaid, Robert Loggia, James Rebhorn, Vivica A. Fox, and Harry Connick, Jr. The film focuses on a disparate group of people who converge in the Nevada desertin the aftermath of a destructive alien attack and, along with the rest of the human population, participate in a last-chance counterattack on July 4, the same date as the Independence Day holiday in the United States. The screenplay was written by Emmerich and producer Dean Devlin.

While promoting Stargate in Europe, Emmerich came up with the idea for the film when fielding a question about his own belief in the existence of alien life. He and Devlin decided to incorporate a large-scale attack when noticing that aliens in most invasion films travel long distances in outer space only to remain hidden when reaching Earth. Shooting began in July 1995 in New York City, and the film was officially completed on June 20, 1996.

The film was scheduled for release on July 3, 1996, but due to its high level of anticipation, many theaters began showing it on the evening of July 2, 1996, the same day the story of the film begins. The film grossed over $800 million worldwide, becoming the second-highest-grossing film at the time. It is currently the 51st-highest-grossing film of all time and was at the forefront of the large-scale disaster film and science fiction resurgences of the mid-to-late-1990s. The film received positive reviews upon its release, with critics mainly praising its groundbreaking special effects, musical score, and acting (particularly Smith’s performance), though some criticized its storyline and character development. It won the Academy Award for Best Visual Effects, while it was nominated for Best Sound Mixing. A sequel, Independence Day: Resurgence, is scheduled to be released on June 24, 2016.

Plot

On July 2, 1996,[3] a 500 km wide alien mothership enters Earth’s orbit and deploys 36 saucer-shaped “destroyer” spacecraft, each 15 miles (24 km) wide. As they take position over some of Earth’s major cities, David Levinson (Jeff Goldblum), an MIT graduate working for a cable company in New York City, discovers hidden transmissions in Earth’s satellites which he realizes is a timer counting down to a coordinated attack by the aliens. With the support of his estranged wife Constance Spano (Margaret Colin), the White House Communications Director, he and his father Julius (Judd Hirsch) gain entrance into the Oval Office to notify PresidentThomas J. Whitmore (Bill Pullman) about the attack. Whitmore orders large-scale evacuations of the targeted cities, but the aliens attack with advanced directed-energy weaponsbefore these can be carried out. Whitmore, portions of his staff, and the Levinsons narrowly escape aboard Air Force One as Washington, D.C. is destroyed.

On July 3, the Black Knights, a squadron of Marine Corps F/A-18 Hornets, participate in an assault on a destroyer near the ruins of Los Angeles. Their weapons fail to penetrate the craft’s force field. Dozens of “attacker” ships are launched by the aliens in defense, and a one-sided dogfight ensues in which nearly all the Hornets are destroyed. Afterwards, many American military installations, including NORAD, are destroyed, killing the Vice President and most of the Cabinet who had been hiding there. Captain Steven Hiller (Will Smith) is the only pilot to survive the Los Angeles assault by luring a single attacker to the Grand Canyon and causing their aircraft to crash into the desert. He subdues the injured alien and is rescued by Russell Casse (Randy Quaid), who is traveling across the desert with a group of refugees. They take the alien to nearby Area 51, where Whitmore and his remaining staff have also landed. Area 51 conceals a top-secret facility housing a repaired attacker and three alien bodies recovered from Roswell in 1947.

When scientist Dr. Brackish Okun (Brent Spiner) attempts to autopsy the alien, it regains consciousness and attempts to escape. When questioned by Whitmore, the alien attempts a psychic attack against him, but is killed by Whitmore’s security detail. Whitmore then mentions that while he was being attacked, he saw the alien’s thoughts; what its species is planning to do. They are like locusts; their entire species travel from planet to planet, destroying all life and harvesting the natural resources. Whitmore reluctantly orders a nuclear attack on the destroyers; a B-2 Spirit fires a nuclear missile at one of the destroyers above Houston, but the missile fails to penetrate the force field of the destroyer and the remaining strikes are aborted.

On July 4, Levinson devises a plan to use the repaired attacker to introduce a computer virus and plant a nuclear missile on board the mothership, theorizing that this will disrupt the force fields of the destroyers. Hiller volunteers to pilot the attacker, with Levinson accompanying him. With not enough military pilots to man all available aircraft, volunteers including Whitmore and Casse are enlisted for the counterstrike.

With the successful implantation of the virus, Whitmore leads the attack against an alien destroyer approaching Area 51. Although the force field is deactivated and the fighters are able to inflict damage, the hull of the destroyer is too big to inflict serious damage. As a result, the fighter’s supply of missiles quickly becomes exhausted. As the destroyer prepares to fire on the base, Casse has one missile left, but it jams. He decides to fly his plane directly into the alien weapon in a kamikaze attack, which kills him but destroys it. The Americans inform resistance forces around the world about how to destroy the alien ships. The nuclear device destroys the alien mothership as Hiller and Levinson escape unharmed back to Earth. The whole world then celebrates its heroes’ victory as well as its true ‘Independence Day’.

Cast

Production

 

F/A-18 Hornets of VMFA-314, “Black Knights”

The idea for the film came when Emmerich and Devlin were in Europe promoting their film Stargate. A reporter asked Emmerich why he made a film with content like Stargate if he did not believe in aliens. Emmerich stated he was still fascinated by the idea of an alien arrival, and further explained his response by asking the reporter to imagine what it would be like to wake up one morning and discover 15-mile-wide spaceships were hovering over the world’s largest cities. Emmerich then turned to Devlin and said, “I think I have an idea for our next film.”[7][15][16]

Emmerich and Devlin decided to expand on the idea by incorporating a large-scale attack, with Devlin saying he was bothered by the fact that “for the most part, in alien invasion movies, they come down to Earth and they’re hidden in some back field …[o]r they arrive in little spores and inject themselves into the back of someone’s head.”[17] Emmerich agreed by asking Devlin if arriving from across the galaxy, “would you hide on a farm or would you make a big entrance?”[17] The two wrote the script during a month-long vacation in Mexico,[15] and just one day after they sent it out for consideration, 20th Century Fox chairman Peter Chernin greenlit the screenplay.[11] Pre-production began just three days later in February 1995.[7][15] The U.S. military originally intended to provide personnel, vehicles, and costumes for the film; however, they backed out when the producers refused to remove the script’s Area 51 references.[7]

A then-record 3,000-plus special effects shots would ultimately be required for the film.[16] The shoot utilized on-set, in-camera special effects more often than computer-generated effects in an effort to save money and get more authentic pyrotechnic results.[7] Many of these shots were accomplished at Hughes Aircraft in Culver City, California, where the film’s art department, motion control photography teams, pyrotechnics team, and model shop were headquartered. The production’s model-making department built more than twice as many miniatures for the production than had ever been built for any film before by creating miniatures for buildings, city streets, aircraft, landmarks, and monuments.[18] The crew also built miniatures for several of the spaceships featured in the film, including a 30-foot (9.1 m) destroyer model[19] and a version of the mother ship spanning 12 feet (3.7 m).[20] City streets were recreated, then tilted upright beneath a high-speed camera mounted on a scaffolding filming downwards. An explosion would be ignited below the model, and flames would rise towards the camera, engulfing the tilted model and creating the rolling “wall of destruction” look seen in the film.[21] A model of theWhite House was also created, covering 10 feet (3.0 m) by 5 feet (1.5 m), and was used in forced-perspective shots before being destroyed in a similar fashion for its own destruction scene.[22] The detonation took a week to plan[11] and required 40 explosive charges.[22]

 

A World War II training aircraft with a camera mounted on its front navigated through the walls of the Little Colorado River canyon, and the footage was used as pilot point-of-view shots.[23]

The film’s aliens were designed by production designer Patrick Tatopoulos. The actual aliens of the film are diminutive and based on a design Tatopoulos drew when tasked by Emmerich to create an alien that was “both familiar and completely original”.[24] These creatures wear “bio-mechanical” suits that are based on another design Tatopoulos pitched to Emmerich. These suits were 8 feet (2.4 m) tall, equipped with 25 tentacles, and purposely designed to show it could not sustain a person inside so it would not appear to be a “man in a suit”.[25]

Principal photography began in July 1995 in New York City. A second unit gathered plate shots and establishing shots of Manhattan, Washington D.C., an RV community in Flagstaff, Arizona, and the Very Large Array on the Plains of San Agustin, New Mexico.[25] The main crew also filmed in nearby Cliffside Park, New Jersey before moving to the former Kaiser Steel mill in Fontana, California to film the post-attack Los Angeles sequences.[26] The production then moved to Wendover, Utah and West Wendover, Nevada,[27] where the deserts doubled for Imperial Valley and the Wendover Airport doubled for the El Toro and Area 51 exteriors.[28] It was here where Pullman filmed his pre-battle speech. Immediately before filming the scene, Devlin and Pullman decided to add “Today, we celebrate our Independence Day!” to the end of the speech. At the time, the production was nicknamed “ID4” because Warner Bros. owned the rights to the title Independence Day, and Devlin had hoped if Fox executives noticed the addition in dailies, the impact of the new dialogue would help them win the rights to the title.[7] The right to use the title was eventually won two weeks later.[11]

The production team moved to the Bonneville Salt Flats to film three scenes, then returned to California to film in various places around Los Angeles, including Hughes Aircraft where sets for the cable company and Area 51 interiors were constructed at a former aircraft plant. Sets for the latter included corridors containing windows that were covered with blue material. The filmmakers originally intended to use the chroma key technique to make it appear as if activity was happening on the other side of the glass; but thecomposited images were not added to the final print because production designers decided the blue panels gave the sets a “clinical look”.[29] The attacker hangar set contained an attacker mock-up 65 feet (20 m) wide[18] that took four months to build.[11] The White House interior sets used had already been built for The American President and had previously been used for Nixon.[22] Principal photography completed on November 3, 1995.[11]

The film originally depicted Russell Casse being rejected as a volunteer for the July 4 aerial counteroffensive because of his alcoholism. He then uses a stolen missile tied to his red biplane to carry out his suicide mission. According to Dean Devlin, test audiences responded well to the scene’s irony and comedic value.[7] However, the scene was re-shot to include Russell’s acceptance as a volunteer, his crash course in modern fighter aircraft, and him flying an F/A-18 instead of the biplane. Devlin preferred the alteration because the viewer now witnesses Russell ultimately making the decision to sacrifice his life,[7] and seeing the biplane keeping pace and flying amongst F/A-18s was “just not believable”.[30] The film was officially completed on June 20, 1996.[11]

Spider-Man (2002 film)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
Spider-Man
Spider-Man2002Poster.jpg

Theatrical release poster
Directed by Sam Raimi
Produced by
Screenplay by David Koepp
Based on The Amazing Spider-Man 
by Stan Lee
Steve Ditko
Starring
Music by Danny Elfman
Cinematography Don Burgess
Edited by
Production
company
Distributed by Columbia Pictures
Release dates
  • April 30, 2002 (Philippines)
  • May 3, 2002(North America)
Running time
121 minutes
Country United States
Language English
Budget $140 million
Box office $821.7 million[1]

Spider-Man is a 2002 American superhero film directed by Sam Raimi. Based on the Marvel Comics character of the same name, the film stars Tobey Maguire as Peter Parker, a high school student living in New York, who turns to crimefighting after developing spider-like super powers. Spider-Man also stars Willem Dafoe as Norman Osborn (a.k.a. the Green Goblin), Kirsten Dunst as Peter’s love interest Mary Jane Watson, and James Franco as his best friend Harry Osborn.

After being stuck in development hell for nearly 25 years, the film was licensed for a worldwide release by Sony Pictures Entertainment in 1999 after it acquired options from MGM on all previous scripts developed by Cannon Films, Carolco and New Cannon. Exercising its option on just two elements from this multi-script acquisition (a screenplay credited to James Cameron, Ted Newsom, John Brancato, Barney Cohen and “Joseph Goldman” (the pen name of Menahem Golan) and a later treatment credited solely to Cameron), Sony hired David Koepp to create a working screenplay from this “Cameron material”. Directors Roland Emmerich, Ang Lee, Chris Columbus, Jan de Bont, M. Night Shyamalan, Tony Scott and David Fincher were considered to direct the project before Raimi was hired as director in 2000. The Koepp script was rewritten by Scott Rosenberg during preproduction and received a dialogue polish from Alvin Sargent during production.

Filming of Spider-Man took place in Los Angeles, and New York City from January 8 to June 30, 2001. Spider-Man premiered in the Philippines on April 30, 2002, and had its general release in the United States on May 3, 2002. It became a critical and financial success. For its time, it was the only film to reach $100 million in its first weekend, had the largest opening weekend gross of all time, and was the most successful film based on a comic book. With $821.7 million worldwide, it was 2002’s third-highest-grossing film and is the 50th-highest-grossing film of all time (7th at the time of release).

The film was nominated at the 75th Academy Awards ceremony for Best Visual Effects and Best Sound Mixing. Due to the success of the film, Columbia Pictures and Marvel created two sequels, Spider-Man 2 on June 30, 2004, and Spider-Man 3 on May 4, 2007. A third sequel entered development in 2008 and was originally planned for a May 6, 2011 release date, but a disagreement between Raimi and Sony resulted in Raimi leaving the project and Sony canceling Spider-Man 4. Sony instead decided to reboot the series with The Amazing Spider-Man which was released on July 3, 2012. A sequel titled, The Amazing Spider-Man 2, was released in May 2, 2014. After the sequels and spin-offs to The Amazing Spider-Man were canceled, a new trilogy will take place in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, with Spider-Man set to make his debut in Captain America: Civil War, which would be released on May 6, 2016, followed by a solo film set to be released on July 28, 2017.

Plot

High-school senior Peter Parker visits a genetics laboratory with his friend Harry Osborn and love interest, Mary Jane Watson for a school field trip. There, Peter is bitten on the hand by a genetically engineered “super spider”. Shortly after arriving home to his Aunt May and Uncle Ben, he goes unconscious. Meanwhile, Harry’s father, scientist Norman Osborn, owner of Oscorp, is attempting to preserve his company’s critically important military contract. He experiments on himself with a new but unstable performance-enhancing chemical vapor that increases his speed, strength, and stamina. However, it also drives him insane and he kills his assistant, Mendel Stromm. The next morning, Peter finds that his previously impaired vision has improved and his body has metamorphosized into a more muscular physique. At school, he finds that his body can produce webs and his quickened reflexes let him avoid injury during a confrontation with Flash Thompson. Peter discovers he has developed superhuman speed, strength, the ability to stick to surfaces, and a heightened ability to sense danger.

Brushing off Uncle Ben’s advice that “With great power comes great responsibility,” Peter enters a wrestling tournament to receive money, purchase a car, and impress Mary Jane. He wins his match, but the promoter cheats him out of contest money. When a thief steals money from the promoter, Peter allows the thief to escape. He later discovers that Uncle Ben has been carjacked and shot dead. Peter confronts the carjacker, only to realize it was the same thief he let escape. After Peter disarms him, the fleeing carjacker falls out a window and dies. Meanwhile, Norman Osborn kills several scientists and the military’s General Slocum.

Upon graduating, Peter begins using his abilities to fight injustice, donning a costume and the persona of Spider-Man. J. Jonah Jameson, a newspaper company headmaster, hires Peter as a freelance photographer, since he is the only person providing clear images of Spider-Man.

Norman, upon learning Oscorp’s board members plan to sell the company, assassinates them at the World Unity Fair. Jameson quickly dubs the mysterious killer the Green Goblin. The Goblin offers Spider-Man a place at his side, but Spider-Man refuses. At the Osborn and Parkers’ Thanksgiving dinner, Norman deduces Spider-Man’s true identity after noticing a cut on Peter’s arm which he saw on Spider-Man; the Green Goblin subsequently attacks and hospitalizes Aunt May.

Mary Jane admits she has a crush on Spider-Man, who has rescued her on numerous occasions, and asks Peter whether Spider-Man ever asked about her. Harry, who loves Mary Jane, arrives and learns she has feelings for Peter. Devastated, Harry tells his father that Peter loves Mary Jane, unintentionally revealing Spider-Man’s biggest weakness.

The Goblin holds Mary Jane and a Roosevelt Island Tram car full of children hostage alongside the Queensboro Bridge. He forces Spider-Man to choose who he wants to save, and drops Mary Jane and the children. Spider-Man manages to save both Mary Jane and the tram car, while the Goblin is pelted by civilians showing loyalty to Spider-Man. The Goblin then grabs Spider-Man and throws him into an abandoned building where they battle. When the Goblin boasts about how he will later kill Mary Jane, an enraged Spider-Man overpowers the Goblin.

Norman regains control of his sanity and reveals himself to Spider-Man. He begs for forgiveness, but his Goblin persona attempts to remote-control his glider to impale Spider-Man from behind. Spider-Man dodges the attack, causing the glider to accidentally impale Norman instead. As he dies, Norman tells Peter not to tell Harry about the Green Goblin. Spider-Man takes Norman’s body back to Norman’s house and hides the Green Goblin’s equipment. At Norman’s funeral, Harry seeks vengeance toward Spider-Man, believing he is responsible for killing his father, and asserts that Peter is all the family he has left. Mary Jane confesses to Peter that she is in love with him, but Peter, feeling that he must protect her from the unwanted attentions of Spider-Man’s enemies, hides his true feelings and tells her that they can only be friends. As Peter leaves the funeral, he recalls Ben’s words about responsibility, and accepts his new life as Spider-Man.

Cast

“I felt like I was an outsider. I think what happened to me made me develop this street sense of watching people and working out what made them tick, wondering whether I could trust them or not. I went to a lot of schools along the coast in California, made few friends and stayed with aunts, uncles and grandparents while my folks tried to make ends meet. It was tough. We had no money.”
— Tobey Maguire on identifying with Peter Parker.[2]
  • Tobey Maguire as Peter Parker / Spider-Man:
    Peter is an academically brilliant but socially inept boy who is bitten by a genetically modified spider and gains spider-like abilities. Maguire was cast as Peter in July 2000,[3] having been Sam Raimi‘s primary choice for the role after he saw The Cider House Rules.[4] The studio was initially hesitant to cast someone who did not seem to fit the ranks of “adrenaline-pumping, tail-kicking titans”,[3] but Maguire managed to impress studio executives with his audition. The actor was signed for a deal in the range of $3 to $4 million with higher salary options for two sequels.[3] To prepare, Maguire was trained by a physical trainer, a yoga instructor, a martial arts expert, and a climbing expert, taking several months to improve his physique.[5] Maguire studied spiders and worked with a wire man to simulate the arachnidlike motion, and had a special diet.[6]
The studio had expressed interest in actors Leonardo DiCaprio, Edward Furlong and Freddie Prinze, Jr,[7] Chris Klein, Wes Bentley, and Heath Ledger.[8] Edward Furlong had been considered by James Cameron for the role in 1996,[9] while Raimi joked of Prinze that “[he] won’t even be allowed to buy a ticket to see this film.”[8] In addition, actorsScott Speedman, Jay Rodan, and James Franco were involved in screen tests for the lead role with Franco later being cast as Harry Osborn.[10]
  • Willem Dafoe as Norman Osborn / Green Goblin:
    Founder, Owner and CEO of Oscorp who tests an unstable strength enhancer on himself and becomes the insane and powerful Green Goblin. Unaware of Spider-Man’s true identity, he also sees himself as a father figure for Peter, ignoring his own son, Harry. Dafoe was cast as Osborn in November 2000,[11] after Nicolas Cage, John Malkovich, and John Travolta turned down the role.[12][13] Dafoe insisted on wearing the uncomfortable costume as he felt that a stuntman would not convey the character’s necessary body language. The 580-piece suit took half an hour to put on.[8]
  • Kirsten Dunst as Mary Jane Watson:
    The girl whom Peter Parker has developed a crush since he was six years old. Mary Jane has an abusive father, and aspires to become an actress, but becomes a waitress at a run down diner, a fact she hides from her boyfriend, Harry. Before Raimi cast Dunst, he had expressed his interest in casting Alicia Witt.[14] Dunst decided to audition after learning Maguire had been cast, feeling the film would have a more independent feel.[15] Dunst earned the role a month before shooting in an audition in Berlin.[8]
  • James Franco as Harry Osborn:
    Before being cast as Peter’s best friend and flatmate, Franco had screen tested for Spider-Man himself.[16]
  • Cliff Robertson as Ben Parker:
    May Parker’s husband and Peter Parker’s uncle, a fired electrician who is trying to find a new job. He is killed by a carjacker whom Peter failed to stop, and leaves Peter with the message, “With great power comes great responsibility.”
  • Rosemary Harris as May Parker:
    Ben Parker’s wife and Peter Parker’s aunt who is supportive of Peter’s love for Mary Jane.
  • J. K. Simmons as J. Jonah Jameson:
    The grouchy publisher of the Daily Bugle who despises Spider-Man. Nonetheless, he has a good side and pays Peter for photos of Spider-Man, and refuses to tell the Green Goblin the identity of the photographer.
  • Joe Manganiello as Eugene “Flash” Thompson:
    A repugnant high school bully who bullies Peter, and is defeated in a fight after Peter inherits his spider powers.
  • Bill Nunn as Joseph “Robbie” Robertson:
    The kindly editor at the Daily Bugle, who on occasion helps Peter.
  • Michael Papajohn as the Carjacker:
    The criminal who robs the wrestling manager who refuses to pay Peter Parker for his ring performance and later murders Ben Parker when he carjacks him in the course of his escape. He is killed in a fall from a window when confronted by Peter.
  • Elizabeth Banks as Betty Brant:
    As seen in past Spider-Man comics, Betty Brant is Jameson’s secretary who has a bit of a soft spot for Peter.
  • Ron Perkins as Dr. Stromm:
    A scientist employed by Oscorp that assists Norman Osborn in developing the Human Performance Enhancers that eventually transforms Osborn in the Green Goblin.

Bruce Campbell, a long-time colleague of director Sam Raimi, has a cameo as the announcer at the wrestling ring Peter takes part in. Ted Raimi, Sam Raimi’s actor brother, plays a small role as editor’s assistant “Hoffman”. Sam Raimi himself appeared off-screen, throwing popcorn at Peter as he enters the arena to wrestle Bonesaw McGraw (played by former professional wrestler “Macho Man” Randy Savage).[17] Spider-Man co-creator Stan Lee also has a cameo, in which he asks Peter, “Hey kid, would you like a pair of these glasses? They’re the kind they wore in X-Men.” The scene was cut, and Lee only briefly appears in the film to grab a young girl from falling debris during the battle between Spider-Man and the Green Goblin in Times Square. R&B/soul singer Macy Gray appears as herself. Lucy Lawless, star of Xena: Warrior Princess (produced by Raimi), also appears as a punk rock girl. One of the stunt performers in the film is actor Johnny Tri Nguyen.[4] Octavia Spencer has a brief appearance as the check-in girl who signs Peter Parker into the wrestling match and warns him that they are not liable for the injuries he will sustain. Robert Kerman, best known for his performances in pornographic and exploitation films, has a bit part as a tugboat captain.

No 47 highest grossing Film in all time

Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen
The faces of two robots stand atop a pyramid. A helicopter flies over an industrial facility on the right side of the image, and a young couple is seen in front of the pyramid. The film title and credits are on the bottom of the poster.

Theatrical release poster
Directed by Michael Bay
Produced by
Written by
Based on Transformers 
by Hasbro
Starring
Music by Steve Jablonsky
Cinematography Ben Seresin
Edited by
Production
company
Distributed by Paramount Pictures
Release dates
  • June 19, 2009(United Kingdom)
  • June 24, 2009(United States)
Running time
150 minutes[1]
Country United States
Language English
Budget $200 million
Box office $836.3 million[2]

Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen (also known as Transformers 2), is a 2009 American science fiction action film directed byMichael Bay and executive produced by Steven Spielberg. It is a sequel to 2007’s Transformers and the second installment in thelive-action Transformers series taking place two years after Transformers. The plot revolves around Sam Witwicky, who is caught in the war between two factions of alien robots, the Autobots and the Decepticons. Sam is having strange visions of Cybertronian symbols, and being hunted by the Decepticons under the orders of an ancient Decepticon named The Fallen, who seeks to get revenge on Earth by finding and activating a machine that would provide the Decepticons with an energon source, destroying the sun and all life on Earth in the process. This is the first film to feature the largest cast and Transformers, including the Constructicons for the first time in the series. Returning Transformers includes Optimus Prime, Bumblebee, Ironhide, Ratchet, Megatron, Starscream, Bonecrusher and Scorponok.

With deadlines jeopardized by possible strikes by the Directors Guild of America and the Screen Actors Guild, Bay managed to finish the production on time with the help of previsualization and a scriptment by his writers Roberto Orci, Alex Kurtzman, and series newcomer Ehren Kruger. Shooting took place from May to November 2008, with locations in Egypt, Jordan, BethlehemPennsylvania, New Jersey, and California, as well as air bases in New Mexico and Arizona.

Revenge of the Fallen was released on June 24, 2009. The film grossed a total of $402.1 million in North America and $434.2 million in other territories, for a total of $836.3 million worldwide. It was the second highest grossing film of 2009 in North America,18th domestically, the 43rd highest-grossing film of all time and fourth highest of the year worldwide. With over 11 million home media sales in 2009, it was also the top-selling film of the year in the United States.

Metacritic said the film received “generally unfavorable reviews”.[3] The film won three Razzie awards and became the highest-grossing film to win Worst Picture at the 30th Golden Raspberry Awards ceremony. This was the last film in the series to star Megan Fox, and was also the last film in the series to be distributed by DreamWorks Pictures, leaving Paramount Pictures to become the distributor of its future films.

A third film, Transformers: Dark of the Moon, was released on June 29, 2011. A fourth film, Transformers: Age of Extinction, was released on June 27, 2014. A fifth film as of now titled Transformers 5 is scheduled for a 2017 release.

Plot

In 17,000 B.C., the Seven Primes traveled the galaxy to create Energon with star-absorbing machines called Sun Harvesters. The Primes followed a rule in which to never destroy planets with life, but one of them, later called The Fallen, deceives the others by building an army and sets up a Sun Harvester on Earth. After defeating ancient humans, the Primes defeat and imprison The Fallen before he can harvest Earth’s sun with the Matrix of Leadership, as well as sacrificing themselves to hide the Matrix.

Two years after Megatron‘s demise, the Autobots join the U.S. military to form the Non-Biological Extraterrestrial Species Treaty (NEST), a classified task force hunting down surviving Decepticons, led by William Lennox and Rob Epps. During a mission in Shanghai (against Decepticons Sideways and Scavenger), Optimus Prime learns of The Fallen’s return, but is unfamiliar with the name. National Security Adviser Theodore Galloway scolds the task force for their destructive tactics, reminding them that Megatron’s corpse is still in the Laurentian Abyss and the last known AllSpark shard is locked up in NEST’s headquarters. The Decepticon Communications Officer Soundwave hacks into a U.S. military satellite, eavesdropping for information and sends Ravage to retrieve the shard.

Meanwhile, Sam Witwicky prepares to attend college, leaving his girlfriend Mikaela Banes and guardian Bumblebee behind. While preparing for college, he gets a call from Mikaela. While on the phone, he removes an old jacket from his cupboard; a smaller AllSpark shard falls from within it. He picks up the shard, accidentally channeling its knowledge into his mind, causing him to see Cybertronian symbols and bringing the kitchen appliances to life. After Bumblebee destroys them, Sam gives the shard to Mikaela, who later captures the Decepticon Wheelie when he tries to steal it. The Decepticons resurrect Megatron by using the shard retrieved by Ravage. Megatron then flies to a moon of Saturn and reunites with his master, The Fallen. The Fallen orders Megatron to capture Sam alive and kill Optimus, who is the last of the Primes and the only Transformer who can defeat him.

Sam, Mikaela, and Leo, Sam’s college roommate, are targeted by the Decepticons. Alice, a Pretender Decepticon, first attempts to seduce Sam and then tries to attack him, but Mikaela and Leo enter the room and help him escape. They kill Alice, but are captured by Grindor under the orders of Megatron, who says that the symbols in Sam’s mind will lead the Deceptions to a new Energon source. Megatron orders Scalpel to remove Sam’s brain, but Optimus and Bumblebee arrive to rescue them. Bumblebee, Leo, and Mikaela escape as Optimus engages Megatron, Starscream, and Grindor in a fight. Sam watches the three Decepticons overpower Optimus, but the Prime eventually gets the better of Megatron and Starscream; also killing Grindor. As Optimus attempts to find Sam, Megatron mortally stabs him. After encouraging Sam to run, Optimus dies. This forces the human party to retreat as Autobots repel Megatron and Starscream.

The Decepticons prepare for The Fallen’s arrival; after landing on Earth, The Fallen, now informed of the death of Optimus, hijacks Earth’s telecommunications systems, asking for Sam. In return, the assurance of mankind’s survival. Sam, now an international fugitive, enlists the help of Seymour Simmons, who reveals that the Transformers visited Eartheons ago and the most ancient, known as Seekers, live in secret. With the help from Wheelie, they track down an elderly Decepticon named Jetfire, helping the group get toEgypt to find the the Matrix of Leadership, which will revive Optimus. Simmons contacts NEST, telling them to bring Optimus and the other Autobots to Egypt.

Sam’s group finds the Tomb of the Primes hidden in Petra, but the Matrix disintegrates into dust in Sam’s hands. Undeterred, Sam places the Matrix’s remains in his sock. NEST and the Autobots land, but they are attacked by a large force of Decepticons. During the battle, Sam reunites with his parents (having found out about the Transformers existence) before getting rescued by Bumblebee, who ends up killing Ravage and Rampage in the process.During the battle, Devastator demolishes one of the Pyramids of Giza, revealing the Sun Harvester inside, before being killed. With the Decepticons gaining the upper hand, Lennox and Epps call in an airstrike, which kills most Decepticon forces. However, Megatron manages to shoot Sam, seemingly killing him, before being forced to retreat. Nearing his death, the Seven Primes contact Sam through a vision, telling him the Matrix is earned, and that he earned the right to bear it. They restore Sam’s life and the Matrix, which the latter is used to revive Optimus.

The Fallen arrives and steals the Matrix from Optimus, using it to activate the Sun Harvester. A wounded Jetfire sacrifices himself in order for Optimus to gain the ability of flight. Optimus knocks The Fallen and Megatron off the pyramid and destroys the Sun Harvester. He then engages The Fallen in a fight until Megatron appears, though the Prime cripples Megatron. The two continue the fight, The Fallen tearing Optimus’ new armour apart, but he overpowers him yet again. Wounded, The Fallen attempts to escape, but Optimus rips his spark out of his chest, killing him, while an injured Megatron watches in horror. Vowing vengence, he retreats with Starscream. The Autobots and their allies return to the United States as Optimus sends a message of his own.

Cast

Humans

Transformers

Autobots

Decepticons

  • Tony Todd voices The Fallen, a rogue Prime and Megatron’s master, who seeks to exact revenge on the other six Primes, their remaining descendants (mainly Optimus) and humanity by finding the Matrix of Leadership and using it to activate a machine he built under Egypt’s Great Pyramid centuries before to provide the Decepticons with anenergon source, destroying Earth’s sun and all life on Earth in the process.
  • Hugo Weaving voices Megatron, the Fallen’s apprentice and the commander of the Decepticons who transforms into a Cybertronian hover tank.
  • Charlie Adler voices Starscream, Megatron’s second-in-command who transforms into a Lockheed Martin F-22 Raptor.
  • Frank Welker voices Grindor, the Decepticon who shares Blackout‘s body and transforms into a Sikorsky CH-53E Super Stallion / Soundwave, the Decepticon communications officer. / Ravage, Soundwave’s minion who is a mechanical one-eyed Jaguar / Devastator, a Constructicon combiner. / Reedman, a Decepticon formed of small bead-like Decepticons.
  • John DiCrosta voices The Doctor, a spider-like Decepticon who transforms into a microscope.
  • Isabel Lucas as Alice, a female pretender sent to spy on Sam in college who transforms into an Alice in Wonderland android.
  • Constructicons

Seven Primes

Production

Development

Major hurdles for film’s initial production stages included the 2007–2008 Writers Guild of America strike as well as the threat of strikes by other guilds. Prior to a potential Directors Guild of America strike, Bay began creating animatics of action sequences featuring characters rejected for the 2007 film. This would allow animators to complete sequences if the Directors Guild of America went on strike in July 2008, which ultimately did not happen.[4][5] Bay considered making a small project in between Transformers and its sequel, but decided against the idea, saying “you have your baby and you don’t want someone else to take it”.[6]

Screenwriters Roberto Orci and Alex Kurtzman, who had written the first film, originally passed on the opportunity to write a sequel due to schedule conflicts. The studio began courting other writers in May 2007, but were unimpressed with other pitches and eventually convinced Orci and Kurtzman to return.[4] The studio also hired Ehren Kruger, who had impressed Bay and Hasbro president Brian Goldner with his knowledge of the Transformers mythology.[7] The writing trio were paid $8 million.[4] Screenwriting was interrupted by the 2007–2008 Writers Guild of America strike, but to avoid production delays, the writers spent two weeks writing a treatment, which they handed in the night before the strike began.[8] Bay then expanded the outline into a 60-page scriptment,[9] which included more action, humor, and characters.[8][10] The three writers spent four months finishing the screenplay while “locked” in two hotel rooms by Bay; Kruger wrote in his own room and the trio would check on each other’s work twice a day.[11]

Orci described the film’s theme as “being away from home”, with the Autobots contemplating living on Earth as they cannot restore Cybertron, while Sam goes to college.[12] He wanted the focus between the robots and humans “much more evenly balanced”,[13] “the stakes [to] be higher”, and more focused on the science fiction elements.[14] Orci added he wanted to “modulate” the humor more,[15] and felt he managed the more “outrageous” jokes by balancing them with a more serious plot approach to the Transformers’mythology.[16] Bay concurred that he wanted to please fans by making the tone darker,[17] and that “mums will think it[‘]s safe enough to bring the kids back out to the movies.”[18]Two elements were added late into the film: the Autobot Jolt—as General Motors wanted to advertise the Chevrolet Volt—and the railgun that kills Devastator, a new acquisition by the U.S. Military.[19]

In September 2007, Paramount announced a late June 2009 release date for the sequel to Transformers.[20] The film was given a $200 million budget, which was $50 million more than the first film,[21] and some of the action scenes rejected for the original were written into the sequel.[22] Producer Lorenzo di Bonaventura later stated the studio proposed filming two sequels simultaneously, but he and Bay agreed that the idea was not the right direction for the series.[23]

Prior to the first film’s release, producer Tom DeSanto had “a very cool idea” to introduce the Dinobots,[24] while Bay was interested in including an aircraft carrier, which was dropped from the 2007 film.[25] Orci claimed they did not incorporate these characters into Revenge of the Fallen because they could not think of a way to justify the Dinobots’ choice of form,[12] and were unable to fit in the aircraft carrier.[26] Orci also admitted he was dismissive of the Dinobots because he does not like dinosaurs, saying “I recognize I am weird in that department.”[27] However, he became fonder of them during filming because of their popularity with fans.[28] He added “I couldn’t see why a Transformer would feel the need to disguise himself in front of a bunch of lizards. Movie-wise, I mean. Once the general audience is fully on board with the whole thing, maybe Dinobots in the future.”[29] When asked on the subject, Michael Bay said he hated the Dinobots and they had never been in consideration for being featured in the movies.[30]

During production, Bay attempted to create a misinformation campaign to increase debate over what Transformers would be appearing in the film, as well as to try to throw fans off from the story of the film; however, Orci confessed it was generally unsuccessful.[26] The studio went as far as to censor MTV and Comic Book Resources interviews with Mowry and Furman, who confirmed Arcee and The Fallen would be in the picture.[31] Bay told Empire that Megatron would not be resurrected, claiming his new tank form was a toy-only character,[21] only for Orci to confirm Megatron would return in the film in February 2009.[32] Bay also claimed he faked the leaking of daily call sheets from the first week of filming, that revealed Ramón Rodríguez’s casting,[33] and the appearance of Jetfire and the twins.[34]

Inside Out (2015 film)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
Inside Out
Inside Out (2015 film) poster.jpg

Theatrical release poster
Directed by Pete Docter
Produced by Jonas Rivera
Screenplay by
Story by
Starring
Music by Michael Giacchino[1]
Cinematography Patrick Lin
Kim White
Edited by Kevin Nolting[2]
Production
company
Distributed by Walt Disney Studios Motion Pictures
Release dates
  • May 18, 2015 (Cannes)
  • June 19, 2015(United States)
Running time
94 minutes[3]
Country United States
Language English
Budget $175 million[4]
Box office $851.6 million[5]

Inside Out is a 2015 American 3D computer-animated comedy-drama adventure film[6] produced by Pixar Animation Studios and released by Walt Disney Pictures. The film was directed and co-written by Pete Docter, co-directed and co-written by Ronnie del Carmen and produced by Jonas Rivera, with music composed by Michael Giacchino. The film is set in the mind of a young girl named Riley Andersen (Kaitlyn Dias), where five personified emotions—Joy (Amy Poehler), Sadness (Phyllis Smith), Fear (Bill Hader), Anger (Lewis Black), and Disgust (Mindy Kaling)—try to lead her through life as her parents (Diane Lane and Kyle MacLachlan) move the family from Minnesota to San Francisco and she has to adjust to her new life.

Docter first began developing Inside Out in 2009 after noticing changes in his daughter’s personality as she grew older. The film’s producers consulted numerous psychologists, including Dacher Keltner[7] from the University of California, Berkeley, who helped revise the story by emphasizing the neuropsychological findings that human emotions are mirrored in interpersonal relationshipsand can be significantly moderated by them.

After premiering at the 68th Cannes Film Festival in May, Inside Out was released in theaters on June 19, 2015, accompanied by the short film Lava directed by James Ford Murphy. Critics praised the film’s concept, poignant subject matter, musical score, and the vocal performances—particularly for Poehler, Smith, and Richard Kind (Bing Bong). The film grossed $90.4 million in its first weekend—the highest opening for an original title;[8] it has accumulated over $851 million in worldwide box office revenue.[5] The film, after the release of The Good Dinosaur, marks the first time that Pixar released two feature films in the same year.[9]

Plot

A girl named Riley is born in Minnesota. Within her mind’s Headquarters, there live five personifications of her basic emotions: Joy, Sadness, Fear, Disgust, and Anger. The emotions influence Riley’s actions via a control console. Riley’s memories are stored in colored orbs, which are sent into long-term memory each night by a suction “memory tube“. Riley’s most important memories, known as “core memories”, are housed in a hub in Headquarters and power five “islands”, each of which reflects a different aspect of Riley’s personality. Joy always tries to keep Riley happy, and she and the other emotions try to prevent Sadness from using the console, not understanding her purpose.

When Riley is 11, her family moves to San Francisco. Riley is disappointed by their lifeless new home, and the moving van with all their belongings gets lost. Sadness begins touching Riley’s happy memories, causing them to become sad and to turn blue, so Joy tries to keep Sadness isolated. However, on Riley’s first day at her new school, Sadness causes Riley to cry in front of her class, creating a sad core memory. Joy tries to dispose of it before it reaches the core memory hub, but instead she knocks the other core memories loose, destabilizing the personality islands. As Joy scrambles to collect the core memories, she is sucked out of Headquarters by the “memory tube”, along with the core memories and Sadness. They land in the maze-like storage area of long-term memory.

Fear, Disgust, and Anger try to keep Riley happy, but inadvertently distance her from her parents, friends, and hobbies, causing her personality islands to crumble into theMemory Dump, an abyss where fading memories are disposed of and forgotten. Anger believes that going back to Minnesota will make Riley happy again, so he inserts a light bulb into the control console to give Riley the idea to run away to Minnesota. Meanwhile, in long-term memory, Joy and Sadness find Bing Bong, Riley’s childhood imaginary friend. He tells them they can get to Headquarters by riding the quite literal “train” of thought. After exploring Imagination Land in Riley’s mind, the three eventually catch the train back to HQ, but it crashes when Honesty Island falls and destroys the rails.

As Riley prepares to board a bus going towards Minnesota, Joy attempts to abandon Sadness by using a “recall tube” to return to Headquarters. However, Riley’s last island, Family Island, falls and breaks the tube, plunging Joy and Bing Bong down into the Memory Dump. At the bottom, Joy discovers a sad memory of a hockey game that becomes happy when Riley’s parents and friends comfort her, so Joy realizes that Sadness’s importance is to alert others when Riley needs help.

Joy and Bing Bong try to use Bing Bong’s old wagon rocket to escape the Memory Dump by singing to power the wagon rocket, but after several tries Bing Bong realizes their combined weight is too much and jumps out, allowing Joy to escape the pit. Bing Bong continues to fade away in the darkness, and will be forgotten eventually. Joy goes to Imagination Land and uses various tools to propel herself and Sadness through the air to Headquarters. They find that the idea to run away has disabled the control console, rendering Riley numb and apathetic. Joy encourages Sadness to control the console; Sadness successfully removes the idea and reactivates the console, prompting Riley to return home.

As Riley arrives home, Sadness touches the core memories to put them back, which causes Riley to burst into tears and confess to her parents that she misses her old life in Minnesota. Riley’s parents comfort and reassure her, creating a new core memory, a combination of sad and happy, blue and yellow. A year later, Riley turns 12 and is adapting to her new home; her emotions now work together to help her lead a more emotionally complex life.

Voice cast

 

The film’s crew, along with the English and French voice actors, attended the film’s premiere at the 2015 Cannes Film Festival: Lewis Black,Phyllis Smith, Mindy Kaling, Amy Poehler, Jonas Rivera, Marilou Berry,Pete Docter, Ronnie del Carmen,Mélanie Laurent, John Lasseter,Charlotte Le Bon, Pierre Niney, andGilles Lellouche.

The Hunger Games: Catching Fire

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
This article is about the film. For the novel on which it is based, see Catching Fire.
The Hunger Games:
Catching Fire
A girl holding a bow, pulling back an arrow, in a fiery circle against a black background.

Theatrical release poster
Directed by Francis Lawrence
Produced by
Screenplay by
Based on Catching Fire 
by Suzanne Collins
Starring
Music by James Newton Howard
Cinematography Jo Willems
Edited by Alan Edward Bell
Production
company
Distributed by Lionsgate (US/UK)StudioCanal (Germany)Universal Studios (Italy)
Release dates
  • November 11, 2013(London premiere)
  • November 22, 2013(United States)
Running time
146 minutes[1]
Country United States
Language English
Budget $130–140 million[2][3][4]
Box office $865 million[2]

The Hunger Games: Catching Fire is a 2013 American dystopian science fiction adventure film based on Suzanne Collinsdystopian novel, Catching Fire (2009), the second installment in The Hunger Games trilogy. The film is the sequel to The Hunger Games (2012) and the second installment in The Hunger Games film series, produced by Nina Jacobson and Jon Kilik, and distributed by Lionsgate. Francis Lawrence directed the film, with a screenplay by Simon Beaufoy and Michael Arndt. Adding to the existing cast, the supporting cast was filled out with Philip Seymour Hoffman, Jeffrey Wright, Jena Malone, Sam Claflin, Lynn Cohen,Amanda Plummer, Alan Ritchson, and Meta Golding. Filming began on September 10, 2012, in Atlanta, Georgia, before moving toHawaii.

The plot of Catching Fire takes place a few months after the previous installment; Katniss Everdeen and fellow District 12 tributePeeta Mellark have returned home safely after winning the 74th Annual Hunger Games. Throughout the story, Katniss senses that a rebellion against the oppressive Capitol is simmering throughout the districts.

The Hunger Games: Catching Fire was released on November 15, 2013, in Brazil; November 20 in Finland, Sweden, and Norway; November 21 in the United Kingdom; and November 22 in IMAX, in the United States. The film set records for the biggest November opening weekend and biggest three- and five-day Thanksgiving box-office totals, surpassing the first film’s box office grosses. It ranks as the 10th highest grossing film at the domestic box office[5] and the highest-grossing film at the domestic box office of 2013, becoming the first 2-D film since The Dark Knight (2008) to top the yearly box office, as well as having a lead female top the box office since The Exorcist (1973). The film has grossed over $865 million worldwide and is the highest-grossing entry inThe Hunger Games series.

Catching Fire received positive reviews and is widely considered by critics to be an improvement over its predecessor, with the sentiment being that it’s “a more-confident, more-polished movie”; praise also goes to Lawrence’s performance as Katniss. The film also received numerous nominations, with a nomination for the Broadcast Film Critics Association Award for Best Action Film and aSaturn Award for Best Science Fiction Film. For her performance, Lawrence was nominated a second time for the Empire Award forBest Actress as well as the Saturn Award and Broadcast Film Critics Association Award. The song “Atlas” was also nominated for the Grammy Award for Best Song Written for Visual Media and a Golden Globe Award for Best Original Song.

The Hunger Games: Mockingjay is a two-part sequel: Part 1 was released on November 21, 2014 in the United States, and Part 2on November 20, 2015.

Plot

After winning the 74th Hunger Games, Katniss Everdeen and Peeta Mellark return home to District 12. President Snow visits Katniss at her home. The two make an agreement to not lie to one another, and Snow explains that her actions in the Games have inspired rebellions across the districts. He orders her to use the upcoming victory tour to convince him that her actions were out of genuine love for Peeta, not defiance against the Capitol, otherwise Katniss’ loved ones will be killed.

As the tour begins, Haymitch Abernathy, Katniss and Peeta’s mentor, warns them that the “show” of their relationship must continue for the rest of their lives. Katniss suggests a public engagement between herself and Peeta, which is carried out and approved by Snow at his mansion in the Capitol.

Returning home, Katniss warns her friend Gale Hawthorne of Snow’s threat to kill both their families. Peacekeepers crack down on District 12, and Gale is publicly whipped after attacking new Head Peacekeeper Romulus Thread. Snow announces that the upcoming 75th Hunger Games, the Third Quarter Quell, will feature tributes selected from previous victors. Katniss immediately devotes herself to ensuring Peeta’s survival, and recruits Haymitch’s help to do so. At the reaping, Effie Trinket draws Katniss and Haymitch’s names, but Peeta immediately volunteers to take Haymitch’s place.

As they prepare, Haymitch reveals that all the tributes are angry about being returned to the Games and advises a reluctant Katniss to make allies. In the pre-Games interviews, Katniss wears a wedding dress, as ordered by President Snow, but her stylist Cinna rigs it to transform into a representation of a mockingjay. Peeta announces that he and Katniss have secretly married and are expecting a baby, which causes outrage, and the audience of Capitol citizens begins shouting for the Games to be stopped, to no avail. Just before Katniss enters the arena, Cinna is severely beaten by Peacekeepers, as punishment for the dress, and dragged away as Katniss watches helplessly.

In the Games, Katniss allies with Finnick Odair and the elderly Mags, from District 4. The arena’s outer force field shocks Peeta, stopping his heartbeat until Finnick revives him. The group flees a poisonous fog, and Mags sacrifices herself so as to avoid slowing them down. When vicious mandrills attack, Peeta is saved by the unexpected sacrifice of a tribute from District 6. The group escapes to a beach and meets District 3’s Wiress and Beetee, and District 7’s Johanna Mason. Wiress discovers the arena is designed like a clock with regular hazards each hour, but is killed soon afterward by Cashmere and Gloss, the brother and sister tributes from District 1, who are in turn killed by Johanna and Katniss, respectively.

Beetee suggests using one of the hazards, a tree that is struck by lightning every 12 hours, and a coil of wire to electrocute the other remaining tributes. The group separates to prepare the trap, but once alone Johanna suddenly hits Katniss over the head, stunning her, and discreetly cuts the tracker from her arm. Katniss returns to the tree and finds an unconscious Beetee with the wire from the tree attached to a makeshift spear. Unable to find Peeta, Katniss almost attacks Finnick, but Finnick reminds her to remember “who the real enemy is”, as Haymitch had advised her prior to the Games. Katniss attaches the remaining wire to an arrow and shoots it into the arena’s force field as the lightning hits, causing a power failure that takes down the dome’s force field as well as the Capitol’s surveillance.

Katniss awakens in an aircraft to find Haymitch, Beetee, Finnick, and Plutarch Heavensbee, the head Gamemaker, who is revealed to be a rebel against Snow. He tells her they are bound for District 13, headquarters of the new rebellion, and that half the tributes were aware of the plan to escape with Katniss, who symbolizes the growing rebellion. They were unable to rescue Peeta and Johanna, who were taken by the Capitol. A distraught Katniss is sedated after attacking Haymitch. She later awakens to find Gale by her side, who reassures her that her family is safe but tells her that District 12 has been destroyed by the Capitol.

Cast

For character descriptions from the novels, see List of The Hunger Games characters.

Production

Pre-production

Lionsgate announced that a film adaptation of Catching Fire would be released as The Hunger Games: Catching Fire on November 22, 2013,[6] as a sequel to the film adaptationof The Hunger Games, with principal photography to take place in September 2012. Simon Beaufoy was hired to write the script for the film and wrote two drafts[7] before leaving after Gary Ross, director of The Hunger Games decided not to direct the sequel. The shooting timeframe was co-ordinated between Lionsgate and 20th Century Fox, in order to allow time for Jennifer Lawrence to shoot X-Men: Days of Future Past, the sequel to Fox’s X-Men: First Class, in January 2013.[8]

On April 10, 2012, it was announced that Gary Ross, director of The Hunger Games, would not return due to a ‘tight’ and ‘fitted’ schedule.[9] Bennett Miller, Joe Cornish, Francis Lawrence and Juan Antonio Bayona were all being considered to direct the new film.[10] On April 19, 2012, it was announced that Francis Lawrence was offered the director position for the film. According to sources, the adaptation needed to be done filming by December 2012 to fit Jennifer Lawrence’s schedule.[11] When X-Men: Days of Future Pastlost its original director[12] and shooting for the film was delayed till April 2013,[13] Jennifer Lawrence was no longer needed to be filming in January 2013 and the shooting timeframe for The Hunger Games: Catching Fire was extended to March (including several breaks due to the holidays and awards season).[14] Lionsgate officially announced Francis Lawrence as the director for Catching Fire on May 3, 2012.[15] Two days later, it was reported that Michael Arndt (Toy Story 3, Little Miss Sunshine) was in talks to re-write the script for Catching Fire.[16] On May 24, 2012, the film was renamed The Hunger Games: Catching Fire[17] and Arndt was confirmed as the new writer of the script.[18]The film featured sequences filmed in the IMAX format.[19]

Casting

In July 2012, it was announced that Jena Malone would portray Johanna Mason,[20] that Amanda Plummer would portray Wiress, and that Philip Seymour Hoffman would portray Plutarch Heavensbee.[21] Following this, in August 2012, it was announced that Lynn Cohen had been cast as Mags.[22] Alan Ritchson was cast as Gloss on August 9,[23] Sam Claflin as Finnick Odair on August 22,[24] and Jeffrey Wright as Beetee on September 7.[25]

Filming

Lawrence, Hutcherson and Hemsworth all dyed their hair for the movie once again. Lawrence went back into archery training in order to get in shape for the role while the supporting cast undertook training in preparation for the arena scenes.[26]

Production officially began on September 10, 2012, with shooting concluding for some of the cast on December 21, 2012.[27] After the Christmas break, filming resumed for two weeks in mid January for some of the main cast[28] and was placed on hold for awards season. Principal photography resumed and concluded in March 2013.[29] Shooting first took place in and around metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia and then moved to Hawaii, to shoot the arena scenes.[30] The cast and crew were on a busy schedule, working 14-hour days and six days a week. In an interview with MTV, Josh Hutcherson confirmed scenes in the film would use IMAX cameras by stating, “They’re shooting, I think, all the stuff in the arena is going to be IMAX”.[31] Jennifer Lawrence and Liam Hemsworth were in Ringwood, New Jersey shooting District 12 scenes involving snow for the beginning of the film on January 31 and February 1.[32] Jennifer Lawrence confirmed that she would fly out to Hawaii on February 25, the day after the 85th Academy Awards to shoot for the final 9 days along with Claflin and Hutcherson.

In late March, filming occurred in the Universal Studios back lot and was kept extremely secretive. Witnesses reported of towers and fences on set. None of the main cast were believed to have been on set.[33] Reshoots were scheduled for April 13 in Atlanta. With the base camp set up at Executive Park off North Druid Hills Road, filming also occurred at the Goat Farm Arts Center.[34][35]

Francis Lawrence has estimated an hour of the film would be devoted to Arena scenes, and said that cameras would be mounted to avoid the shaky-cam look from the first film.[36] In an IMAX featurette, Francis Lawrence also confirmed that scenes taking place in the Arena were shot on IMAX cameras to distinguish them from scenes external to the Arena.[37] Approximately 50 minutes of the film’s footage was shot in the IMAX format, through the use of three IMAX 15 perf/65mm film cameras.[38][39]

Costumes

Sarah Burton, creative director at Alexander McQueen, gave pieces of McQueen’s collection to costume designer Trish Summerville.[40] Summerville collaborated with Indonesian designer Tex Saverio when designing Katniss’ wedding dress for the Quarter Quell interviews.[41]

Music

Soundtrack

British singer Ed Sheeran recorded three songs for the soundtrack, but Lionsgate declined the offer.[42] On May 14, 2013, Alexandra Patsavas was listed in the credits as music supervisor, replacing T Bone Burnett from the first film. Coldplay were announced as the first official artist to be featured on the Catching Fire soundtrack album, with the song “Atlas“, released worldwide on September 6, 2013.[43] Christina Aguilera announced that her song, “We Remain”, would be part of the official soundtrack of the film.[44] Other artists featured on the soundtrack include Of Monsters and Men with “Silhouettes”, Sia featuring The Weeknd & Diplo with “Elastic Heart“, The National with “Lean”, The Weeknd with “Devil May Cry”, Imagine Dragons with “Who We Are”, Lorde with “Everybody Wants to Rule the World“, The Lumineers with “Gale Song”, Ellie Goulding with “Mirror”, Patti Smith with “Capitol Letter”, Santigold with “Shooting Arrows at the Sky”, Mikky Ekko with “Place for Us”, Phantogram with “Lights”, and Antony and the Johnsons with “Angel on Fire”.[45]

The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
This article is about the 2001 live-action film. For the book from which it was adapted, see The Fellowship of the Ring. For other uses, see The Fellowship of the Ring (disambiguation).
The Lord of the Rings:
The Fellowship of the Ring
The Fellowship Of The Ring.jpg

Theatrical release poster
Directed by Peter Jackson
Produced by
Screenplay by
Based on The Fellowship of the Ring 
by J. R. R. Tolkien
Starring
Music by Howard Shore
Cinematography Andrew Lesnie
Edited by John Gilbert
Production
companies
Distributed by New Line Cinema1
Release dates
  • 10 December 2001(Odeon Leicester Square)
  • 19 December 2001(North America)
  • 20 December 2001(New Zealand)
Running time
178 minutes[1]
Country
  • New Zealand[2]
  • United States[2]
Language English
Budget $93 million[3]
Box office $871.5 million[3]

The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring is a 2001 epic high fantasy film directed by Peter Jackson based on the first volume of J. R. R. Tolkien‘s The Lord of the Rings (1954–1955).[4][5][6] It is the first instalment in The Lord of the Rings film trilogy, and was followed by The Two Towers (2002) and The Return of the King (2003), based on the second and third volumes of The Lord of the Rings.

Set in Middle-earth, the story tells of the Dark Lord Sauron (Sala Baker), who is seeking the One Ring. The Ring has found its way to the young hobbit Frodo Baggins (Elijah Wood). The fate of Middle-earth hangs in the balance as Frodo and eight companions who form the Fellowship of the Ring begin their journey to Mount Doom in the land of Mordor, the only place where the Ring can be destroyed.

Released on 10 December 2001, the film was highly acclaimed by critics and fans alike who considered it to be a landmark in film-making and an achievement in the fantasy film genre. It has continued to be featured on critic lists of the greatest fantasy films ever made, as of 2015. The film was a massive box office success, earning over $871 million worldwide, and becoming the second highest-grossing film of 2001 in the US and worldwide (behind Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone). As of June 2015, it is the40th highest-grossing film of all time worldwide unadjusted for inflation.

It was nominated for thirteen Oscars at the 74th Academy Awards ceremony, winning four for Best Cinematography, Best Makeup,Best Original Score, and Best Visual Effects. It won also four British Academy Film Awards, including Best Film and Best Director BAFTA awards. The Special Extended Edition was released to DVD on 12 November 2002 and to Blu-ray Disc on 28 June 2011. In 2007, The Fellowship of the Ring was voted No. 50 on the American Film Institute‘s list of 100 greatest American films. The AFI also voted it the second greatest fantasy film of all time during their 10 Top 10 special.

Plot

In the Second Age of Middle Earth, the Dark Lord Sauron forges the One Ring in Mount Doom to conquer all. An alliance of men and elves battle Sauron’s forces in Mordor, where Isildur kills Sauron by chopping off the hand wearing the One Ring. Sauron’s spirit survives within the ring and corrupts Isildur so that he keeps it instead of destroying it. This decision leads to Isildur’s being killed by Orcs, and the ring is lost in the river Anduin for 2500 years. It comes into the possession of Sméagol who is consumed by its power and becomes Gollum. After 500 years the ring abandons him, to be discovered by a Hobbit named Bilbo Baggins.

Sixty years later, Bilbo celebrates his 111th birthday and is visited by his friend Gandalf the Grey. Bilbo reveals he intends to leave the Shire to stay with the elves of Rivendell, and leave his inheritance to his nephew Frodo. Gandalf convinces Bilbo to leave the One Ring for Frodo. Concerned about Bilbo’s ring, Gandalf investigates and discovers it is the One Ring. He warns Frodo and says it retains the evil of Sauron’s spirit. Unfortunately Gollum, who has been captured by Sauron’s orcs, reveals Bilbo might have the ring. Gandalf catches Samwise Gamgee, Frodo’s friend, overhearing the details of true nature of the ring. He forces Sam to accompany Frodo to the village of Bree in a plan to keep the ring safe. Gandalf goes to Isengard to get advice from Saruman the White, where he learns Sauron has unleashed the Ringwraiths to retrieve the Ring. Saruman reveals his allegiance to Sauron, and imprisons Gandalf on the roof of his tower Orthanc.

On their way to Bree, Frodo and Sam meet fellow Hobbits, Merry and Pippin, and evade the pursuing Ringwraiths. Arriving in Bree, they learn that Gandalf is missing, but a ranger named Strider escorts them to Rivendell. On their way the Hobbits are ambushed by the Ringwraiths at Amon Sul, and Frodo is stabbed with a morgul blade. The Elvin princess Arwen, encounters the group and takes Frodo to Rivendell while being pursued by the Ringwraiths. Frodo is healed by Arwen’s father Elrond and wakes to find Gandalf present after he escaped Isengard on a giant eagle. Elrond holds a council to decide the fate of the Ring and Frodo learns that the ring can only be destroyed in the fires of Mount Doom. Frodo also learns that Strider is Aragorn, the descendant of Isildur and the rightful King of Gondor. Frodo volunteers to take the ring to Mordor and Gandalf, Aragorn, the dwarf Gimli, the elf Legolas, the man Boromir of Gondor, Samwise, Pippin and Merry all volunteer to accompany him and are named as ‘The Fellowship of the Ring’. Before Frodo leaves, Bilbo gives him his elven sword Sting.

The Fellowship journey over the Misty Mountains but when Saruman magically blocks their path, they venture into the Dwarven Mines of Moria. However, all of the Dwarves who previously resided there have been slain by Orcs, who now occupy the mines, and the Fellowship hopes their presence will go unnoticed. Gollum stalks them and they are eventually attacked by orcs and a cave troll. They escape but are confronted by an ancient demon, a Balrog. Gandalf prevents the Balrog from pursuing them, but in so doing is dragged into a chasm. Aragorn leads the Fellowship to Lothlórien, home of Galadriel and Celeborn, where Gandalf’s passing is mourned. Galadriel informs Frodo that only he can complete the quest, and one of the company will try to take the Ring. Meanwhile, Saruman forms an army of Uruk-hai to hunt and kill the Fellowship but bring the holder of the Ring, a hobbit, back to him unharmed.

The Fellowship leave Lothlorien by river to Parth Galen. Boromir attempts to take the Ring from Frodo but Frodo escapes and afraid of the corrupting power of the ring decides to journey to Mordor alone. The pursuing Uruk-hai catch up to the Fellowship, and a fight begins, in which Boromir is fatally wounded by the Uruk-hai commander Lurtz; Merry and Pippin are kidnapped in the belief that they have the ring; and Aragorn beheads Lurtz and helps the dying Boromir find peace. Sam follows Frodo and persuades him that he must accompany Frodo to Mordor. Aragorn, Legolas and Gimli pursue the Uruk-hai to rescue Merry and Pippin.

Cast

 

The eponymous Fellowship, from left to right: (Top row) Aragorn, Gandalf, Legolas, Boromir, (bottom row) Sam, Frodo, Merry, Pippin, Gimli.

Before filming began on 11 October 1999, the principal actors trained for six weeks in sword fighting (with Bob Anderson), riding and boating. Jackson hoped such activities would allow the cast to bond so chemistry would be evident on screen as well as getting them used to life in Wellington.[7] They were also trained to pronounce Tolkien’s verses properly.[8] After the shoot, the nine cast members playing the Fellowship got a tattoo, the Elvish symbol for the number nine, with the exception ofJohn Rhys-Davies, whose stunt double got the tattoo instead.[9] The film is noted for having an ensemble cast,[10] and some of the cast and their respective characters include:

Ice Age: Continental Drift

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
Ice Age: Continental Drift
Ice Age Continental Drift.jpg

Theatrical release poster
Directed by Steve Martino
Michael Thurmeier
Produced by Lori Forte
John C. Donkin
Screenplay by Michael Berg
Jason Fuchs
Story by Michael Berg
Lori Forte
Starring
Music by John Powell
Cinematography Renato Falcão
Edited by James Palumbo
David Ian Salter
Production
company
Distributed by 20th Century Fox
Release dates
  • June 27, 2012 (Europe)
  • July 13, 2012(North America)
Running time
88 minutes[1]
Country United States
Language English
Budget $95 million[2][3]
Box office $877.2 million[3]

Ice Age: Continental Drift is a 2012 American 3D computer-animated comedy adventure film directed by Steve Martino andMichael Thurmeier. It was written by Jason Fuchs and Michael Berg, and features the voices of Ray Romano, John Leguizamo,Denis Leary, Nicki Minaj, Drake, with Jennifer Lopez, and Queen Latifah.

It is the fourth installment of the Ice Age series, produced by Blue Sky Studios and distributed by 20th Century Fox. It is the first sequel in the series not directed by Carlos Saldanha,[4] and the second Ice Age installment that utilises Digital 3D. It was released in the US on July 13, 2012, three years after its predecessor Dawn of the Dinosaurs. This was the first Ice Age film to be presented in the 2.39:1 aspect ratio.

Despite receiving mixed reviews from critics, the film became a box office success, with a worldwide gross of over $877 million, marking it the highest grossing animated film of 2012.

A fifth film, titled Ice Age: Collision Course, is scheduled for release on July 22, 2016.[5]

Plot

While Scrat inadvertently causes the break up of Pangaea, Manny and Ellie are forced to deal with the trials and tribulations of their teenage daughter Peaches, who has trouble fitting in with her peers. Ellie tries to support her daughter, but Manny becomes exceedingly over-protective. Meanwhile, Sid’s family returns, but only long enough to drop off the elderly Granny before abandoning them both. Shortly after, a continental break-up separates Manny from the herd. Trapped on a moving chunk of ice with Sid, Granny, and Diego, Manny has no choice but to ride out the current. Meanwhile, a giant land shift encroaches on Ellie, Peaches, and those remaining on land, causing them to make their way toward the land bridge.

Meanwhile, Scrat, in a subplot, finds an acorn that has a treasure map on it that directs him towards an island. After violent weather pushes them further away from land, Manny’s group is captured by a band of pirates sailing on a floating iceberg led by aGigantopithecus, Captain Gutt, who attempts to press them into his crew. When they refuse, Gutt tries to execute them, leading to their escape, which inadvertently cause the ship to sink. Gutt’s first mate, a female sabretooth named Shira, joins them after she is left for dead.

The herd washes ashore on Switchback Cove, which gives a current back to their home. Manny coordinates a plan using a group ofhyrax to steal a ship that Gutt is planning to use, and they are able to escape using the ship, Shira staying with Gutt. Gutt forms another ship and plans to seek revenge on Manny.

After narrowly escaping a pack of sirens, Manny, Sid, Diego, and Granny return home only to find the land bridge destroyed and that Gutt has beaten them and taken Ellie, Peaches, and the rest of the herd hostage. A fight issues, as Granny’s pet whale Precious arrives and fends off Gutt’s crew. Manny defeats Gutt in a final duel on an ice floe and reunites with his family and friends. Gutt subsequently encounters a siren that appears the shape of a female Gigantopithecus, and is eaten alive. With their home destroyed, Precious takes the entire crew, including Shira to a lush island.

In the film’s epilogue, Scrat discovers the island on the map, known as Scratlantis (a parody of Atlantis), but his uncontrollable urge to hunt acorns in the acorn-rich city inadvertently causes the entire island to sink when he unplugs an acorn drain holder; Scrat is then ejected into what is now known as Death Valley, California.

Voice cast

Production

The first details of the sequel were announced on January 10, 2010, when The New York Times reported that Blue Sky was working on a fourth film and was in negotiations with the voice cast.[14] Fox later confirmed on May 5, 2010, that Ice Age: Continental Drift would be released on July 13, 2012.[15]

Soundtrack

Ice Age: Continental Drift
Film score by John Powell
Released July 10, 2012
Recorded 2012
Genre Score
Length 57:57
Label Varèse Sarabande
John Powell film scores chronology
Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax
(2012)
Ice Age: Continental Drift
(2012)
Rio 2
(2014)

Ice Age: Continental Drift is the soundtrack of the film scored by John Powell and was released on July 10, 2012.[16]

Track listing[edit]

No. Title Length
1. “Morning Peaches”   2:22
2. “Schism”   2:28
3. “Storm”   3:50
4. “No Exit Gutt”   5:37
5. “Escape from Captivity”   3:02
6. “New Loves”   4:50
7. “Hyraxes / Prison Talk”   2:57
8. “Diversion”   3:57
9. “Pirating the Pirates”   4:37
10. “Teen Cave”   4:42
11. “Sirens”   2:35
12. “Land Bridge Trap”   8:22
13. “Herd Reunion”   3:08
14. “Scrat’s Fantasia”   5:30
Total length:
57:57

Featured in the film was “Chasing the Sun“, performed by The Wanted[17] the film’s first theme song, and the second theme song “We are (Family)” written by Ester Dean, performed by Keke Palmer.[18] Both songs play during the credits and are not available on the soundtrack. “Chasing The Sun” can be found on The Wanted’s 2012 American debut extended play, The Wanted EP, while an alternate version of “We are (Family)” sung only by Keke Palmer is available for download.

In addition to the original score by John Powell, the film also features Beethoven‘s 9th Symphony. Powell explained his decision: “At the beginning of the film, the creation of the geographical world as we know it seemed just such an immense idea to musically convey, that I gave up entirely and used Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony instead. With a bit of obscenely crass re-orchestration and blatantly cheap arranging tricks normally associated with strippers, we got it to fit the action perfectly. But the cost that I must now bear is having to live forever in hiding, since the “Beethoven Society” issued a “fatwa” on me.”[19]

Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets (film)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets
Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets movie.jpg

British poster
Directed by Chris Columbus
Produced by David Heyman
Screenplay by Steve Kloves
Based on Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets 
by J. K. Rowling
Starring Daniel Radcliffe
Rupert Grint
Emma Watson
(See below)
Music by John Williams
Cinematography Roger Pratt
Edited by Peter Honess
Production
company
Distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures
Release dates
  • 3 November 2002(London premiere)
  • 15 November 2002(United Kingdom & United States)
Running time
161 minutes
Country United Kingdom
United States
Language English
Budget $100 million
Box office $879 million[1]

Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets is a 2002 fantasy film directed by Chris Columbus and distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures.[1] It is based on the novel of the same name by J. K. Rowling. The film, which is the second instalment in the Harry Potterfilm series, was written by Steve Kloves and produced by David Heyman. The story follows Harry Potter‘s second year atHogwarts as the Heir of Salazar Slytherin opens the Chamber of Secrets, unleashing a monster that petrifies the school’s denizens.

The film stars Daniel Radcliffe as Harry Potter, alongside Rupert Grint and Emma Watson as Harry’s best friends Ron Weasleyand Hermione Granger. It is the sequel to Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone and is followed by Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban.

The film was released on 15 November 2002 in the United Kingdom and North America. It was very well received critically and commercially, making US$879 million worldwide. It is the seventh-highest-grossing film in the Harry Potter series and the 38th-highest-grossing film of all time.[1] It was nominated for three BAFTA Film Awards in 2003.

Plot

Further information: Plot of the novel

Harry Potter spends the summer without receiving letters from his Hogwarts friends. In his room, Harry meets Dobby, a house-elf who warns him bad things will happen if he returns to Hogwarts, and reveals he intercepted his friends’ letters. Harry chases him downstairs, where Dobby destroys a cake. The Dursleys lock Harry up, but Ron, Fred and George Weasley rescue him in their father’s flying Ford Anglia.

While buying school supplies, Harry and the Weasley family encounter Rubeus Hagrid and Hermione Granger, and they attend a book-signing by celebrity wizard Gilderoy Lockhart, who announces he will be the new Defence Against the Dark Arts teacher. Harry also encounters Draco Malfoy and his father Lucius, who slips a book in Ginny Weasley‘s belongings. When Harry and Ron are blocked from entering Platform Nine and Three-Quarters, they fly to Hogwarts in the Ford Anglia and crash into the hostileWhomping Willow. Ron’s wand is damaged, and the car throws them out before driving off. They are allowed back into school but face detention.

While serving detention with Lockhart, Harry hears voices and later finds caretaker Argus Filch‘s cat, Mrs Norris, petrified, and a message written in blood announcing the Chamber of Secrets has been opened and threatening “enemies of the Heir”. Professor McGonagall explains that one of Hogwarts’ founders, Salazar Slytherin, supposedly constructed a secret Chamber and placed inside it a monster that only his heir can control, to purge the school of impure-blooded wizards and witches. More attacks occur over the course of the year. Harry and Ron suspect Malfoy is the Heir, so Hermione suggests they question him while disguised using polyjuice potion. Their makeshift laboratory is in abandoned toilets haunted by a ghost, Moaning Myrtle.

When Harry communicates with a snake, something Salazar Slytherin could do, some believe he is the Heir. At Christmas, Harry and Ron learn that Malfoy is not the Heir, but he mentions that a girl died when the Chamber was last opened fifty years before. Harry finds an enchanted diary, owned by a former student named Tom Riddle, which shows him a flashback to fifty years before, where Riddle accused Hagrid, then a pupil, of opening the Chamber. When the diary disappears and Hermione is petrified, Harry and Ron question Hagrid. Professor Dumbledore, Cornelius Fudge, and Lucius Malfoy come to take Hagrid to Azkaban, but he discreetly tells the boys to “follow the spiders”. Lucius has Dumbledore suspended. In the Forbidden Forest, Harry and Ron find Aragog, who reveals Hagrid’s innocence and that the dead girl was found in a bathroom. Aragog sets his colony of Acromantula on Harry and Ron, but the now-wild Ford Anglia saves them.

A book page in Hermione’s hand reveals the monster is a basilisk, a giant snake that can instantly kill those who make direct eye contact with it; the petrified victims saw it indirectly. The school staff learn that Ginny was taken into the Chamber, and convince Lockhart to save her. Harry and Ron find Lockhart, revealed as a fraud, planning to flee; knowing Myrtle was the girl the Basilisk killed, they drag him to her bathroom and find the Chamber’s entrance. Once inside, Lockhart uses Ron’s damaged wand against them, but it backfires, wipes his memory, and causes a cave-in.

Harry enters the Chamber alone and finds Ginny unconscious and dying guarded by Tom Riddle. Harry realises Riddle is the Heir and he used the diary to manipulate Ginny and re-open the Chamber. Riddle then reveals his full name, Tom Marvolo Riddle, from which he created the anagram for his future new identity: “I am Lord Voldemort”. After Harry expresses support for Dumbledore, Dumbledore’s phoenix Fawkes flies in with the Sorting Hat, and Riddle summons the Basilisk. Fawkes blinds the Basilisk, and the Sorting Hat eventually produces a sword with which Harry battles and slays the Basilisk, but he is poisoned by its fangs.

Harry defeats Riddle and revives Ginny by stabbing the diary with a basilisk fang. Fawkes’ tears heal him, and he returns to Hogwarts with his friends and a baffled professor Lockhart. Dumbledore, reinstated as headmaster, praises them and orders for Hagrid’s release. Dumbledore shows Harry that the sword he wielded was Godric Gryffindor’s own sword, and says he is different from Voldemort because he chose Gryffindor House. Harry accuses Lucius, Dobby’s master, of putting the diary in Ginny’s cauldron and tricks him into freeing Dobby. The Basilisk’s victims are healed, and Hagrid returns to school.

Cast

Main article: List of Harry Potter films cast members

Production

Direction

Although Chris Columbus returned to direct, Frank Oz said in an interview with The A.V. Club that he was asked to direct this film but he had no interest on it.[4]

Set design

 

The flying Ford Anglia used in the film

Production designer Stuart Craig returned for the sequel to design new elements previously not seen in the first film. These included the Burrow (the Weasley’s house), Dumbledore’s office (which houses the Sorting Hat, The Sword of Gryffindor and Dumbledore’s desk),[5]Borgin and Burkes, and the Chamber of Secrets.

Mr. Weasley’s car was created from a Ford Anglia.[6]

Filming

Production for Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets began on 19 November 2001,[7] just three days after the wide release of thePhilosopher’s Stone. The first three weeks of shooting consisted mostly of second-unit work on special effects, primarily the flying car scene.[8] First-unit photography then began in Surrey, England, at Number Four Privet Drive, Little Whinging, for scenes taking place at the Dursleys’ home. Filming continued on location at the Isle of Man and in several places in Great Britain; Leavesden Film Studios in London made several scenes for Hogwarts. Other locations were shot in England, including a Hogwarts Express set in King’s Cross railway station Platform 9¾. The famous cloisters of England’s Gloucester Cathedral were used as the setting for Hogwart’s School.[9] Principal photography concluded in the summer of 2002,[10] while the film spent until early October in post-production.[11] In a change of cinematography from the first instalment, director Chris Columbus opted to handheld cameras for Chamber of Secrets to allow more freedom in movement.[12]

Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs
Ice Age Dawn of the Dinosaurs theatrical poster.jpg

Theatrical release poster
Directed by Carlos Saldanha
Mike Thurmeier (co-director)
Produced by Lori Forte
John C. Donkin
Screenplay by Michael Berg
Peter Ackerman
Mike Reiss
Yoni Brenner
Story by Jason Carter Eaton
Starring
Music by John Powell
Edited by Harry Hitner
Production
company
Distributed by 20th Century Fox
Release dates
  • July 1, 2009
Running time
94 minutes
Country United States
Language English
Budget $90 million
Box office $886.7 million[1]

Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs is a 2009 American 3-D computer animated comedy adventure film, produced by Blue Sky Studios and distributed by 20th Century Fox. It was directed by Carlos Saldanha and co-directed by Mike Thurmeier, and it features the voices of Ray Romano, John Leguizamo, Denis Leary and Queen Latifah.

The film is the third installment of the Ice Age series and a sequel to the 2006 film Ice Age: The Meltdown. The story has Sid being taken by a female Tyrannosaurus after stealing her eggs, leading the rest of the protagonists to rescue him in a tropical lost world inhabited by dinosaurs beneath the ice.

Despite receiving mixed reviews from critics, Dawn of the Dinosaurs ranked at the time as the second highest grossing animated film of all time,[2][3] earning $886.7 million worldwide. A sequel, titled Ice Age: Continental Drift, was released in 2012.

Plot

Ellie and Manny are expecting their first child, and Manny is obsessed with making life perfect and safe for the family, since his first experiences as a husband and father went bad when his family were killed by hunters. At the same time, Diego finds himself unable to catch a cocky gazelle he has been stalking and decides to leave the herd, believing that he is losing his predatory nature as a tiger. Sid begins to wish for a family of his own and “adopts” three apparently abandoned eggs that he finds in an icy underground cavern and call them Egbert, Shelly, and Yoko. Manny tells him to put them back, but Sid instead looks after the eggs, which hatch into baby Tyrannosaurus the next morning.

Although Sid tries his best to raise the three dinosaurs, their rambunctious behavior scares away all the other animals’ young and ruins a playground Manny built for his child. A female Tyrannosaurus, Momma, whose eggs Sid stole, soon returns and carries both Sid and her young underground, with Diego in pursuit. Manny, Ellie, Crash, and Eddie follow as well and discover that the icy cavern leads to a vast jungle populated by dinosaurs thought to be extinct. Here, an Ankylosaurus threatens the herd despite Diego’s efforts to fend it off; they are saved from a further crowd of angry reptiles by a deranged one-eyed weasel named Buck.

Buck has been living in this jungle for quite some time and is chasing Rudy (a huge albino Baryonyx), intending to avenge the eye he lost to it when he was young. He agrees to lead the herd through the jungle’s perils to Lava Falls, where Momma has taken Sid and her babies. In the meantime, Sid and Momma try to outdo each other in feeding the offspring; he loses this contest, but is soon welcomed into the family regardless. The next day, however, Sid is separated from the family and attacked by Rudy. Sid is knocked onto a loose rock slab that is floating on a river of lava and about to plummet over the falls.

As the herd moves toward Lava Falls, Ellie goes into labor and a Guanlong pack strikes, causing a rock slide that separates her from Manny and Diego. Manny doubles back to protect her and Diego fends off further attacks, while Buck takes Crash and Eddie ahead to rescue Sid. Just as he goes over the falls, the trio swoops in on a commandeeredHarpactognathus only to been chased by a flock of Pterodactylus on the way and saves his life. Manny reaches Ellie, and there is suddenly a reaction, the cry of a newborn baby girl. He wants to name her Ellie, or Little Ellie, but Ellie instead names her Peaches after the fruit (and the codeword they had chosen to use if she went into labor during the trip). Sid is saddened at the fact that he never had a chance to say goodbye to “his” children as he returns to the herd and learns of Peaches’ birth.

Before they can leave the jungle, they are spotted by Rudy, who begins to attack them at full force; Buck lures Rudy away from the group and is nearly eaten himself, before Diego can save him. Manny, Sid, Diego, and Buck double back to trap Rudy by ensnaring him in vines. He breaks free and resumes his onslaught. The herd is saved by the timely arrival of Momma, who charges at Rudy and knocks him off a cliff before roaring her victory. As she and her children wish Sid well, Buck, now without a purpose in life since Rudy is gone, decides to join the herd and live on the surface. However, a distant roar tells him that Rudy is still alive; he changes his mind and sends the herd home, blocking off the path to the underground jungle at the same time. Manny and Ellie welcome Peaches into their frozen world and admit that Sid did a good job looking after Momma’s children. Diego decides to remain with the herd, while Buck stays underground, battling it out with Rudy.

Voice cast

Production

Blue Sky decided to do “more of a what-if adventure” in the third Ice Age installment, titled Ice Age: A New Beginning, “like finding the giant ape in King Kong or a Shangri-la in the middle of snow,” and added the dinosaurs to the story. Character designer Peter de Sève welcomed the new plot addition, since he could not think of any other giant mammal to put into the story. The “lost world” approach led to colorful dinosaurs, because “the dinosaurs didn’t have to be just brown, and you can take liberties because no one knows what color they were”, according to de Sève. Rudy’s design was inspired by the Baryonyx because of his crocodile-like look, which de Sève considered even more menacing than theT. rex.[4]

The film was released in RealD Cinema where available. The release sparked some controversy when Fox announced that it would no longer pay to supply 3D glasses to theaters,[5] which led to a number of exhibitors threatening to only show the film in standard 2D projection.[6]

The film’s original trailer debuted with the film Horton Hears a Who! on March 14, 2008, then online on April 7, 2008. There are three others that have been released, with the third and fourth (which shows Buck) being the most closely resembling each other. Queen Latifah recorded a cover of the song “Walk the Dinosaur“.

Reception

Box office

The film earned $196,573,705 in North America and $690,113,112 in other territories, which gives it a worldwide gross of $886,686,817 against a budget of $90 million. Worldwide, it is the third highest-grossing film of 2009, the highest grossing animated film of 2009, the 37th highest-grossing film of all time, the highest grossing Ice Age film, and the seventh highest-grossing animated film of all time.[7] It is also the highest-grossing animated film of 2009 worldwide.[8] It set a worldwide opening weekend record for ananimated feature ($218.4 million), previously held by The Simpsons Movie ($170.9 million). It marks the highest grossing film of the Ice Age series,[9] the second highest-grossing film of 20th Century Fox for 2009 (after Avatar) and stands as the studio’s third largest film of all time behind the latter and Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace.[10]

North America

The film made $13,791,157 on its opening day in 4,099 theaters.[1] It reached $41,690,382 on its first weekend, marking the least-grossing first weekend for the franchise, although it had a Wednesday release and therefore burned off attendance until the weekend.[9][11] The film became 20th Century Fox’s third largest 2009 release in North America behind Avatar and Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Squeakquel. It is the third-highest-grossing animated feature of 2009. It heavily out-grossed its predecessor, Ice Age: The Meltdown which earned $195,330,621 three years before,[9] to become the highest-grossing movie in the franchise, but it was way behind the two first Ice Age movies in estimated attendance.[12]

Other territories

On its opening weekend it earned $151.7 million, which is the biggest opening for an animated feature[13] and the 13th largest of all time.[14] Outside North America, it is the fifteenth highest-grossing film of all time[8] and the second highest-grossing animated movie of all time (out-grossing Finding Nemo, later out-grossed by Frozen).[15] Its highest-grossing market after North America was Germany ($82.2 million), followed by France and the Maghreb region ($69.2 million), and the UK, Ireland and Malta ($56.9 million).[16] It was the highest-grossing animated film of the year in all major countries, except Spain[17] and Australia.[12][18]

As of March 2012 it is the highest-grossing animated film of all time in Hungary,[19] Slovakia,[20] the Czech Republic,[21] Romania,[22] Bulgaria, where the film holds the opening-weekend record,[23] Finland,[24] Norway,[25] Denmark,[26] Estonia,[27] Latvia,[28] Lithuania,[29] Italy,[30] Greece,[31] Serbia and Montenegro,[32] Slovenia,[33] Croatia,[34] France and the Maghreb region,[35] the Netherlands,[36] Germany,[37] Austria,[38] Brazil,[39] Peru,[40] Uruguay[41] and Venezuela.[42]

Critical respon

The film received mixed reviews from critics. As of June 27, 2011, Rotten Tomatoes reported that 45% of critics gave positive reviews based on 157 reviews with an average score of 5.4/10.[43] Another review aggregator, Metacritic, which assigns a normalized rating out of 100 top reviews from mainstream critics, gives the film an average score of 50 based on 25 reviews.[44]

However, Roger Ebert gave the film three and a half stars out of four claiming that “Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs is the best of the three films about our friends in the inter-species herd of plucky prehistoric heroes. And it involves some of the best use of 3-D I’ve seen in an animated feature.”[45] Lou Lumenik of the New York Post awarded the film 3 stars stating that the film is “much more of an emphasis on action in this nicely crafted, fast-paced sequel.”[46] Keith Phipps of the A.V. Club graded the film a C+ claiming the sequel “throws its commitment to the era away with movie number three, a ploy sure to anger Ice Age purists everywhere.”[47] Carrie Rickey of the Philadelphia Inquirer enjoyed the “film’s animation art is Seuss-imaginative”, but panned “the flatness of the story and indifferent voicework all the more obvious.”[48]

CinemaScore polls conducted during the opening weekend, cinema audiences gave Dawn of the Dinosaurs an average grade of “A-” on an A+ to F scale.[49]

Home media

Ice Age: Dawn of the Dinosaurs was released on high-definition Blu-ray Disc and standard DVD in North America on October 27, 2009 and in the United Kingdom on November 23, 2009. Two versions of the DVD exist: a single-disc DVD, and a “Scrat Pack” Double DVD Pack with three Scrat games.

The 3-disc Blu-ray combo pack includes a Blu-ray, the single-disc DVD, and a Digital Copy, as well as an Ice Age digital story book maker, commentary by director Carlos Saldanha, deleted scenes, making-of featurettes, the two Scrat shorts: Gone Nutty and No Time for Nuts (that each originally came on home video for both the first and second films), and a how-to-draw Scrat tutorial with the filmmakers.

On September 21, 2010, a 3D DVD was released as a two-disc set, with the first disc being the TrioScopics 3D (green-magenta anaglyph) version and the second disc being the 2D version.

No 34 highest grossing Film in all time

The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
This article is about the 2002 live-action film. For the book from which it was adapted, see The Two Towers. For other uses, see The Two Towers (disambiguation).
The Lord of the Rings:
The Two Towers
Lord of the Rings - The Two Towers.jpg

Theatrical release poster
Directed by Peter Jackson
Produced by
Screenplay by
Based on The Two Towers 
by J. R. R. Tolkien
Starring
Music by Howard Shore
Cinematography Andrew Lesnie
Edited by
Production
companies
Distributed by New Line Cinema
Release dates
Running time
179 minutes[1]
Country
Language English
Budget $94 million[5]
Box office $926 million[5]

The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers is a 2002 epic high fantasy film[6][7] directed by Peter Jackson and based on the second volume of J. R. R. Tolkien‘s novel The Lord of the Rings. It is the second installment in The Lord of the Rings film series, preceded by The Fellowship of the Ring (2001) and concluding with The Return of the King (2003).

Continuing the plot of The Fellowship of the Ring, the film intercuts three storylines. Frodo and Sam continue their journey towardsMordor to destroy the One Ring, meeting and joined by Gollum, the ring’s former owner. Aragorn, Legolas, and Gimli come to the war-torn nation of Rohan and are reunited with the resurrected Gandalf, before fighting at the Battle of Helm’s Deep. Merry andPippin escape capture, meet Treebeard the Ent, and help to plan an attack on Isengard.

Meeting high critical acclaim, the film was an enormous box-office success, earning over $926 million worldwide and is currently the33rd highest-grossing film of all time (inflation-adjusted, it is the 62nd most successful film in North America[8]). The film won numerous accolades and was nominated for six Academy Awards, winning two.

Plot

Frodo Baggins and Samwise Gamgee continue their journey to Mordor to destroy the One Ring by throwing it into Mount Doom. They are attacked in the night by Gollum, former owner of the Ring, but they capture him. Sympathising with Gollum for their shared burden, Frodo asks Gollum to lead them safely to Mordor, despite Sam’s objections. Meanwhile, Aragorn, Legolas, and Gimlipursue the Uruk-hai who kidnapped their friends Merry and Pippin. The Uruk-hai are slaughtered by the Rohirrim army of Rohan, but the two Hobbits escape into Fangorn Forest where they meet the Ent Treebeard. Aragorn’s group later meet the Rohirrim who have been banished by their king Théoden, who is manipulated by Saruman’s servant Grima Wormtongue. Tracking the Hobbits in Fangorn, Aragorn’s group encounter a resurrected Gandalf who perished in Moria, but was revived to help save Middle Earth.

Gollum leads Frodo and Sam through the Dead Marshes whilst evading the Nazgûl. They reach the Black Gate to Mordor but Gollum stops them, saying it’s too risky and that there is another entrance, finding himself becoming loyal to Frodo for his kindness. The trio later are captured by the Rangers of Ithilien, led by Faramir, brother of the late Boromir. When Faramir discovers Frodo has the Ring, he intends on taking him to Gondor, capturing Gollum when Frodo exposes him. Aragorn, Gandalf, Legolas, and Gimli travel to Rohan’s capital Edoras where Gandalf releases Théoden from Saruman’s power and Wormtongue is banished. Learning Saruman plans on wiping out Rohan with an army of Uruk-hai, Théoden decides to move his citizens to the protection of Helm’s Deep, but Gandalf departs to find the Rohirrim led by Théoden’s nephew Éomer. Aragorn strikes up a friendship with Théoden’s niece Éowyn who quickly falls in love with him. During a Warg attack, Aragorn falls off a cliff into a river, but is found by his horse and taken to Helm’s Deep.

In Fangorn, Merry and Pippin attend an Ent council but learn Treebeard and the others will not participate in the war. They convince them otherwise when they show the destruction Saruman has unleashed on the forests around Isengard. The Ents storm Isengard and take Saruman captive. The Uruk-hai army arrive at Helm’s Deep, finding a makeshift army of peasants and Elves fromRivendell waiting for them. A great battle follows with Théoden losing hope until Aragorn convinces him to ride out and meet them. Gandalf and the Rohirrim arrive, turning the tide of the battle and destroying the Uruk-hai.

Frodo, Sam, and Gollum are taken to the fallen Gondor city Osgiliath but they are attacked by the Nazgûl and Mordor army. Sam informs Faramir of how the Ring nearly drove Boromir mad, stunning Faramir. Frodo is nearly captured by the Nazgûl but Sam tackles him down a flight of stairs, prompting Frodo to nearly kill him until recognising him. After the attack ends, Faramir frees the trio and sends them on their way. Gollum, hurt by Frodo’s betrayal, decides to reclaim the Ring by leading Frodo and Sam to a creature he refers to as “her”, leading them away towards Mordor.

Cast

 

From left to right: Karl Urban,Bernard Hill, Ian McKellen, Orlando Bloom, and Viggo Mortensen. According to Peter Jackson, The Two Towers is centered around Aragorn.[9]

Like the other films in the series, The Two Towers has an ensemble cast,[10] and the cast and their respective characters include:

The following appear only in the Extended Edition

In the Battle of Helm’s Deep, Peter Jackson has a cameo appearance as one of the men on top of the gate, throwing a spear at the attacking Uruk-hai. His children and Elijah Wood‘s sister also cameo as young refugees in the caves behind the Hornburg, and Alan Lee and Dan Hennah also cameo as soldiers preparing for the battle. The son of a producer’s friend, Hamish Duncan, appears as a reluctant young Rohirrim warrior. Daniel Falconer has a cameo as an Elvish archer at the battle.[12]

Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince (film)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince
Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince poster.jpg

Theatrical release poster
Directed by David Yates
Produced by
Screenplay by Steve Kloves
Based on Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince 
by J. K. Rowling
Starring Daniel Radcliffe
Rupert Grint
Emma Watson
Music by Nicholas Hooper
Cinematography Bruno Delbonnel
Edited by Mark Day
Production
company
Distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures
Release dates
  • 6 July 2009(Tokyo premiere)[1]
  • 7 July 2009(London premiere)
  • 15 July 2009(United Kingdom)
  • 15 July 2009 (United States)
Running time
153 minutes[2]
Country
  • United Kingdom
  • United States
Language English
Budget $250 million[3]
Box office $934.4 million[4]

Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince is a 2009 fantasy film directed by David Yates and distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures.[4]It is based on the novel of the same name by J. K. Rowling. The film, which is the sixth instalment in the Harry Potter film series, was written by Steve Kloves and produced by David Heyman and David Barron.[5] The story follows Harry Potter‘s sixth year atHogwarts as he becomes obsessed with a mysterious textbook, falls in love, and attempts to retrieve a memory that holds the key to Lord Voldemort‘s downfall.

The film stars Daniel Radcliffe as Harry Potter, alongside Rupert Grint and Emma Watson as Harry’s best friends Ron Weasley andHermione Granger. It is the sequel to Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix and is followed by Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 1. Filming began on 24 September 2007, leading to the film’s worldwide cinematic release on 15 July 2009, one day short of the fourth anniversary of the corresponding novel’s release. The film was simultaneously released in regular cinemas andIMAX 3D everywhere except North America, where its IMAX release was delayed for two weeks.[6]

Half-Blood Prince opened to positive reviews along with immediate commercial success, breaking the record for the biggest single-day worldwide gross. In five days the film made $394 million, breaking the record for highest five-day worldwide gross. With a total gross of $934 million, it became the 8th-highest-grossing movie of all time[7] and the second-highest-grossing film of 2009 (behindAvatar). It is currently the 33rd-highest-grossing film of all time worldwide unadjusted for inflation.[8] It is the fifth-highest-grossing film in the franchise.

The film attained a mix of awards and nominations, including gaining recognition at the 82nd Academy Awards for Best Cinematography[9] and the 63rd British Academy Film Awards for Best Special Visual Effects and Best Production Design.[10] Half-Blood Prince remains one of the most positively reviewed films within the series among film critics; at the time of its release, it became the third-highest-rated Harry Potter film on review aggregators Rotten Tomatoes and Metacritic. Critics praised the film’s “emotionally satisfying” story, direction, cinematography, visuals and music.[11][12][13]

Plot

Further information: Plot of the novel

Lord Voldemort is tightening his grip on both the wizarding and Muggle worlds and has chosen Draco Malfoy to carry out a secret mission. Severus Snape makes an Unbreakable Vow with Draco’s mother, Narcissa, to protect Draco and fulfill the assignment if he fails.

16-year-old Harry accompanies Albus Dumbledore to visit former Potions professor Horace Slughorn, who has gone into hiding but agrees to return to teach at Hogwarts. Dumbledore then takes Harry to the Burrow, where Harry reunites with his best friends Ron Weasley and Hermione Granger. Harry believes Voldemort has made Draco a Death Eater, after seeing Draco taking part in a ceremony, but Ron and Hermione are sceptical. At Hogwarts, Harry and Ron are forced to borrow textbooks for Slughorn’s Potions class, and Harry is stuck with a copy that turns out to be filled with helpful notes, instructions, and spells left by the book’s previous owner, the “Half-Blood Prince”. Using the book, Harry excels in the class and impresses Slughorn. Ron becomes Keeper of the Gryffindor Quidditch team and forms a romantic relationship with Lavender Brown, upsetting Hermione. Harry consoles Hermione, revealing that he now has feelings for Ron’s younger sister, Ginny Weasley.

Harry spends the Christmas holidays with the Weasleys. On Christmas Eve, Bellatrix Lestrange and Fenrir Greyback set fire to the Burrow. Back at school, Ron is nearly killed when he drinks poisoned mead, a drink originally intended for Dumbledore. While recovering, Ron murmurs Hermione’s name, causing Lavender to end their relationship. Harry confronts Draco and severely injures him with a Sectumsempra curse taken from the textbook of the Half-Blood Prince. Snape enters and quickly heals Draco’s wound. Fearing the book may be filled with more Dark Magic, Ginny and Harry hide it in the Room of Requirement and share their first kiss.

Dumbledore shows Harry memories of a young Tom Riddle and reveals that Slughorn retains a memory critical to Voldemort’s defeat. Harry eventually succeeds in retrieving the memory, and learns that Voldemort wanted information for creating Horcruxes, objects that contain pieces of his soul. In the memory, Tom asked if dividing his soul into seven pieces was possible. Dumbledore concludes that Voldemort eventually did this, and two of his Horcruxes have already been destroyed: Tom Riddle’s diary and Marvolo Gaunt’s ring. After discovering the possible location of another Horcrux, Harry and Dumbledore travel to a seaside cave where Harry is forced to make Dumbledore drink a painful potion that hides the Horcrux, a locket. A weakened Dumbledore defends them from Inferi and Apparates back to Hogwarts, where Bellatrix, Greyback and more Death Eaters have entered with Draco’s help through a Vanishing Cabinet.

Dumbledore instructs Harry to hide as Draco arrives and reveals that he has been chosen by Voldemort to kill Dumbledore. However, he is unable to bring himself to do it, and Snape casts the Avada Kedavra curse instead, killing Dumbledore. Harry attempts to curse Snape but Snape overpowers him and reveals that he is the Half-Blood Prince. Harry returns to the school to find the staff and students mourning Dumbledore. Harry later reveals to Ron and Hermione that the locket Horcrux was a fake. The locket contains a message from “R.A.B.“, stating that he has stolen the real Horcrux with the intent of destroying it. Rather than return for their final year at Hogwarts, Harry, Ron and Hermione vow to seek out and destroy the remaining Horcruxes.

Cast

Production

Development

Before David Yates was officially chosen to direct the film, many directors had expressed an interest in taking the helm. Alfonso Cuarón, the director of the third film, stated he “would love to have the opportunity” to return.[14] Goblet of Fire director Mike Newell declined a spot to direct the fifth film, and was not approached for this one.[15] Terry Gilliamwas Rowling’s personal choice to direct Philosopher’s Stone. When asked whether he would consider directing a later film, Gilliam said, “Warner Bros. had their chance the first time around, and they blew it.”[16]

In an interview with Dark Horizons, Yates said that “I was still working on Order of the Phoenix when they asked me to do Half-Blood Prince. So they were really delighted with the material that they were seeing while we were in post-production, and the conversations happened before the movie was released, because I had to start pre-production on it while Order of the Phoenix was being promoted. It was just something they see in the work that they really liked, and responded to.”[17] Yates described Half-Blood Prince as being “a cross between the chills of Prisoner of Azkaban and the fantastical adventure of Goblet of Fire.”[18]

Emma Watson considered not returning for the film,[19] but eventually decided that, “the pluses outweighed the minuses,” and could not bear to see anyone else play Hermione. Composer Nicholas Hooper returned from the last film; he included a reworking of John Williams‘s Hedwig’s Theme, which has recurred in all scores. Also maintained werecostume designer Jany Temime, visual effects supervisor Tim Burke, creature and make-up effects designer Nick Dudman, and special effects supervisor John Richardson from the third film.[20]

Yates and Heyman have noted that some of the events of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows influenced the script of Half-Blood Prince.[21]

No 32 highest grossing Film in all time

Finding Nemo

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
For the franchise, see Finding Nemo (franchise).
Finding Nemo
Finding Nemo.jpg

Theatrical release poster
Directed by Andrew Stanton
Produced by Graham Walters
Screenplay by Andrew Stanton
Bob Peterson
David Reynolds
Story by Andrew Stanton
Starring
Music by Thomas Newman
Cinematography Sharon Calahan
Jeremy Lasky
Edited by David Ian Salter
Production
company
Distributed by Buena Vista Pictures
Release dates
  • May 30, 2003
Running time
100 minutes
Country United States
Language English
Budget $94 million[1]
Box office $936.7 million[1]

Finding Nemo is a 2003 American computer-animated comedy-drama adventure film produced by Pixar and released by Walt Disney Pictures. Written and directed by Andrew Stanton, it tells the story of the overprotective clownfish named Marlin who, along with a regal tang named Dory, searches for his abducted son Nemo all the way to Sydney Harbour. Along the way, Marlin learns to take risks and let Nemo take care of himself.

Originally released on May 30, 2003, the film was eventually re-released in 3D on September 14, 2012, and it was released on Blu-ray on December 4, 2012. The film received widespread critical acclaim, won the Academy Award for Best Animated Feature, and was nominated in three more categories including Best Original Screenplay. It was the second highest-grossing film of 2003, earning a total of $936 million worldwide.[1] Finding Nemo is the best-selling DVD of all time, with over 40 million copies sold as of 2006,[2] and was the highest-grossing G-rated film of all time before Pixar’s own Toy Story 3 overtook it. It is the 31st highest-grossing film of all time, as well as the 5th highest-grossing animated film. In 2008, the American Film Institute named it the 10th greatest animated film ever made as part of their 10 Top 10 lists.[3] A sequel, Finding Dory, is in production, set to be released on June 17, 2016.[4]

Plot

Two ocellaris clownfish, Marlin and his wife Coral, admire their new home in the Great Barrier Reef and their clutch of eggs when abarracuda attacks, knocking Marlin unconscious. He wakes up to find that Coral and all but one of the eggs have disappeared. Marlin names this last egg Nemo, a name that Coral liked.

Nemo develops a smaller right fin as a result of damage to his egg during the attack, which limits his swimming ability. Worried about Nemo’s safety, Marlin embarrasses Nemo during a school field trip. Nemo sneaks away from the reef and is captured by scuba divers. As the boat departs, a diver accidentally knocks his diving mask overboard. While attempting to save Nemo, Marlin meets Dory, a good-hearted and optimistic regal blue tang with short-term memory loss. Marlin and Dory meet three sharks – Bruce, Anchor and Chum – who are trying to make friends with fish in an old minefield. Marlin discovers the diver’s mask and notices an address written on it. When he argues with Dory and accidentally gives her a nosebleed, the blood scent causes Bruce to enter an uncontrollable feeding frenzy. The pair escape from Bruce but the mask falls into a trench in the deep sea.

During a hazardous struggle with an anglerfish in the trench, Dory sees the diving mask and reads the address located in Sydney, Australia. The pair swim on, receiving directions to Sydney from a school of moonfish. Marlin and Dory encounter a bloom of jellyfish that nearly kills them. Marlin loses consciousness and wakes up on a sea turtlenamed Crush, who takes Marlin and Dory on the East Australian Current. Marlin tells the details of his long journey with a group of sea turtles, and his story is spread across the ocean. He also sees how Crush gets on well with his son Squirt.

Meanwhile, Nemo is placed in a fish tank in the office of a dentist named Phillip Sherman on Sydney Harbour. He meets aquarium fish called the Tank Gang, led by a moorish idol named Gill, who has a broken fin. The Tank Gang includes Bloat, a puffer fish; Bubbles, a yellow tang; Peach, an ochre starfish; Gurgle, a royal gramma; Jacques, a pacific cleaner shrimp; and Deb, a blacktailed humbug.

The fish learn that Nemo is to be given to Sherman’s niece, Darla, who killed a fish by constantly shaking its bag. Gill then reveals his plan to escape, jamming the tank’s filter, forcing the dentist to remove the fish to clean it. The fish would be placed in plastic bags, and then they would roll out the window and into the harbor. After an attempt at the escape goes wrong, a brown pelican, Nigel, brings news of Marlin’s adventure. Inspired by his father’s determination, Nemo successfully jams the filter, but the dentist installs a new high-tech filter before they can escape.

After leaving the East Australian Current, Marlin and Dory are engulfed by a blue whale. Inside the whale’s mouth, Dory communicates with the whale, which carries them to Port Jackson and expels them through his blowhole. They meet Nigel, who recognizes Marlin from the stories he has heard, and he takes them to Sherman’s office. Darla has just arrived and the dentist is handing Nemo to her. Nemo plays dead to save himself as Nigel arrives. Marlin sees Nemo and believes he is dead before Nigel is thrown out. In despair, Marlin leaves Dory and begins to swim home. Gill then helps Nemo escape into a drain that leads to the ocean. Dory loses her memory and becomes confused, and meets Nemo, who reached the ocean. Eventually, Dory’s memory returns after she reads the word “Sydney” on a drainpipe. She directs Nemo to Marlin and they reunite, but then Dory is caught in a fishing net with a school of grouper. Nemo enters the net and orders the group to swim downward to break the net, enabling them to escape. After returning home, Nemo leaves for school, with Crush’s son Squirt, and Marlin, no longer overprotective, proudly watches Nemo swim away with Dory at his side.

At the dentist’s office, the high-tech filter breaks down and the Tank Gang escapes into the harbor, belatedly realizing they are still confined in plastic bags.

Voice cast

Production

The inspiration for Nemo sprang from multiple experiences, going back to when director Andrew Stanton was a child, when he loved going to the dentist to see the fish tank, assuming that the fish were from the ocean and wanted to go home.[5] In 1992, shortly after his son was born, he and his family took a trip to Six Flags Discovery Kingdom (which was called Marine World at the time). There, after seeing the shark tube and various exhibits, he felt that the underwater world could be done beautifully in computer animation.[6]Later, in 1997, he took his son for a walk in the park, but realized that he was over protecting him and lost an opportunity to have a father-son experience that day.[5]

In an interview with National Geographic magazine, he said that the idea for the characters of Marlin and Nemo came from a photograph of two clownfish peeking out of ananemone:

It was so arresting. I had no idea what kind of fish they were, but I couldn’t take my eyes off them. And as an entertainer, the fact that they were called clownfish — it was perfect. There’s almost nothing more appealing than these little fish that want to play peekaboo with you.[7]

In addition, clownfish are colourful, but do not tend to come out of an anemone often. For a character who has to go on a dangerous journey, Stanton felt a clownfish was the perfect type of fish for the character.[5] Pre-production of the film began in early 1997. Stanton began writing the screenplay during the post-production of A Bug’s Life. As a result,Finding Nemo began production with a complete screenplay, something that co-director Lee Unkrich called “very unusual for an animated film”.[5] The artists took scuba divinglessons to study the coral reef.[5]

 

Andrew Stanton co-wrote and directed the film.

The idea for the initiation sequence came from a story conference between Andrew Stanton and Bob Peterson while they were driving to record the actors. Stanton was inspired to cast Ellen DeGeneres when he watched an episode of Ellen in which he saw her “change the subject five times before finishing one sentence”.[5] The pelican character named Gerald (who in the final film ends up swallowing and choking on Marlin and Dory) was originally a friend of Nigel. They were going to play against each other with Nigel being neat and fastidious and Gerald being scruffy and sloppy. The filmmakers could not find an appropriate scene for them that did not slow the pace of the picture, so Gerald’s character was minimized.[5]

Stanton himself provided the voice of Crush the sea turtle. He originally did the voice for the film’s story reel, and assumed they would find an actor later. When Stanton’s performance became popular in test screenings, he decided to keep his performance in the film. He recorded all his dialogue while lying on a sofa in co-director Lee Unkrich’s office.[5] Crush’s son Squirt was voiced by Nicholas Bird, the young son of fellow Pixar director Brad Bird. According to Stanton, the elder Bird was playing a tape recording of his young son around the Pixar studios one day. Stanton felt the voice was “this generation’s Thumper” and immediately cast Nicholas.[5]

Megan Mullally was originally going to provide a voice in the film. According to Mullally, the producers were dissatisfied to learn that the voice of her character Karen Walker on the television show Will & Grace was not her natural speaking voice. The producers hired her anyway, and then strongly encouraged her to use her Karen Walker voice for the role. When Mullally refused, she was dismissed.[8] To ensure that the movements of the fish in the film were believable, the animators took a crash course in fish biology and oceanography. They visited aquariums, went diving in Hawaii and received in-house lectures from anichthyologist.[9] As a result, Pixar’s animator for Dory, Gini Cruz Santos, integrated “the fish movement, human movement, and facial expressions to make them look and feel like real characters.”[10][11]

The film was dedicated to Glenn McQueen, a Pixar animator who died of melanoma in October 2002.[12] Finding Nemo shares many plot elements with Pierrot the Clownfish, a children’s book published in 2002, but conceived in 1995. The author, Franck Le Calvez, sued Disney for infringement of his intellectual rights. The judge ruled against him, citing the color differences between Pierrot and Nemo.[13]

 

Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix (film)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix
Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix poster.jpg

British release poster
Directed by David Yates
Produced by David Heyman
David Barron
Screenplay by Michael Goldenberg
Based on Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix 
by J. K. Rowling
Starring Daniel Radcliffe
Rupert Grint
Emma Watson
(See below)
Music by Nicholas Hooper
Cinematography Sławomir Idziak
Edited by Mark Day
Production
company
Distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures
Release dates
  • 3 July 2007(London premiere)
  • 11 July 2007(North America)
  • 12 July 2007(United Kingdom)
Running time
138 minutes[1]
Country United Kingdom
United States
Language English
Budget $150 million[2]
Box office $939.9 million[2]

Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix is a 2007 fantasy film directed by David Yates and distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures.[2] It is based on the novel of the same name by J. K. Rowling. The film, which is the fifth instalment in the Harry Potter film series, was written by Michael Goldenberg (making this the only film in the series not to be scripted by Steve Kloves) and produced by David Heyman and David Barron. The story follows Harry Potter‘s fifth year at Hogwarts as the Ministry of Magic is in denial ofLord Voldemort‘s return.

The film stars Daniel Radcliffe as Harry Potter, alongside Rupert Grint and Emma Watson as Harry’s best friends Ron Weasley andHermione Granger. It is the sequel to Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire and is followed by Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince.

Live-action filming took place in England and Scotland for exterior locations and Leavesden Film Studios in Watford for interior locations from February to November 2006, with a one-month break in June. Post-production on the film continued for several months afterwards to add in visual effects. The film’s budget was reportedly between £75 and 100 million ($150–200 million).[3][4]Warner Bros. released the film in the United Kingdom on 12 July 2007 and in North America on 11 July, both in conventional andIMAX theatres; it is the first Potter film to be released in IMAX 3D.

Order of the Phoenix is the unadjusted 30th highest-grossing film of all time, and a critical and commercial success, acclaimed as “the best one yet”[5] by Rowling, who has consistently offered praise for the film adaptations of her work.[6][7][8] The film opened to aworldwide 5-day opening of $333 million, fourth all-time, and grossed nearly $940 million total, second to Pirates of the Caribbean: At World’s End for the greatest total of 2007.[9][10] The film was nominated for two BAFTA Film Awards in 2008.

Plot

Further information: Plot of the novel

Harry Potter is forced to defend himself against charges of using magic while underage, and in the presence of his Muggle cousin Dudley, after the two are attacked by Dementors. The Order of the Phoenix, a secret organisation founded by Albus Dumbledore, inform the now pending expulsion Harry that the Ministry of Magic is oblivious to Lord Voldemort‘s return; under the Ministry’s influence, The Daily Prophet has launched a smear campaign towards Harry and Dumbledore following Harry’s encounter with Voldemort at the end of the previous year. This encounter had a huge psychological effect on Harry – he has nightmares not only about what happened in the graveyard but also about the Department of Mysteries at the Ministry of Magic. While at the Order’s headquarters, Harry’s godfather, Sirius Black, mentions that Voldemort is after an object which he did not have last time.

Upon arrival at Hogwarts, Harry learns that Minister for Magic Cornelius Fudge has appointed a new Defence Against the Dark Arts professor: Dolores Umbridge, a senior Ministry official who refuses to teach practical magic due to her belief that Dumbledore is forming a rebellion against the Ministry. Umbridge and Harry immediately clash, as she is oblivious to Voldemort’s return and punishes Harry for his “lies” by forcing him to write a message with a magic quill, causing the words “I must not tell lies” to be carved into the back of his hand. When Ron and Hermione notice Harry’s scars, they are outraged but he refuses to go to Dumbledore, who has distanced himself from Harry since the summer. As Umbridge’s control over the school increases, Ron and Hermione aid Harry in forming a secret group to train students in defensive spells, calling themselves “Dumbledore’s Army“. The Slytherin students are recruited by Umbridge to expose the group. Meanwhile, Harry and Cho Chang develop romantic feelings for each other and begin a relationship during Christmas, Cho being Harry’s first kiss at the last DA meeting before the holidays. However, Harry worries that his increasingly erratic behaviour is becoming more like Voldemort’s.

Harry has a vision involving an attack upon Arthur Weasley in the Department of Mysteries, from the point of view of Arthur’s attacker. Concerned that Voldemort will exploit this connection to Harry, Dumbledore instructs Professor Snape to give Harry Occlumency lessons to defend his mind from Voldemort’s influence. These lessons increase Harry’s psychological problems, as he is forced to relive all his bad experiences. The connection between Harry and Voldemort leads Harry to further isolate himself from his friends. Meanwhile, Bellatrix Lestrange, Sirius’ deranged cousin, escapes from Azkaban along with nine other Death Eaters. At Hogwarts, Umbridge and her Inquisitorial Squad uncover Dumbledore’s Army after illegally interrogating Cho with Veritaserum (unbeknownst to Harry and the rest of the group). Dumbledore covers up for Harry, but escapes as Fudge orders his arrest. With Dumbledore gone, Umbridge becomes the new Headmistress and exercises even stricter control over the campus. Harry’s relationship with Cho falls apart, as he believes she betrayed Dumbledore’s Army to Umbridge. During Occlumency lessons, Harry finally snaps and deflects the spell back on Snape, allowing Harry to discover through Snape’s memories why he hated Harry’s father James, who often bullied him. Enraged that Harry has witnessed these memories, Snape ends the lessons.

During an Ordinary Wizarding Level (O.W.L.) exam, the Weasley twins finally revolt and set off fireworks in the Great Hall, causing chaos for Umbridge. During this event, Harry has a vision of Sirius being tortured by Voldemort within the Department of Mysteries. Harry, Ron and Hermione rush to Umbridge’s fireplace to alert the Order via the Floo Network, since hers is the only fireplace not being monitored, but Umbridge stops them before they can do so. When she tortures Harry and threatens to use the Cruciatus Curseto get information out of Him about the trio’s intentions, Hermione tricks Umbridge into entering the Forbidden Forest in search of Dumbledore’s “secret weapon”. She and Harry lead her to the hiding place of Hagrid’s half-giant brother, Grawp, only to be confronted by centaurs who kidnap Umbridge after she attacks them. Harry, Hermione, Ron, Luna,Neville and Ginny fly to the Ministry of Magic on Thestrals in an attempt to save Sirius.

The six enter the Department of Mysteries where they uncover a bottled prophecy involving Harry and Voldemort, the object Voldemort was after. However, they are ambushed by Death Eaters including Lucius Malfoy and Bellatrix Lestrange. Lucius reveals that Harry only saw a dream of Sirius being tortured; it was a method to lure Harry into the Death Eaters’ grasp, not an actual situation. Lucius attempts to persuade Harry to give him the prophecy, telling him it will reveal why Voldemort couldn’t kill Harry when he was an infant. Harry refuses and a fight between Dumbledore’s Army and the Death Eaters ensues. The Death Eaters take everyone except Harry as hostages, threatening to kill them unless he surrenders the prophecy.

Harry obliges just as Sirius and Remus Lupin arrive with Order members Nymphadora Tonks, Kingsley Shacklebolt and Mad-Eye Moody. They attack the Death Eaters, attempting to rescue the members of Dumbledore’s Army. In the midst of the battle, Lucius drops the prophecy, destroying it. Harry and Sirius duel him. Just as Sirius overpowers Lucius, Bellatrix kills Sirius. Despite Remus trying to hold him back, Harry goes after Bellatrix. Harry chases and corners Bellatrix in the Atrium and attempts to perform theCruciatus Curse on her, but to little avail (it knocks her down). Voldemort appears, but Dumbledore arrives through the Floo Network moments before Voldemort can kill Harry.

A huge duel between Voldemort and Dumbledore ensues, destroying much of the Atrium, while Bellatrix escapes. After the two prove evenly matched, Voldemort possesses Harry to try to get Dumbledore to sacrifice Harry in the hope of killing him, but the love Harry feels for his friends and Sirius makes it impossible for Voldemort to remain in his body. Ministry officials arrive before Voldemort disapparates; Fudge is forced to admit that Voldemort has returned and resigns as Minister. Umbridge is finally removed from Hogwarts. Dumbledore returns as headmaster of Hogwarts after he and Harry are exonerated. Dumbledore explains that he distanced himself from Harry throughout the year hoping it would lessen the risk of Voldemort using their connection. Harry comes to terms with the prophecy; “Neither can live while the other survives.”

As Harry and his friends head towards the Hogwarts Express, Harry tells his friends that even though a war is beginning, unlike Voldemort, they have something worth fighting for.

The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
The Hobbit:
The Battle of the Five Armies
The Hobbit - The Battle of the Five Armies.jpg

Theatrical release poster
Directed by Peter Jackson
Produced by
Screenplay by
Based on The Hobbit 
by J. R. R. Tolkien
Starring
Music by Howard Shore
Cinematography Andrew Lesnie
Edited by Jabez Olssen
Production
companies
Distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures
Release dates
  • 1 December 2014(London premiere)
  • 11 December 2014(New Zealand)
  • 17 December 2014(United States)
Running time
144 minutes[1]
Country
  • New Zealand[2]
  • United States
Language English
Budget $250 million[3]
Box office $956 million[4]

The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies is a 2014 high fantasy adventure film, directed by Peter Jackson and written by Jackson, Fran Walsh, Philippa Boyens, and Guillermo del Toro. It is the third and final installment in Peter Jackson’s three-part film adaptation based on the novel The Hobbit by J. R. R. Tolkien, following An Unexpected Journey (2012) and The Desolation of Smaug (2013), and together they act as a prequel to Jackson’s The Lord of the Rings film trilogy.

Produced by New Line Cinema, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer and WingNut Films, and distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures, The Battle of the Five Armies was released on 11 December 2014 in New Zealand, 12 December 2014 in the United Kingdom and on 17 December 2014 in the United States.

It stars Martin Freeman, Ian McKellen, Richard Armitage, Evangeline Lilly, Lee Pace, Luke Evans, Benedict Cumberbatch, Ken Stottand James Nesbitt. It also features Cate Blanchett, Ian Holm, Christopher Lee, Hugo Weaving and Orlando Bloom.

The film grossed over $956 million worldwide, making it the second highest-grossing film of 2014 and the 30th highest-grossing film of all time. At the 87th Academy Awards, the film received a nomination for Best Sound Editing.

Plot

Bilbo and the Dwarves watch from the Lonely Mountain as the dragon Smaug sets Laketown ablaze, and its people flee. Bard the Bowman breaks out of prison, and eventually kills Smaug with the black arrow brought to him by his son Bain. Smaug’s falling body crushes the fleeing Master of Laketown, who was escaping Laketown on a boat laden with the town’s gold. Bard reluctantly becomes the new leader of the Laketown people as they seek refuge in the ruins of Dale, while Legolas travels to investigate Mount Gundabad with Tauriel. Thorin, now struck with “dragon sickness” over the vast treasure in the mountain, searches obsessively for the Arkenstone, which Bilbo had previously found but kept hidden. Thorin, hearing that people have come to Dale, orders the entrance of the Lonely Mountain sealed off.

Meanwhile, Galadriel, Elrond and Saruman arrive at Dol Guldur and free Gandalf, sending him to safety with Radagast. They battle and defeat the Nazgûl and Sauron himself, banishing them to the East. Azog, marching on Erebor with his vast Orc army, sendsBolg to Gundabad to summon their second army. Legolas and Tauriel witness the march of Bolg’s army, bolstered by Orc Berserkers and giant bats.

Thranduil and an elf army arrive in Dale and they form an alliance with Bard in order to re-claim white gems that are part of the Mountain treasure. Bard goes to the mountain and asks Thorin for the share of the gold that he had previously promised the people of Laketown, but Thorin refuses. Gandalf arrives at Dale to warn Bard and Thranduil of the threat posed by Azog, but Thranduil dismisses him. Bilbo sneaks out of Erebor to hand the Arkenstone over to Thranduil and Bard, so that they can trade it for the gems and gold they believe is theirs, preventing the need for a battle. When Bard and Thranduil’s armies gather at the gates of Erebor, offering to trade the Arkenstone for the white gems and gold, Thorin angrily refuses to believe they have the Arkenstone until Bilbo admits giving away the Arkenstone, and chides Thorin for letting greed cloud his judgement. Outraged by what he sees as betrayal, Thorin nearly kills Bilbo, but Gandalf arrives at the gate and shames Thorin into releasing Bilbo. Thorin’s cousin Dáin arrives with his Dwarf army, and a battle of Dwarves against Elves and Men is imminent. Wereworms emerge from the ground, releasing Azog’s army from their tunnels. With the Orcs outnumbering Dáin’s army, Thranduil and Bard’s forces, along with Gandalf and Bilbo, join the battle. However, a second front is opened when many Orcs, Ogres, and Trolls attack Dale.

Inside Erebor, Thorin suffers traumatic hallucinations before regaining his sanity and leading his company to join the battle. He rides towards Ravenhill with Dwalin, Fíli and Kíli to kill Azog; Bilbo follows them using the One Ring. Meanwhile, Tauriel leaves with Legolas to warn the Dwarves of Bolg’s approaching army. Fíli and Kíli are cornered, and Azog executes Fíli, as Bilbo and the other Dwarves look on. As Thorin engages Azog in a fight to the death, Bolg knocks Bilbo unconscious, overpowers Tauriel and then kills Kíli, who had come to her aid. Legolas battles Bolg, eventually killing him. Thorin kills Azog, but is mortally wounded in the process. The Great Eagles then arrive with Radagast and Beornto fight the newly arriving Orc army, and the Orcs are finally destroyed. Bilbo regains consciousness, and makes peace with a dying Thorin. Legolas tells Thranduil he must leave, and Thranduil advises him to seek out a Dunedain ranger in the north who goes by the name “Strider”.

Bilbo bids farewell to the remaining members of Thorin’s company and journeys home to the Shire with Gandalf. As the two part ways on the outskirts of the Shire, Gandalf admits his knowledge of Bilbo’s ring, and tells him that magic rings are not to be used lightly. Bilbo returns to Bag End to find his belongings being auctioned off by relatives because he was presumed dead. He aborts the sale but finds his home pillaged.

Sixty years later, Bilbo receives a visit from Gandalf, thus setting in motion the events of The Fellowship of the Ring.

Cast

 

The Battle of the Five Armies panel at 2014 SDCC

Additionally, Peter Jackson and Andy Serkis‘ daughters made cameo appearances as girls rowing away during Smaug‘s attack; movement coach Terry Notary and stand-inJamie Haugh appear as a Laketown refugees after the destruction; Conan Stevens, who played Bolg in the first film, appears as the Keeper of the Dungeons, an Orc captain holding Gandalf hostage; Dominic Monaghan, who played Meriadoc Brandybuck in The Lord of the Rings trilogy appears as a Hobbit during the auction scene; and the sons of key second assistant director Guy Campbell, casting director Miranda Rivers, and Weta Workshop founder Richard Taylor appear as Hobbit children during the auction scene.

Production

The Hobbit was originally envisioned as a two-part film, but Jackson confirmed plans for a third film on 30 July 2012, turning his adaptation of The Hobbit into a trilogy.[8][9]According to Jackson, the third film would contain the Battle of the Five Armies and make extensive use of the appendices that Tolkien wrote to expand the story of Middle-earth (published in the back of The Return of the King). Jackson also stated that while the third film will largely make use of footage originally shot for the first and second films, it would require additional filming as well.[10] The third film was titled There and Back Again in August 2012.[11] In April 2014, Jackson changed the title of the film to The Battle of the Five Armies as he thought the new title better suited the situation of the film.[12] He stated on his Facebook page, “There and Back Again felt like the right name for the second of a two film telling of the quest to reclaim Erebor, when Bilbo’s arrival there, and departure, were both contained within the second film. But with three movies, it suddenly felt misplaced—after all, Bilbo has already arrived ‘there’ in the Desolation of Smaug.”[13] Shaun Gunner, the chairman of The Tolkien Society, supported the decision: “The Battle of the Five Armies much better captures the focus of the film but also more accurately channels the essence of the story.”[14]

 

The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
The Hobbit:
The Desolation of Smaug
The Hobbit - The Desolation of Smaug theatrical poster.jpg

Theatrical release poster
Directed by Peter Jackson
Produced by
Screenplay by
Based on The Hobbit 
by J. R. R. Tolkien
Starring
Music by Howard Shore
Cinematography Andrew Lesnie
Edited by Jabez Olssen
Production
company
Distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures
Release dates
  • 2 December 2013(Los Angeles premiere)
  • 12 December 2013(New Zealand)
  • 13 December 2013(United States)
Running time
161 minutes[1]
Country
  • New Zealand[2]
  • United States[2]
Language English
Budget $225 million[3][4]
Box office $958.4 million[5]

The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug is a 2013 high fantasy adventure film directed by Peter Jackson. It was produced byWingNut Films in collaboration with New Line Cinema and Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. It was distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures and is the second installment in the three-part film series based on the novel The Hobbit by J. R. R. Tolkien. The film was preceded by An Unexpected Journey (2012) and followed by The Battle of the Five Armies (2014), and together they act as a prequel to Jackson’sThe Lord of the Rings film trilogy.

The film follows the titular character Bilbo Baggins as he accompanies Thorin Oakenshield and his fellow Dwarves on a quest to reclaim the Lonely Mountain from the dragon Smaug. The film also features the vengeful pursuit of Azog the Defiler and Bolg whileGandalf the Grey investigates a growing evil at the ruins of Dol Guldur. The ensemble cast includes Ian McKellen, Martin Freeman,Richard Armitage, Benedict Cumberbatch, Evangeline Lilly, Lee Pace, Luke Evans, Ken Stott, James Nesbitt, and Orlando Bloom.

The screenplay was written by Fran Walsh, Philippa Boyens, Peter Jackson and Guillermo del Toro. The films were shotsimultaneously in 3D at a projection rate of 48 frames per second, with principal photography taking place around New Zealand and at Pinewood Studios. Additional filming took place throughout May 2013.[6]

The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug premiered on 2 December 2013 in Los Angeles and was released internationally on 11 December 2013 in both conventional and IMAX theatres. The film has grossed over $958 million at the worldwide box office, surpassing both The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towers nominally, making it the fourth highest-grossing film of 2013 and the 27th highest-grossing film of all time.

Plot

Thorin and his company are being pursued by Azog and his Orc party following the events of the previous film. They are ushered along by Gandalf to the nearby home of Beorn, a skin-changer who can take the form of the bear. That night, Azog is summoned toDol Guldur by the Necromancer, who commands him to marshal his forces for war. Azog then delegates the hunt for Thorin to his son Bolg. The following day, Beorn escorts the company to the borders of Mirkwood, where Gandalf discovers Black Speechimprinted on an old ruin. This coincides with a telepathic message from Galadriel urging him to investigate the tombs of the Nazgûl. He warns the company to remain on the path and leaves them. Upon entering the forest they lose their way and are ensnared bygiant spiders. Bilbo then sets about freeing the dwarves with the help of his recently acquired invisibility ring. He subsequently drops the Ring and first begins to understand its dark influence after he brutally kills a centipede-like creature to retrieve it.

The remaining spiders are fended off by the Wood-elves led by Tauriel and Legolas. They also capture the Dwarves, and bring Thorin before their king Thranduil. Thorin confronts the Elvenking about his neglect of the Dwarves of Erebor following Smaug‘s attack 60 years earlier, and is consequently imprisoned with the other Dwarves. Bilbo, having avoided capture, arranges an escape using empty wine barrels that are sent downstream. While being pursued by the Wood-elves, they are ambushed by Bolg and his Orc party, and Kíli is wounded with a Morgul shaft. They engage in a running three-way battle down the river, but ultimately the Dwarves are able to escape both groups of pursuers. Thranduil then seals off his kingdom when an Orc captive reveals an evil entity has returned and is amassing an army in the south, but Tauriel decides to leave and assist the Dwarves. Legolas goes after her. Meanwhile, Gandalf and Radagast go to investigate the tombs of the Nazgûl, which they find to be empty.

The company are smuggled into Esgaroth by a bargeman called Bard. Thorin promises the Master and the people of Laketown a share of the mountain’s treasure. It is then revealed that Bard is a descendant of the last ruler of Dale, and possesses the last black arrow capable of killing Smaug. Kíli is forced to remain behind, tended to by Fíli, Óin, and Bofur, as the remaining company receive a grand farewell. Meanwhile, Gandalf travels south to the ruins of Dol Guldur, while Radagast leaves to warn Galadriel of their discovery at the tombs of the Nazgul. Gandalf finds the ruins infested with Orcs and is ambushed by Azog. The Necromancer overpowers and defeats Gandalf and reveals himself as Sauron.

Thorin and his remaining company reach the Lonely Mountain, where Bilbo discovers the hidden entrance. He is sent in to retrieve the Arkenstone, and while doing so, he accidentally awakens Smaug. While trying to find Bilbo, Smaug reveals his knowledge of Sauron’s return. Back in Laketown, Bard attempts to bring the black arrow to the town’s launcher, as he fears what may happen when the Dwarves enter the mountain. However, he is arrested in the process and leaves his son to hide the arrow. Bolg and his Orc party then infiltrate the town and attack the four Dwarves, but are quickly dispatched following the arrival of Tauriel and Legolas. Tauriel then tends to Kíli. While Kíli is recovering, he openly admires Tauriel’s beauty and wonders if she loves him. Legolas leaves in pursuit of Bolg. Meanwhile, Gandalf watches helplessly as Azog and an Orc army march from Dol Guldur towards the Lonely Mountain.

Back inside the mountain, Bilbo and the Dwarves try to rekindle the mountain’s forge in an attempt to bury Smaug alive in molten gold. This fails however and Smaug stumbles out of the mountain and flies off to destroy Laketown as Bilbo watches in horror at what they have unleashed, saying to himself, “What have we done?”

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 1

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 1
A girl and two boys, running through a dark forest.

British release poster
Directed by David Yates
Produced by
Screenplay by Steve Kloves
Based on Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows
by J. K. Rowling
Starring
Music by Alexandre Desplat
Cinematography Eduardo Serra
Edited by Mark Day
Production
company
Distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures
Release dates
  • 11 November 2010(London premiere)
  • 19 November 2010(United Kingdom)
  • 19 November 2010(North America)
Running time
146 minutes[1]
Country United Kingdom
United States
Language English
Budget $250 million
(Shared with Part 2)[2][3]
Box office $960.3 million[4]

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 1 is a 2010 fantasy film directed by David Yates and distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures.[4] It is the first of two cinematic parts based on the novel by J. K. Rowling.[5] The film, which is the seventh instalment in theHarry Potter film series, was written by Steve Kloves and produced by David Heyman, David Barron, and Rowling.

The film stars Daniel Radcliffe as Harry Potter, alongside Rupert Grint and Emma Watson as Harry’s best friends Ron Weasley andHermione Granger. It is the sequel to Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince and is followed by the concluding entry, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 2.

The story follows Harry Potter on a quest to find and destroy Lord Voldemort‘s secret to immortality – the Horcruxes. Principal photography began on 19 February 2009 and was completed on 12 June 2010.[6] Part 1 was released in 2D cinemas and IMAXformats worldwide on 19 November 2010.[7][8][9][10]

In the film’s worldwide opening weekend, Part 1 grossed $330 million, the third highest in the series, and the highest opening of 2010, as well as the eighth-highest of all-time.[11] With a worldwide gross of $960 million, Part 1 is the third-highest grossing film of 2010, behind Toy Story 3 and Alice in Wonderland,[12] and the third highest grossing Harry Potter film in terms of worldwide totals behind Deathly Hallows – Part 2 and Philosopher’s Stone,[13] and the 28th highest-grossing film of all-time.[14] The film received two nominations at the 83rd Academy Awards: Best Visual Effects and Best Art Direction.

Plot

See also: Plot of Part 2

The Minister of Magic, Rufus Scrimgeour, addresses the wizarding media, stating that the Ministry would remain strong even as Lord Voldemort gains strength. Harry, Ron and Hermione prepare for a journey to find and destroy Voldemort’s Horcruxes, with Harry watching Dursleys depart and Hermione wiping her parent’s memories of her.

Severus Snape arrives at Malfoy Manor to inform Lord Voldemort and his Death Eaters of Harry’s impending departure from No. 4 Privet Drive. Voldemort commandeers Lucius Malfoy‘s wand, as Voldemort’s own wand cannot be used to kill Harry, because the wands are “twins”.

Meanwhile, the Order of the Phoenix gather at Privet Drive and escort Harry to safety, using Polyjuice Potion to create six decoy Harrys out of everyone else. During their flight to the Weasley family home at the Burrow, all are ambushed by Death Eaters, who kill Mad-Eye Moody and Harry’s owl, Hedwig, injure George Weasley, and knock out Hagridwhich forces Harry to take over and drive his flying motorcycle while fighting Voldemort, destroying some power lines that causes a blackout to the city. At the Burrow, Harry has a vision of the wand-maker Ollivander being tormented by Voldemort, who claims that Ollivander had lied to him by claiming that the only way Voldemort could kill Harry was by using another person’s wand.

Scrimgeour arrives at the Burrow with Albus Dumbledore’s Will and distributes three items to Ron, Hermione, and Harry. Ron receives Dumbledore’s Deluminator, Hermione a copy of The Tales of Beedle the Bard, and Harry the first Golden Snitch that he ever caught in a Quidditch match. Scrimgeour reveals that Harry was also bequeathed the Sword of Godric Gryffindor, but the Minister states that the sword was not Dumbledore’s to pass on and, in any case, is missing.

Next, the Death Eaters assassinate Scrimgeour and replace him with their puppet Pius Thicknesse, who, under the influence of the Imperius curse, begins persecuting Muggle-born witches and wizards. When Death Eaters disrupt the wedding of Bill Weasley and Fleur Delacour, Harry, Hermione, and Ron disapparate to London and find sanctuary atNo. 12 Grimmauld Place. There they discover that the “R.A.B.” from the false Horcrux locket is Regulus Arcturus Black, the younger brother of Sirius Black. From Kreacher, the Blacks’ house-elf, they learn that Mundungus Fletcher stole the real locket. Kreacher and Dobby apprehend Fletcher, who reveals that the locket is in the possession of Dolores Umbridge. Under the disguise of Polyjuice Potion, the trio infiltrate the Ministry. In the courtroom, Umbridge is interrogating a Muggle-born witch, enraging Harry who says to her “You’re lying, Dolores. And one mustn’t tell lies.” He then stuns her and Hermione successfully retrieves the locket. The trio escape into the wilderness after accidentally revealing the location of 12 Grimmauld Place to Yaxley, a Death Eater.

Unable to destroy the Horcrux, they take turns wearing it to dilute its malignant power. Harry sees a vision of Voldemort interrogating Gregorovitch, a renowned wand-maker, who claims that a teenage boy had once stolen the legendary Elder Wand from his shop. While Ron wears the locket, he is overcome by his negative feelings and after arguing with Harry, he leaves, upsetting Hermione. Harry and Hermione decide to go to Godric’s Hollow, where they visit Harry’s parents’ graves and the house where they were killed. Next they visit Bathilda Bagshot, who they believe has the Sword of Gryffindor, which they deduce can destroy Horcruxes. They are surprised by Voldemort’s snake, Nagini, who had been possessing her corpse. Hermione accidentally breaks Harry’s wand as they escape into the Forest of Dean, where Hermione identifies the mysterious thief seen in Harry’s vision as Gellert Grindelwald.

When evening falls, Harry sees a Patronus in the form of a doe which leads him to a frozen pond. Gryffindor’s sword lies beneath the pond’s ice. Harry breaks the ice and jumps in to reach the sword. The locket around his neck attempts to strangle him, but Ron arrives to rescue Harry. Ron destroys the locket with the Sword of Gryffindor. Hermione is angry with Ron at first but then reconciles with him.

The trio then visit Xenophilius Lovegood to learn about a symbol seen several times on their journey. He tells them that the symbol represents the Deathly Hallows: the Elder Wand, the Resurrection Stone and the Cloak of Invisibility. Lovegood betrays them to the Death Eaters in an effort to have his kidnapped daughter returned. Harry has a vision of Voldemort learning from Grindelwald that the Elder Wand lies with Dumbledore in his grave.

The trio escape into the wilderness once more, but Snatchers appear and chase them. They are captured and taken to Malfoy Manor. Bellatrix Lestrange imprisons Harry and Ron in a cellar in which they discover Luna, Ollivander, and Griphook the goblin. Bellatrix tortures Hermione for information on how they got the sword of Gryffindor. After Dobby apparates in the cellar to save them, and incapacitates Peter Pettigrew, a short battle ensues; Harry duels and disarms Draco Malfoy. Narcissa Malfoy‘s wand is taken by Dobby who says “Dobby has no master. Dobby is a free elf. And Dobby has come to save Harry Potter and his friends.” Dobby is killed by Bellatrix right after he helps Harry and the other captives escape. Meanwhile, Voldemort breaks into Dumbledore’s tomb and takes the Elder Wand.

Pirates of the Caribbean: At World’s End

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
Pirates of the Caribbean:
At World’s End
Pirates AWE Poster.jpg

Theatrical release poster
Directed by Gore Verbinski
Produced by Jerry Bruckheimer
Written by
Based on
Starring
Music by Hans Zimmer
Cinematography Dariusz Wolski
Edited by
Production
company
Distributed by Buena Vista Pictures
Release dates
  • May 19, 2007(Anaheim premiere)
  • May 25, 2007
Running time
169 minutes[1]
Country United States
Language English
Budget $300 million
Box office $963.4 million[2]

Pirates of the Caribbean: At World’s End is a 2007 American epic fantasy swashbuckler film and the third installment of thePirates of the Caribbean film series. The plot follows Will Turner (Orlando Bloom), Elizabeth Swann (Keira Knightley), Hector Barbossa (Geoffrey Rush), and the crew of the Black Pearl rescuing Captain Jack Sparrow (Johnny Depp) from Davy Jones’ Locker, and then preparing to fight the East India Trading Company, led by Cutler Beckett (Tom Hollander) and Davy Jones (Bill Nighy), who plan to extinguish piracy forever. It is the last film in the series to be directed by Gore Verbinski. It was shot in two shoots during 2005 and 2006, the former simultaneously with the preceding film, Dead Man’s Chest.

The film was released in English-speaking countries on May 25, 2007, after Walt Disney Pictures decided to move the release date a day earlier than originally planned. Critical reviews were mixed. The film was praised for its performances, musical score, action scenes, and special effects, but was criticized for its plot and running time. At World’s End was a box office hit, becoming the most successful film of 2007, with over $960 million worldwide.

It was nominated for the Academy Award for Makeup and the Academy Award for Visual Effects, which it lost to La Vie en Rose andThe Golden Compass, respectively. A fourth installment, On Stranger Tides, the first to neither be directed by Verbinski nor star Bloom and Knightley, was released in cinemas on May 20, 2011.

With a production budget of $300 million, Pirates of the Caribbean: At World’s End was the most expensive film ever made at the time of its release, even after adjusting for inflation.

Plot

To control the oceans, Lord Cutler Beckett executes anyone associated with piracy and uses Davy Jones to destroy pirate ships. Condemned prisoners sing “Hoist the Colours” to compel the nine Pirate Lords to convene at Shipwreck Cove to hold the Brethren Court. However, Captain Jack Sparrow, one of the Lords, never named a successor. Captain Barbossa, along with Will Turner,Elizabeth Swann, Tia Dalma, and the crew of the Black Pearl, plot to rescue Jack from Davy Jones’ Locker. Travelling to Singapore, the crew meet Sao Feng who owns navigational charts to the Locker. Beckett’s soldiers invade, but the crew escape, Feng and Turner making a deal to give Jack to Feng so he in turn can use the Pearl to rescue his father Bootstrap Bill from the Flying Dutchman. The crew successfully rescue Jack, but find themselves trapped in the Locker, encountering dead souls, including Elizabeth’s murdered father Governor Swann. They learn the Dutchman must have a captain, and their heart must be cut out to captain the vessel.

Returning to the living world, the Pearl crew are set upon by Sao Feng and Beckett’s men. Through a complex series of deals, Elizabeth is handed over to Feng under the belief she is the goddess Calypso, while the rest of the crew make for Shipwreck Cove aboard the Pearl, though Jack later kicks Will off the ship as part of the plan to seize control of the Dutchman and save Will’s father. Sao Feng explains to Elizabeth that the Brethren Court bound Calypso in human form after she betrayed her lover Davy Jones, and plans to release her to defeat Beckett. Davy Jones attacks Feng’s ship, killing him, but he appoints Elizabeth his successor as Pirate Lord before dying. Admiral Norrington frees Elizabeth and her new crew from the Dutchman upon learning what happened to Elizabeth’s father, but is run through by a crazed Bootstrap Bill.

The Black Pearl arrives at Shipwreck Cove where Barbossa tries to convince the Court to release Calypso. Jack’s father Captain Teague and Keeper of the Pirate Code, informs the Court that only an elected Pirate King can decide what shall be done, so Jack votes for Elizabeth to ascend to the title. Davy Jones visits Tia Dalma in the Pearl’s brig, revealing she is Calypso, and they promise to be together again. When Beckett’s fleet arrive to confront the Brethren Court’s, Elizabeth, Jack, Barbossa, Beckett, Jones, and Willparley, trading Will for Jack, and Barbossa steals Jack’s piece of eight, all of which are owned by the Pirate Lords and required to free Calypso. Barbossa frees Calypso, but when Will reveals it was Jones who imprisoned her, Calypso vanishes and summons an enormous maelstrom.

The Pearl and the Dutchman battle in the maelstrom, with both Will and Elizabeth being wed by Barbossa before swinging over to the Dutchman to aid Jack. Jones stabs Will with a sword, but Jack and Elizabeth have Will stab Jones’ heart, killing Jones. Will dies, Jack and Elizabeth escaping the Dutchman as it is sucked into a maelstrom. As Beckett’s ship, the Endeavour, approaches to destroy the Pearl, the Dutchman rises, now captained by Will, and the crew free of Jones’ curse. Together, the two pirate ships destroy theEndeavour, with a stunned Beckett going down with the ship while his army retreats. With Will now bound to escort souls lost at sea to the next world for ten years, Will and Elizabeth consummate their marriage before he departs on the Dutchman.

Later, Jack and Joshamee Gibbs discover Barbossa has stolen the Black Pearl again, but Jack planned ahead and cut out Sao Feng’s navigational charts, departing fromTortuga alone to track down the mythical Fountain of Youth to become immortal. Ten years later, Elizabeth and her son watch from a sea cliff as Will returns aboard the Dutchman.

Cast

  • Johnny Depp as Captain Jack Sparrow: Sparrow and the Black Pearl have been dragged to Davy Jones’ Locker by the Kraken and is trapped there until his former crew mounts a rescue party.
  • Orlando Bloom as William “Will” Turner Jr.: A young blacksmith-turned-pirate, the son of “Bootstrap Bill” Turner, and the later husband of Elizabeth Swann.
  • Keira Knightley as Captain Elizabeth Swann: Governor Swann’s daughter and Will Turner’s fiancée. Having tricked Jack Sparrow into being swallowed by the Kraken to save herself and the Black Pearl crew, she subsequently goes to his rescue.
  • Stellan Skarsgård as William “Bootstrap Bill” Turner, Sr.: Will’s father, cursed to serve an eternity aboard Davy Jones’ ship The Flying Dutchman. As he slowly loses hope, he also loses his humanity to the ship, and becomes mentally confused, barely recognizing his own son in the second half of the film.
  • Bill Nighy as Davy Jones: Malevolent ruler of the ocean realm, captain of The Flying Dutchman. With his heart captured by James Norrington, he is now enslaved to Cutler Beckett who commanded him to kill the Kraken (“your pet”), and now serves the East India Trading Company, though he remains volatile and makes life difficult for the marines policing him.
  • Chow Yun-fat as Sao Feng: Pirate Lord of the South China Sea, he captains the Chinese ship The Empress and has a poor history with Sparrow. He is reluctant to aid in his rescue from Davy Jones’ Locker. “Sao Feng” (嘯風) means “Howling Wind” in Chinese. Chow was confirmed to be playing Feng in July 2005 while production of the second film was on hiatus.[3] Chow relished playing the role, even helping out crew members with props.[4]
  • Geoffrey Rush as Captain Hector Barbossa: Once first mate of the Black Pearlunder Jack’s command before leading a mutiny, Barbossa has been resurrected by Tia Dalma to captain the rescue of Jack Sparrow. He was also needed for his “piece of eight” to free Calypso. Rush said that in the film, Barbossa becomes more of a cunning politician.[5] Depp said he was pleased he got more screentime with Rush than in the first film: “We’re like a couple of old ladies fighting over their knitting needles”.[6]
  • Tom Hollander as Cutler Beckett: A powerful chairman of the East India Trading Co.and now armed with a mandate from the King and in possession of Davy Jones’ heart, Beckett attempts to control the world’s oceans for the sake of sustainable business – and with it, the end of piracy.

Despicable Me 2

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Despicable Me 2
A bald man is standing and looking at yellow creatures.

Theatrical release poster
Directed by Pierre Coffin
Chris Renaud
Produced by Chris Meledandri
Janet Healy
Written by Cinco Paul
Ken Daurio
Starring Steve Carell
Kristen Wiig
Benjamin Bratt
Miranda Cosgrove
Elsie Fisher
Dana Gaier
Russell Brand
Steve Coogan
Ken Jeong
Music by Heitor Pereira
Pharrell Williams
Edited by Gregory Perler
Production
company
Distributed by Universal Pictures
Release dates
  • June 5, 2013 (Australia)
  • July 3, 2013 (United States)
Running time
98 minutes[1]
Country United States
Language English
Budget $76 million[2]
Box office $970.8 million[3]

Despicable Me 2 is a 2013 American 3D computer-animated comedy film and the sequel to the 2010 animated film Despicable Me. Produced by Illumination Entertainment for Universal Pictures, and animated by Illumination Mac Guff, the film is directed by Pierre Coffin and Chris Renaud, and written by Cinco Paul and Ken Daurio.

Steve Carell, Russell Brand and Miranda Cosgrove reprise their roles as Gru, Dr. Nefario and Margo, respectively. Kristen Wiig, who played Miss Hattie in the first film, voices agent Lucy Wilde, while Ken Jeong, who played the Talk Show Host, voices Floyd Eagle-san. New cast members include Benjamin Bratt as Eduardo “El Macho” Pérez and Steve Coogan as Silas Ramsbottom, head of the Anti-Villain League (AVL).

The film premiered on June 5, 2013 in Australia, and was theatrically released in the United States on July 3, 2013. The film received mostly positive reviews from critics, and was nominated for Academy Award for Best Animated Feature and for Academy Award for Best Original Song (for “Happy“), losing both to Walt Disney Animation StudiosFrozen. Grossing over $970 million worldwide against its budget of $76 million, the film became the second-highest-grossing animated film of 2013 and the third-highest-grossing film of 2013. It is also the most profitable film in the 101-year history of Universal Studios.

A prequel/spin-off film, Minions, focusing on the little yellow henchmen before they met Gru, was released on July 10, 2015. A third film, Despicable Me 3, is scheduled for release on June 30, 2017.

Plot

A mysterious vehicle using a huge magnet steals a highly potent mutagen known as PX-41 from a secret laboratory in the Arctic Circle. The Anti-Villain League (AVL) tries to recruit former supervillain, Gru, to find who stole the mutagen, but Gru refuses, claiming he is a legitimate businessman now as well as the father of Margo, Edith, and Agnes. Dr. Nefario, Gru’s friend and assistant, has decided to leave him for new employment, claiming he “missed being evil.” Gru reluctantly partners with undercover AVL agent Lucy Wilde, and they search a local mall, the Paradise Shopping Mall, disguised as bakery employees. Mexican restaurant owner, Eduardo Pérez, is suspected by Gru of being “El Macho”, a legendary supervillain who supposedly died afterskysurfing a shark into the center of an active volcano. Gru and Lucy break into Eduardo’s restaurant at night, but find nothing to prove that he is the culprit. Meanwhile, Agnes expresses her wish to have a mother someday and believes that Gru will fall in love with Lucy, but despite her excitement, Gru tells her that his relationship with Lucy is strictly professional.

Gru and Lucy investigate wig merchant Floyd Eagle-san, but Gru is still suspicious of Eduardo after seeing Eduardo’s two-timing son, Antonio, going out with Margo, and inviting everyone to his Cinco de Mayo party. Afterwards, Gru is set up on a horrible dinner date with a rude woman named Shannon, who notices Gru’s wig and threatens to humiliate him, but Lucy rescues him by shooting Shannon with a tranquilizer dart. They take Shannon home, and afterwards, Gru realizes that Agnes was right, as he has fallen in love with Lucy.

The next day, the AVL arrests Floyd Eagle-san due to an almost-empty mutagen jar being found in his shop, and the investigation is closed. Lucy is reassigned to Australia, but before leaving, gives Gru her lipstick Taser to remind him of her. This leaves Gru heartbroken because he loves her, but he cannot find the courage to ask her out on a date. Instead, he brings the girls to the Cinco de Mayo party and finds proof that Eduardo is El Macho. Gru discovers that he and his partner, Nefario, have captured and mutated a large number of Gru’s Minions using the PX-41, turning them into insane, savage purple-furred monsters, with El Macho planning to send rockets full of mutated Minions to major cities and achieve world domination. El Macho proposes that he and Gru team up, but Gru avoids answering and leaves.

On her flight to Australia, Lucy realizes she has also fallen in love with Gru and jumps out of the plane, but after hang gliding down to the party, she is captured by El Macho after Pollito, his pet chicken, retrieves her AVL ID badge from her purse. Fortunately, Nefario informs Gru, and to rescue Lucy, Gru visits El Macho along with two Minions covered in purple paint, pretending he was captured by them. Fighting alongside his daughters and Nefario, Gru and his team spray all of the mutated Minions with jelly containing a powerful antidote that Dr. Nefario made, whereupon they revert to their friendly yellow state. El Macho then takes the mutagen himself, but Gru and Dr. Nefario overcome him using Lucy’s lipstick Taser and a fart gun.

Gru sees Lucy strapped to a TNT-loaded shark rocket and starts to untie her, but Pollito launches the rocket, sending the rocket flying towards the same volcano where El Macho previously faked his death. Lucy accepts Gru’s invitation for a date, and the pair dive into the ocean seconds before the rocket enters the volcano.

After 147 dates, Gru and Lucy are married and Margo, Edith, and Agnes finally have a mother. The Minions close with a rendition of “I Swear” and “Y.M.C.A” as the whole family celebrates.

Cast

Miranda Cosgrove and Steve Carell at the Australian premiere ofDespicable Me 2

  • Steve Carell as Gru,[4] a former villain turned father.
  • Kristen Wiig as Lucy Wilde, an Anti-Villain League agent and Gru’s love interest/new partner.[5][6] Wiig also voiced Miss Hattie in the first film.
  • Benjamin Bratt as Eduardo “El Macho” Pérez, the owner of Salsa & Salsa, a Mexican restaurant in the Paradise Mall, and the mastermind behind the theft of the PX-41 serium.[7][8][9] Al Pacino was originally cast in the role, but left the film due to creative differences.[10]
  • Miranda Cosgrove as Margo, the oldest of the three girls and the most overprotective of the trio.[4]
  • Elsie Fisher as Agnes, the youngest child of the three girls, who is obsessed with unicorns[11]
  • Dana Gaier as Edith, the middle and tomboy of the three girls[12]
  • Russell Brand as Dr. Nefario, Gru’s elderly, hearing impaired gadget man[4]
  • Ken Jeong as Floyd Eagle-san, the owner of Eagle Hair Club, a wig store in the Paradise Mall.[7][13] Jeong also voiced Talk Show Host in the previous film.
  • Steve Coogan as Silas Ramsbottom, the head of the Anti-Villain League[4][14]
  • Moisés Arias as Antonio Pérez, Margo’s love interest and Eduardo’s son[15][16]
  • Nasim Pedrad as Jillian, Gru’s irritating matchmaking neighbor[17][18]
  • Kristen Schaal as Shannon, Jillian’s superficial friend[18]
  • Pierre Coffin as Kevin the Minion, Bob the Minion, Stuart the Minion, Additional Minions, and Evil Minions.[18] According to Coffin, he lent his voice to 899 Minions.[19]
  • Chris Renaud as Additional Minions, Evil Minions, and Italian waiter[18]
  • Vanessa Bayer as Flight Attendant[18]

Production

Pierre Coffi
Chris Renaud
Directors Pierre Coffin and Chris Renaud at the film’s screening at the 2013 Annecy International Animated Film Festival

Chris Meledandri, CEO of Illumination Entertainment, said in July 2010 that a sequel was in the works.[20] Release was tentatively scheduled for July 3, 2013.[21] Miranda Cosgrove stated on her official Facebook and Twitter page on October 14, 2011 that she had recorded her first lines,[22] while Meledandri confirmed in February 2012 that they had started working on the film.[23]

Casting

In February 2012, it was reported that Al Pacino had joined the cast to voice the villain, Eduardo.[24] In April 2012, producers confirmed that Steve Carell, Russell Brand, Miranda Cosgrove, Dana Gaier and Elsie Fisher were returning to reprise their roles. Kristen Wiig, who voiced Miss Hattie in the original film, voices Lucy Wilde, an agent of the Anti-Villain League (AVL) who recruits Gru to track and take down a tough, Mexican villain named El Macho. Steve Coogan joined the cast as Silas Ramsbottom, the head of the Anti-Villain League.[4]

On May 3, 2013, just a month before the film’s premiere, producers announced that Al Pacino had left the film over creative differences about how his character should come to life.[10][25] At the time of his departure, Pacino’s character had been already fully voiced and animated.[26] Chris Renaud, co-director of the film, commented on Pacino’s departure: “So we don’t want an unhappy actor, and we want something that is well-realized on all sides. If you don’t see eye to eye, sometimes it’s easier to (part company) and move on from there.”[25] Benjamin Bratt, who had already been considered before Pacino,[25] stepped in to voice Eduardo.[8] Chris Meledandri, producer of the film, admitted that he was not “aware of any of the major animated films of the last 15 years that has brought an actor in at such a late stage”.[26] Due to the finished animation, Bratt had to match his timing exactly to the character’s mouth movement.[27] Initially, during his five-day recording,[26] he tried to imitate Pacino’s voice, but found it impossible, saying “no one can out-Al Pacino Al Pacino”. He ended up only using Pacino as an inspiration, and resolved to go with his own interpretation of the character.[28] His work was commended by Variety, saying: “You’d never guess he wasn’t the filmmakers’ first choice.”[16]

Release

Minion Hot air balloon during theAnnecy International Animated Film Festival 2013

Despicable Me 2 premiered on June 5, 2013, at Event Cinemas in Bondi Junction, New South Wales, Australia. Steve Carell and Miranda Cosgrove were present at the red carpet premiere.[29][30] In France, it premiered on June 12, 2013, as part of the Annecy International Animated Film Festival.[31] The American premiere was held at Universal CityWalk in Los Angeles on June 22, 2013;[17] Steve Carell, Miranda Cosgrove, Kristen Wiig, Benjamin Bratt, Ken Jeong, Elsie Fisher, Dana Gaier, Nasim Pedrad and composer Pharrell Williamswere present at the “yellow carpet” premiere.[32][33] The film was theatrically released in the United States on July 3, 2013.[4] It was digitally re-mastered into IMAX 3D format and released in select international IMAX theatres.[34] This film was also shown in the 4DX format, featuring tilting seats, water sprays, strobe lightning, aroma, wind, pops, and ticklers, in selected countries.[35][36][37][38] Cinépolis opened its first 4DX room at the Centro Comercial Limonar Premier mall in Cali, Colombia, with the release of the film.[39][40][41]

As with the first film, which did not have a theatrical release in China, the film’s distributor Universal Pictures had troubles releasing the sequel.[42] When it was reported in July 2013 that the film had been denied a theatrical release in China, then the second largest film market in the world, some analysts attributed this to the protection of locally produced animation.[43][44] There were also rumors that the film’s release was banned in China because the film’s minions too much resembled former Chinese president Jiang Zemin.[45] China’s Film Bureau was “furious” about the negative comments, stating that the film was not submitted for censorship approval.[46] In fact, there was reportedly a “commercial conflict” between Universal and Edko Films, the film’s local distributor, over which titles are to be imported.[47] Edko had decided that the film “would not do well in China and decided against using one of the precious quota slots for the film.”[46] In December 2013, a few weeks after the Universal Pictures’ announcement that it would open a Beijing office, it was reported that Despicable Me 2 would be theatrically released in China on January 10, 2014.[45]

 

Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone (film)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone
Two posters, one with photographs and the other hand-drawn, both depicting a young boy with glasses, an old man with glasses, a young girl holding books, a redheaded boy, and a large bearded man in front of a castle, with an owl flying. The left poster also features an adult man, an old woman, and a train, with the titles being "Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone". The right poster has a long-nosed goblin and blowtorches, with the title "Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone".

International poster displaying the Philosopher’s Stone title (left) and the American poster, designed by Drew Struzan, displaying theSorcerer’s Stone title (right).
Directed by Chris Columbus
Produced by David Heyman
Screenplay by Steve Kloves
Based on Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone 
by J. K. Rowling
Starring Daniel Radcliffe
Rupert Grint
Emma Watson
Music by John Williams
Cinematography John Seale
Edited by Richard Francis-Bruce
Production
company
Distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures
Release dates
  • 4 November 2001(London premiere)
  • 16 November 2001(United Kingdom & United States)
Running time
152 minutes[1]
158 minutes (Extended Edition)[2]
Country United Kingdom
United States
Language English
Budget $125 million[3]
Box office $974.8 million[4]

Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone (released in some territories with the alternative subtitle the Sorcerer’s Stone)[5] is a 2001 fantasy film directed by Chris Columbus and distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures.[4] It is based on the novel of the same name by J. K. Rowling. The film, which is the first instalment in the Harry Potter film series, was written by Steve Kloves and produced by David Heyman. The story follows Harry Potter‘s first year at Hogwarts as he discovers that he is a famous wizard and begins his magical education.

The film stars Daniel Radcliffe as Harry Potter, with Rupert Grint as Ron Weasley, and Emma Watson as Hermione Granger. It is followed by seven sequels in total, beginning with Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets.

Warner Bros. bought the film rights to the book in 1999 for a reported £1 million. Production began in the United Kingdom in 2000, with Columbus being chosen to create the film from a short list of directors that included Steven Spielberg and Rob Reiner. J. K. Rowling insisted that the entire cast be British or Irish. The film was shot at Leavesden Film Studios and historic buildings around the UK.

The film was released in the UK and US on 16 November 2001. It received positive critical reception, made more than $970 million at the worldwide box office, and was nominated for many awards, including the Academy Awards for Best Original Score, Best Art Direction and Best Costume Design. As of June 2015, it is the 23rd-highest-grossing film of all time and the second-highest-grossing film in the series behind the final film, Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows – Part 2.

Plot

Further information: Plot of the novel

Harry Potter is a seemingly ordinary boy, living with his hostile relatives, the Dursleys in Surrey. On his eleventh birthday, Harry learns from a mysterious stranger, Rubeus Hagrid, that he is actually a wizard, famous in the Wizarding World for surviving an attack by the evil Lord Voldemort when Harry was only a baby. Voldemort killed Harry’s parents, but his attack on Harry rebounded, leaving only a lightning-bolt scar on Harry’s forehead and rendering Voldemort powerless. Hagrid reveals to Harry that he has been invited to attend Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry. After buying his school supplies from the hidden London street, Diagon Alley, Harry boards the train to Hogwarts via the concealed Platform 9¾ in King’s Cross Station.

On the train, Harry meets Ron Weasley, a boy from a large, but poor, pure-blood wizarding family, and Hermione Granger, a witch born to non-magical parents. Once they arrive at the school, Harry and all of the other first-year students are sorted into four different houses: Gryffindor, Hufflepuff, Ravenclaw, and Slytherin. As Slytherin is noted for being the house of darker wizards and witches, Harry successfully begs the magical Sorting Hat not to put him in Slytherin. He winds up in Gryffindor, along with Ron and Hermione. Ron’s older brothers have all gone to Gryffindor too: mischievous twins Fred and George, Percy, the prefect, Charlie (who researches dragons in Romania) and Bill (who works for Gringotts Bank).

At Hogwarts, Harry begins learning wizardry and also discovers more about his past and his parents. He gets recruited for Gryffindor’s Quidditch (a sport in the wizarding world where people fly on broomsticks) team as a Seeker, as his father was before him. One night, he, Ron and Hermione find a giant three-headed dog on a restricted floor at the school. The dog is guarding the Philosopher’s Stone, an item that can be used to grant its owner immortality. Harry concludes that his potions teacher, the unfriendly Severus Snape, is trying to obtain the stone in order to return Voldemort, who Harry encounters in the Forbidden Forest where he, Ron, Hermione and Draco Malfoy are serving detention by helping Hagrid look for an injured unicorn after being caught wandering around at night, to a human form.

After hearing from Hagrid that the dog will fall asleep if played music, Harry, Ron and Hermione decide to find the stone before Snape does. They face a series of tasks that are helping protect the stone, which include surviving a deadly plant, flying past hundreds of flying keys and winning a violent, life-sized chess game.

 

Voldemort attached to the back of Professor Quirrell’s skull

After getting past the tasks, Harry finds out that it was not Snape who wanted the stone, but rather Defence Against the Dark Arts teacherProfessor Quirrell. Quirrell removes his turban and reveals Voldemort to be living on the back of his head. Voldemort tries to convince Harry to give him the stone (which Harry suddenly finds in his pocket as the result of an enchantment by the headmaster, Albus Dumbledore), by promising to bring his parents back from the dead, but Harry refuses. Quirrell tries to kill him but Harry’s touch prevents Quirrell from hurting Harry and causes his hand to turn to dust. Quirrell then tries to take the stone but Harry grabs his face, causing Quirrell to turn into dust and die. When Harry gets up, Voldemort’s spirit forms and passes through Harry, knocking him unconscious, before fleeing.

Harry wakes up in the school’s hospital wing, with Professor Dumbledore at his side. Dumbledore explains that the stone has been destroyed, and that, despite Ron nearly being killed in the chess match, both Hermione and Ron are fine. The reason Quirrell burned at Harry’s touch was because when Harry’s mother died to save him, her death gave Harry a magical, love-based protection against Voldemort. Harry, Ron and Hermione are rewarded house points for their heroic performances, and Neville Longbottom is rewarded for bravely standing up to them, winning Gryffindor the House Cup. Before Harry and the rest of the students leave for the summer, Harry realizes that while every other student is going home, Hogwarts is truly his home.

Cast

Rowling personally insisted that the cast be kept British.[6] Susie Figgis was appointed as casting director, working with both Columbus and Rowling in auditioning the lead roles of Harry, Ron and Hermione.[7] Open casting calls were held for the main three roles,[8] with only British children being considered.[9] The principal auditions took place in three parts, with those auditioning having to read a page from Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone, then if called back, they had to improvise a scene of the students’ arrival at Hogwarts, they were then given several pages from the script to read in front of Columbus.[9] Scenes from Columbus’ script for the 1985 film Young Sherlock Holmes were also used in auditions.[10] On 11 July 2000, Figgis left the production, complaining that Columbus did not consider any of the thousands of children they had auditioned “worthy”.[10] On 8 August 2000, the virtually unknown Daniel Radcliffe and newcomers Rupert Grint and Emma Watson were selected to play Harry Potter, Ron Weasley and Hermione Granger, respectively.[11]

  • Daniel Radcliffe as Harry Potter. Columbus had wanted Radcliffe for the role since he saw him in the BBC’s production of David Copperfield, before the open casting sessions had taken place, but had been told by Figgis that Radcliffe’s protective parents would not allow their son to take the part.[3] Columbus explained that his persistence in giving Radcliffe the role was responsible for Figgis’ resignation.[3] Radcliffe was asked to audition in 2000, when Heyman and Kloves met him and his parents at a production ofStones in His Pockets in London.[12] Heyman and Columbus successfully managed to convince Radcliffe’s parents that their son would be protected from media intrusion, and they agreed to let him play Harry.[3] Rowling approved of Radcliffe’s casting, stating that “having seen [his] screen test I don’t think Chris Columbus could have found a better Harry.”[13] Radcliffe was reportedly paid £1 million for the film, although he felt the fee was not “that important”.[14] William Moseley, who was later cast as Peter Pevensie inThe Chronicles of Narnia series, also auditioned for the role.[15]
  • Rupert Grint as Ron Weasley, Harry’s best friend at Hogwarts. He decided he would be perfect for the part “because [he has got] ginger hair,” and was a fan of the series.[14]Having seen a Newsround report about the open casting he sent in a video of himself rapping about how he wished to receive the part. His attempt was successful as the casting team asked for a meeting with him.[14]
  • Emma Watson as Hermione Granger, Harry’s other best friend and the trio’s brains. Watson’s Oxford theatre teacher passed her name on to the casting agents and she had to do over five interviews before she got the part.[16] Watson took her audition seriously, but “never really thought [she] had any chance of getting the role.”[14] The producers were impressed by Watson’s self-confidence and she outperformed the thousands of other girls who had applied.[17]

Rik Mayall was cast in the role of Peeves, a poltergeist who likes to prank students in the novel. Mayall had to shout his lines off camera during takes,[24] but the scene ended up being cut from the film.[25]

Production

Development

In 1997, producer David Heyman searched for a children’s book that could be adapted into a well-received film.[3] He had planned to produce Diana Wynne Jones‘ novel The Ogre Downstairs, but his plans fell through. His staff at Heyday Films then suggested Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone, which his assistant believed was “a cool idea.”[3]Heyman pitched the idea to Warner Bros.[3] and the following year, Rowling sold the company the rights to the first four Harry Potter books for a reported £1 million (US$1,982,900).[26] A demand Rowling made was that the principal cast be kept strictly British, nonetheless allowing for the inclusion of Irish actors such as Richard Harris as Dumbledore, and for casting of French and Eastern European actors in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire where characters from the book are specified as such.[6] Rowling was hesitant to sell the rights because she “didn’t want to give them control over the rest of the story” by selling the rights to the characters, which would have enabled Warner Bros. to make non-author-written sequels.[27]

Although Steven Spielberg initially negotiated to direct the film, he declined the offer.[28] Spielberg reportedly wanted the adaptation to be an animated film, with American actorHaley Joel Osment to provide Harry Potter’s voice,[29] or a film that incorporated elements from subsequent books as well.[3] Spielberg contended that, in his opinion, it was like “shooting ducks in a barrel. It’s just a slam dunk. It’s just like withdrawing a billion dollars and putting it into your personal bank accounts. There’s no challenge.”[30] Rowling maintains that she had no role in choosing directors for the films and that “[a]nyone who thinks I could (or would) have ‘veto-ed’ [ sic ] him [Spielberg] needs their Quick-Quotes Quill serviced.”[31] Heyman recalled that Spielberg decided to direct A.I. Artificial Intelligence instead.[3]

After Spielberg left, talks began with other directors, including: Chris Columbus, Terry Gilliam, Jonathan Demme, Mike Newell, Alan Parker, Wolfgang Petersen, Rob Reiner, Ivan Reitman, Tim Robbins, Brad Silberling, M. Night Shyamalan and Peter Weir.[3][25][32] Petersen and Reiner then both pulled out of the running in March 2000,[33] and the choice was narrowed down to Silberling, Columbus, Parker and Gilliam.[34] Rowling’s first choice director was Terry Gilliam,[35] but Warner Bros. chose Columbus, citing his work on other family films such as Home Alone and Mrs. Doubtfire as influences for their decision.[36] Columbus pitched his vision of the film for two hours, stating that he wanted the Muggle scenes “to be bleak and dreary” but those set in the wizarding world “to be steeped in color, mood, and detail.” He took inspiration from David Lean‘s adaptations of Great Expectations (1946) and Oliver Twist (1948), wishing to use “that sort of darkness, that sort of edge, that quality to the cinematography,” taking the colour designs from Oliver!and The Godfather.[3]

Harry Potter is the kind of timeless literary achievement that comes around once in a lifetime. Since the books have generated such a passionate following across the world, it was important to us to find a director that [sic] has an affinity for both children and magic. I can’t think of anyone more ideally suited for this job than Chris.”
Lorenzo di Bonaventura[36]

Steve Kloves was selected to write the film’s screenplay. He described adapting the book as “tough”, as it did not “lend itself to adaptation as well as the next two books.”[37] Kloves often received synopses of books proposed as film adaptations from Warner Bros., which he “almost never read”,[3] but Harry Potter jumped out at him.[3] He went out and bought the book, and became an instant fan of the series.[37] When speaking to Warner Bros., he stated that the film had to be British, and had to be true to the characters.[37] Kloves was nervous when he first met Rowling as he did not want her to think he was going to “[destroy] her baby.”[3] Rowling admitted that she “was really ready to hate this Steve Kloves,” but recalled her initial meeting with him: “The first time I met him, he said to me, ‘You know who my favourite character is?’ And I thought, You’re gonna say Ron. I know you’re gonna say Ron. But he said ‘Hermione.’ And I just kind of melted.”[3] Rowling received a large amount of creative control, an arrangement that Columbus did not mind.

Warner Bros. had initially planned to release the film over the 4 July 2001 weekend, making for such a short production window that several proposed directors pulled themselves out of the running. However, due to time constraints the date was put back to 16 November 2001.[38]

Filming

A large castle, with a ditch and trees in front of it.

 

Alnwick Castle was used as a principal filming location for Hogwarts.

Two British film industry officials requested that the film be shot in the United Kingdom, offering their assistance in securing filming locations, the use of Leavesden Film Studios, as well as changing the UK’s child labour laws (adding a small number of working hours per week and making the timing of on-set classes more flexible).[3] Warner Bros. accepted their proposal. Filming began in September 2000 at Leavesden Film Studios and concluded on March 23, 2001,[39] with final work being done in July.[25][40] Principal photography took place on 2 October 2000 at North Yorkshire‘s Goathland railway station.[41] Canterbury Cathedral and Scotland’s Inverailort Castle were both touted as possible locations for Hogwarts; Canterbury rejected Warner Bros. proposal due to concerns about the film’s “pagan” theme.[42][43] Alnwick Castle and Gloucester Cathedral were eventually selected as the principal locations for Hogwarts,[3] with some scenes also being filmed at Harrow School.[44] Other Hogwarts scenes were filmed in Durham Cathedral over a two-week period;[45] these included shots of the corridors and some classroom scenes.[46] Oxford University’s Divinity School served as the Hogwarts Hospital Wing, and Duke Humfrey’s Library, part of theBodleian, was used as the Hogwarts Library.[47] Filming for Privet Drive took place on Picket Post Close in Bracknell, Berkshire.[45] Filming in the street took two days instead of the planned single day, so payments to the street’s residents were correspondingly increased.[45] For all of the subsequent film’s scenes set in Privet Drive, filming took place on a constructed set in Leavesden Film Studios, which proved to have been cheaper than filming on location.[48] London’s Australia House was selected as the location for Gringotts Wizarding Bank,[3] while Christ Church, Oxford was the location for the Hogwarts trophy room.[49] London Zoo was used as the location for the scene in which Harry accidentally sets a snake on Dudley,[49] with King’s Cross Station also being used as the book specifies.[50]

A building painted blue, with a sign reading "The Glass House". An advertisement on glasses is affixed on the door.

 

The store in London used as the exterior of The Leaky Cauldron.

Because the film’s American title was different, all scenes that mention the philosopher’s stone by name had to be re-shot, once with the actors saying “philosopher’s” and once with “sorcerer’s”.[25] The children filmed for four hours and then did three hours of schoolwork. They also developed a liking for fake facial injuries from the makeup staff. Radcliffe was initially meant to wear green contact lenses as his eyes are blue, and not green like Harry’s, but the lenses gave Radcliffe extreme irritation, and, upon consultation with Rowling, it was agreed that Harry could have blue eyes.[51]

Design and special effects

Judianna Makovsky designed the film costumes. She re-designed the Quidditch robes, having initially planned to use those shown on the cover of the American book, but deemed them “a mess.” Instead, she dressed the Quidditch players in “preppie sweaters, 19th century fencing breeches and arm guards.”[52] Production designer Stuart Craig built the sets at Leavesden Studios, including Hogwarts Great Hall, basing it on many English cathedrals. Although originally asked to use an existing old street to film the Diagon Alley scenes, Craig decided to build his own set, comprising Tudor, Georgian and Queen Anne architecture.[52]

Columbus originally planned to use both animatronics and CGI animation to create the film’s magical creatures, including Fluffy.[7] Nick Dudman, who worked on Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace, was given the task of creating the needed prosthetics for the film, with Jim Henson’s Creature Shop providing creature effects.[53] John Coppinger stated that the magical creatures that needed to be created for the film had to be designed multiple times.[54] The film features nearly 600 special effects shots, involving numerous companies. Industrial Light & Magic created Lord Voldemort‘s face on the back of Quirrell, Rhythm & Hues animated Norbert; and Sony Pictures Imageworksproduced the film’s Quidditch scenes.[3]

Music

 

John Williams

John Williams was selected to compose the film’s score.[55] Williams composed the score at his homes in Los Angeles and Tanglewood before recording it in London in August 2001. One of the main themes is entitled “Hedwig’s Theme”; Williams retained it for his finished score as “everyone seemed to like it”.[56]

Differences from the book

Columbus repeatedly checked with Rowling to make sure he was getting minor details in the film correct.[53] Kloves described the film as being “really faithful” to the book. He added some dialogue, of which Rowling approved. One of the lines originally included had to be removed after Rowling told him that it would directly contradict an event in the then-unreleased Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix novel.[57]

Several minor characters have been removed from the film version, most prominent among them the spectral History of Magic teacher, Professor Binns, and Peeves the poltergeist. The book’s first chapter is from the viewpoint of Vernon and Petunia Dursley the day before they are given Harry to look after, highlighting how non-magical people react to magic. The film removes this, beginning with Professor Dumbledore, Professor McGonagall and Hagrid leaving Harry with the Dursleys (although McGonagall tells Dumbledore how she had been watching the Dursleys all day). Harry’s less than pleasant times at Mrs. Figg’s are cut from the film while the boa constrictor from Brazil in the zoo becomes a Burmese Python in the film. Some conflicts, such as Harry and Draco’s encounter with each other in Madam Malkin’s robe shop and midnight duel, are not in the film. Some of Nicolas Flamel‘s role is changed or cut altogether. Norbert is mentioned to have been taken away by Dumbledore in the film; whilst the book sees Harry and Hermione have to take him by hand to Charlie Weasley‘s friends. Rowling described the scene as “the one part of the book that she felt [could easily] be changed”.[52] As such, the reason for the detention in the Forbidden Forest is also changed: In the novel, Harry and Hermione are put in detention for being caught by Filch when leaving the Astronomy Tower after hours, Neville and Malfoy are also given detention when they are caught in the corridor by Professor McGonagall, while in the film, Harry, Hermione and Ron receive detention after Malfoy catches them in Hagrid’s hut after hours (Malfoy however, is also given detention for being out of bed after hours). Firenze the centaur, who is described in the book as being palomino with light blonde hair, is shown to be dark in the film.[58] Additionally, the Quidditch pitch is altered from a traditional stadium to an open field circled by spectator towers.[52]

No 24 highest grossing Film in all time

The Lion King

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
The Lion King
In an African savannah, several animals stare at a lion atop a tall rock. A lion's head can be seen in the clouds above. Atop the image is the text "Walt Disney Pictures presents The Lion King".

Theatrical release poster by John Alvin[1]
Directed by
Produced by Don Hahn
Written by
Starring
Music by Hans Zimmer
Edited by Ivan Bilancio
Production
company
Distributed by Buena Vista Pictures
Release dates
  • June 15, 1994
Running time
88 minutes[2]
Country United States
Language English
Budget $45 million[3]
Box office $987.5 million[3]

The Lion King is a 1994 American animated epic musical film produced by Walt Disney Feature Animation and released by Walt Disney Pictures. It is the 32nd animated feature in the Walt Disney Animated Classics series. The story takes place in a kingdom oflions in Africa, and was influenced by the biblical tales of Joseph and Moses and William Shakespeare‘s famous play, Hamlet. The film was produced during a period known as the Disney Renaissance. The Lion King was directed by Roger Allers and Rob Minkoff, produced by Don Hahn, and has a screenplay credited to Irene Mecchi, Jonathan Roberts and Linda Woolverton. Its original songs were written by composer Elton John and lyricist Tim Rice, and original scores were written by Hans Zimmer. The film features anensemble voice cast that includes Matthew Broderick, James Earl Jones, Jeremy Irons, Jonathan Taylor Thomas, Moira Kelly,Nathan Lane, Ernie Sabella, Rowan Atkinson, Robert Guillaume, Madge Sinclair, Whoopi Goldberg, Cheech Marin, and Jim Cummings.

The Lion King tells the story of Simba, a young lion who is to succeed his father, Mufasa, as king; however, after Simba’s uncle Scar murders Mufasa, Simba is manipulated into thinking he was responsible and flees into exile in shame and despair. Upon maturation living with two wastrels, Simba is given some valuable perspective from his childhood friend, Nala, and his shaman, Rafiki, before returning to challenge Scar to end his tyranny.

Development of The Lion King began in 1988 during a meeting between Jeffrey Katzenberg, Roy E. Disney and Peter Schneiderwhile promoting Oliver & Company in Europe. Thomas Disch wrote a film treatment, and Woolverton developed the first scripts while George Scribner was signed on as director, being later joined by Allers. Production began in 1991 concurrently withPocahontas, which wound up attracting most of Disney’s top animators. Some time after the staff traveled to Hell’s Gate National Park in Kenya to research on the film’s setting and animals, Scribner left production disagreeing with the decision to turn the film into a musical, and was replaced by Minkoff. When Hahn joined the project, he was dissatisfied with the script and the story was promptly rewritten. Nearly 20 minutes of animation sequences took place at Disney-MGM Studios in Florida. Computer animationwas also used in several scenes, most notably in the wildebeest stampede sequence.

The Lion King was released on June 15, 1994, to a positive reaction from critics, who praised the film for its music, story and animation; it finished its run as the highest-grossing release of 1994. Following a 3D re-release in 2011, with earnings of over US $987 million worldwide as of 2011, the film is the highest-grossing hand-drawn animated film in history, the highest-grossing 2D animated film in the United States, the third highest-grossing animated film of all time, and the 23rd-highest-grossing feature film of all time. The Lion King garnered two Academy Awards for its achievement in music and the Golden Globe Award for Best Motion Picture – Musical or Comedy. The film has led to many derived works, such as a Broadway adaptation; two direct-to-video follow-ups—the sequel The Lion King II: Simba’s Pride (1998) and the prequel/parallel The Lion King 1½ (2004)—and two television series, Timon and Pumbaa and the upcoming The Lion Guard.

Plot

In the Pride Lands of Africa, a lion rules over the animals as king. The birth of King Mufasa and Queen Sarabi’s son Simba creates envy and resentment in Mufasa’s younger brother, Scar, who knows his nephew now replaces him as heir to the throne. After Simba has grown into a young cub, Mufasa gives him a tour of the Pride Lands, teaching him the responsibilities of being a king and the circle of life. Later that day, Scar tricks Simba and his best friend Nala into exploring a forbidden elephant graveyard, despite the protests of Mufasa’s hornbill majordomo Zazu. At the graveyard, three spotted hyenas named Shenzi, Banzai and Ed attack the cubs before Mufasa, alerted by Zazu, rescues them and forgives Simba for his actions. That night, the hyenas, who are allied with Scar, plot with him to kill Mufasa and Simba.

The next day Scar lures Simba to a gorge and tells him to wait there while he gets Mufasa. On Scar’s orders, the hyenas stampede a large herd of wildebeest into the gorge. Mufasa rescues Simba, but as Mufasa tries to climb up the gorge’s walls, Scar throws him back into the stampede, where he is trampled to death. After Simba finds Mufasa’s body, Scar convinces him he was responsible for his father’s death and advises Simba to flee the kingdom. As Simba leaves, Scar orders Shenzi, Banzai and Ed to kill the cub, but Simba escapes. That night, Scar announces to the pride that both Mufasa and Simba were killed in the stampede and steps forward as the new king, allowing a pack of hyenas to live in the Pride Lands.

After running far away, Simba collapses from exhaustion in a desert. Timon and Pumbaa, a meerkat and a warthog, find him and nurse him back to health. Simba subsequently grows up with them in the jungle, living a carefree life with his friends under the motto “hakuna matata” (“no worries” in Swahili). When he is a young adult, Simba rescues Timon and Pumbaa from a hungry lioness, who turns out to be Nala. She and Simba reconcile and fall in love. Nala urges Simba to return home, telling him the Pride Lands have become a wasteland with not enough food and water. Feeling guilty over his father’s death, Simba refuses and storms off, leaving Nala disappointed and angry. As Simba exits the jungle, he encounters Mufasa’s mandrill friend and advisor, Rafiki. Rafiki tells Simba that Mufasa is “alive” and takes him to a pond. There Simba is visited by the ghost of Mufasa in the sky, who tells him he must take his rightful place as the king of the Pride Lands. Simba realizes he can no longer run from his past and goes home. Nala, Timon, and Pumbaa join him, and agree to help him fight.

At the Pride Lands, Simba sees Scar hit Sarabi and confronts him, but Scar taunts Simba over his “part” in Mufasa’s death. However, when Scar pushes Simba to the edge of Pride Rock, he reveals that he killed Mufasa. Enraged, Simba roars back up and forces Scar to reveal the truth to the pride. Timon, Pumbaa, Rafiki, Zazu, and the lionesses fend off the hyenas while Scar, attempting to escape, is cornered by Simba at the top of Pride Rock. Scar begs Simba for mercy, saying he is family and placing the blame on the hyenas. Simba says he does not believe Scar anymore but spares his life and commands him to forever leave the Pride Lands. Scar meekly walks past him, but then attacks his nephew. After a fierce fight, Simba throws his uncle off Pride Rock. Scar survives the fall, but is attacked and eaten alive by the hyenas, who overheard his attempt to betray them.

With Scar and the hyenas gone, Simba ascends to the top of Pride Rock and takes over the kingdom as the rain falls again. Sometime later, with Pride Rock restored to its former glory, Simba looks down happily at his kingdom with Nala, Timon, and Pumbaa by his side; Rafiki presents Simba and Nala’s newborn cub to the inhabitants of the Pride Lands, and the “circle of life” continues.

The Dark Knight (film)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
This article is about the film. For other uses, see Dark Knight.
The Dark Knight
Dark Knight.jpg

Theatrical release poster
Directed by Christopher Nolan
Produced by
Screenplay by
Story by
Based on Characters appearing in comic books published 
by DC Comics
Starring
Music by
Cinematography Wally Pfister
Edited by Lee Smith
Production
companies
Distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures
Release dates
  • July 14, 2008(New York City)
  • July 18, 2008(United States)
  • July 24, 2008(United Kingdom)
Running time
152 minutes[1]
Country
  • United Kingdom[2]
  • United States[2]
Language English
Budget $185 million[3]
Box office $1.005 billion[3]

The Dark Knight is a 2008 superhero film directed, produced, and co-written by Christopher Nolan. Based on the DC Comicscharacter Batman, the film is the second part of Nolan’s Batman film series and a sequel to 2005’s Batman Begins, starringChristian Bale, Michael Caine, Heath Ledger, Gary Oldman, Aaron Eckhart, Maggie Gylenhaal and Morgan Freeman. With the help of police lieutenant James Gordon (Oldman) and newly elected district attorney Harvey Dent (Eckhart), Batman (Bale) raises the stakes on his war on crime by setting out to dismantle the remaining mafia groups that plague the streets. The partnership proves effective, until the mob draw Batman into combat with stopping a criminal lunatic known as “the Joker” (Ledger) from unleashing a reign of chaos that would plunge Gotham City into becoming an anarchy.

Nolan’s inspiration for the film was the Joker’s comic book debut in 1940, the 1988 graphic novel The Killing Joke, and the 1996 series The Long Halloween, which retold Two-Face‘s origin. The nickname “the Dark Knight” was first applied to Batman in Batman#1 (1940), in a story written by Bill Finger.[4][5] The Dark Knight was filmed primarily in Chicago, as well as in several other locations in the United States, the United Kingdom, and Hong Kong. Nolan used IMAX 70 mm film cameras to film some sequences, including the Joker’s first appearance in the film. The film is dedicated to Heath Ledger, who died on January 22, 2008, some months after the completed filming and six months before the film’s release, from a toxic combination of prescription drugs, leading to intense attention from the press and movie-going public. Warner Bros. initially created a viral marketing campaign for The Dark Knight, developing promotional websites and trailers highlighting screenshots of Ledger as the Joker.

A co-production of the United States and the United Kingdom, The Dark Knight was released on July 16, 2008 in Australia, on July 18, 2008 in North America, and on July 24, 2008 in the United Kingdom. Considered by film critics to be one of the best films of the 2000s and one of the best superhero films ever,[6][7] the film received highly positive reviews and set numerous records during its theatrical run.[8] The Dark Knight appeared on more critics’ top ten lists (287) than any other film of 2008 with the exception ofWALL-E, and more critics (77) named The Dark Knight the best film of 2008 than any other film released that year.[9] With over $1 billion in revenue worldwide, it is the 23rd-highest-grossing film of all time, unadjusted for inflation.[10] The film received eightAcademy Award nominations; it won the award for Best Sound Editing and Ledger was posthumously awarded Best Supporting Actor.[11] The Dark Knight Rises, the final film in the trilogy, was released on July 20, 2012.

Plot

A Gotham City mob bank is robbed by a group of clown thugs, killing each other one by one until the sole survivor reveals itself to be the Joker, and he flees.

District attorney Harvey Dent leads a campaign against the organized crime in the city, to the applause of its citizens. Through Gordon, he requests to collaborate with the Batman, and lends Gordon a petitioned search warrant for five banks with suspected mob ties. Wayne Enterprises cancels its deals with Chinese accountant Lau as CEO Lucius Fox questions Lau’s legality. Bruce Wayne intrudes on Dent’s date with Rachel Dawes and offers support to the DA through a fundraiser.

Mob leaders Maroni, Gambol and the Chechen holds a videoconference with Lau, who has taken their funds and fled to Hong Kong. The Joker interrupts, warns that Batman is unhindered by the law and offers to kill him in exchange for half of their money. Gambol instead puts a bounty on the Joker, and some time later, the Joker kills him.

Batman finds Lau in Hong Kong and brings him back to Gotham to testify against the mob, and Dent places 549 criminals in custody. On TV, the Joker sends out a threat that each day Batman doesn’t reveal his identity people will die; and as a result Commissioner Loeb and the judge who was presiding the mob trials are killed, but fails to kill Dent and Rachel. He also fails to kill Mayor Anthony Garcia at Commissioner Loeb’s funeral, as Gordon sacrifices himself and Dent finds that Rachel is the Joker’s next target.

Bruce decides to reveal his identity, but Dent publicly admits being Batman before Bruce can do so, upsetting Rachel. Dent is taken into protective custody, but the Joker appears, and chases Dent across the city. Batman comes to Dent’s rescue and Gordon, who faked his death, arrests the Joker. With the Joker behind bars awaiting trial, Gordon is promoted to Commissioner. Rachel and Dent go missing that night and Batman interrogates the Joker. The situation heats up, as the Joker taunts Batman before revealing that Rachel and Dent have been trapped in separate locations rigged with explosives. Batman races to save Rachel, while Gordon and his men head off to save Dent. Batman arrives at the building where Rachel is supposed to be, but Dent is there, implying that the Joker had intentionally mixed up the addresses. Batman rescues Dent just as the building explodes, but Dent suffers hideous burns on one half of his face. Meanwhile, Gordon fails to save Rachel, who is killed in the explosion. The Joker escapes with Lau, killing him and the Chechen along with the mob’s money.

Dent is immediately taken to the hospital. Alfred Pennyworth, Bruces butler, discovers a letter from Rachel addressed to Bruce, saying that she could no longer wait for the time when Gotham no longer needed Batman so that she and Bruce could finally be together. The letter also says that she loved Dent and intended to marry him. Alfred plans to give the letter to Bruce while serving him breakfast, but decides not to do so when sees how distraught Bruce is over Rachel’s death. Bruce blames himself for what that has happened, but Alfred brings him back on his feet with his wisdom. Coleman Reese, an accountant who has independently discovered Wayne’s identity, plans to reveal the secret. The Joker announces that he will destroy a hospital if Reese isn’t dead in one hour. Gordon and Bruce (in his civilian identity) save Reese, while the Joker visits Dent in the hospital. He convinces Dent to seek revenge, and blows up the hospital, escaping with a bus of hostages. Meanwhile a vengeful Dent hunts down the criminals and law-enforcement officials who were involved in Rachel’s death, flipping his two-headed Peace dollar to determine their fates.

By nightfall, two ferries, separately containing civilians and criminals, are rigged with explosives. The Joker, who is hiding in the under-construction Prewitt Building, tells the passengers of both ferries that one ferry must blow up the other, or he will destroy both of them by midnight. The criminals, and then the civilians, both refuse, preferring death to murder. Batman teams up with Fox, who is reluctantly using a tracking device in order to locate the Joker. Gordon and his SWAT team arrives next to Prewitt Building, and spots the Joker’s men and hostages. However, it turns out that the Joker had dressed the hostages as his men, forcing the SWAT team to attack them. Batman appears, stops the SWAT team and sets the hostages free. Batman confronts the Joker, who quickly gets the upper hand by having his dogs attack Batman. He the proceeds to ambush Batman and traps him under a wodden column. The clock strikes midnight, but when an irritated Joker realizes that no one on the ferries had blown up the other, he pulls out his own detonator. Batman breaks free and tosses the Joker off the building, and immediately saves him by catching him in mid-air with his grappling gun. But the defeated Joker gloats that he has won, since the people of Gotham will lose hope when Dent’s rampage becomes known. The Joker is finally arrested, but not before reminding Batman that their battle will last forever.

Dent lures Gordon to the building where Rachel died. He finds his family held hostage by Dent, who strucks him down before he can do anything. Batman confronts Dent who proceeds to determine his, Batman’s and Gordon’s son’s fate by flipping a coin. He shoots Batman in the abdomen, spares himself, and flips one last time in order to determine the boy’s fate. But before the coin lands on Dent’s hand, Batman (who was wearing body armor) tackles Dent off the building and saves the boy, while Dent falls to his death. Batman falls as well, but survives. Gordon sadly admits that the Joker has won, but Batman takes the blame for Dent’s crimes in order to spare Dent’s image as a public hero. Alfred burns Rachel’s letter and Fox destroys the tracking device used earlier. Gordon initiates a manhunt for Batman, who disappears into the night.

The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The Hobbit:
An Unexpected Journey
The Hobbit- An Unexpected Journey.jpeg

Theatrical release poster
Directed by Peter Jackson
Produced by
Screenplay by
Based on The Hobbit
by J. R. R. Tolkien
Starring
Music by Howard Shore
Cinematography Andrew Lesnie
Edited by Jabez Olssen
Production
company
Distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures
Release dates
  • November 28, 2012(Wellington premiere)
  • December 12, 2012(New Zealand)
  • December 14, 2012(United States)
Running time
169 minutes[1]
Country
  • New Zealand
  • United States[2]
Language English
Budget $200–315 million[3][4]
Box office $1.021 billion[5]

The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey is a 2012 high fantasy adventure film directed by Peter Jackson. It is the first installment in a three-part film adaptation based on the 1937 novel The Hobbit by J. R. R. Tolkien. It is followed by The Desolation of Smaug(2013) and The Battle of the Five Armies (2014), and together they act as a prequel to Jackson’s The Lord of the Rings film trilogy. The film’s screenplay was written by Peter Jackson, his longtime collaborators Fran Walsh and Philippa Boyens, and Guillermo del Toro, who was originally chosen to direct the film before leaving the project in 2010.

The story is set in Middle-earth sixty years before the events of The Lord of the Rings, and portions of the film are adapted from the appendices to Tolkien’s The Return of the King.[6] An Unexpected Journey tells the tale of Bilbo Baggins (Martin Freeman), who is convinced by the wizard Gandalf the Grey (Ian McKellen) to accompany thirteen Dwarves, led by Thorin Oakenshield (Richard Armitage), on a quest to reclaim the Lonely Mountain from the dragon Smaug. The ensemble cast also includes James Nesbitt, Ken Stott, Cate Blanchett, Ian Holm, Christopher Lee, Hugo Weaving, Elijah Wood and Andy Serkis, and features Sylvester McCoy,Barry Humphries and Manu Bennett.

An Unexpected Journey premiered on November 28, 2012 in New Zealand and was released internationally on December 12, 2012.[7] The film has grossed over $1 billion at the box office, surpassing both The Fellowship of the Ring and The Two Towersnominally, becoming the fourth highest-grossing film of 2012 and the 18th highest grossing film of all time. The film was nominated for three Academy Awards for Best Visual Effects, Best Production Design, and Best Makeup and Hairstyling.[8] It was also nominated for three BAFTA Awards.[9]

Plot

Approaching his 111th birthday, the hobbit Bilbo Baggins begins writing down the full story of his adventure 60 years earlier for the benefit of his nephew Frodo. This connects The Hobbit with The Lord of the Rings movie 10 years earlier which had a similar scene. Long before Bilbo’s involvement, the Dwarf king Thrór brings an era of prosperity for his kin under the Lonely Mountain, far to the East, until the arrival of the dragon Smaug. Destroying the nearby town of Dale, Smaug drives the Dwarves out of their mountain and takes their hoard of gold. Thrór’s grandson Thorin sees King Thranduil and his Wood-elves on a nearby hillside, and is dismayed when they take their leave rather than aid his people, resulting in Thorin’s everlasting hatred of Elves.

In the Shire, 50-year-old Bilbo is tricked by the wizard Gandalf the Grey into hosting a party for Thorin and his company of dwarves: Balin, Dwalin, Fíli, Kíli, Dori, Nori, Ori, Óin, Glóin, Bifur, Bofur, and Bombur. Gandalf’s aim is to recruit Bilbo as the company’s “burglar” to aid them in their quest to enter the Lonely Mountain. Bilbo is unwilling to accept at first but has a change of heart after the company leaves without him the next day. Traveling onward, the company is captured by three trolls, Tom, Bert & William, after their ponies are captured. Bilbo stalls the trolls from eating them until dawn. Gandalf exposes the trolls to sunlight turning them to stone. They search the trolls’ cave and find treasure and Elven blades. Thorin and Gandalf each take an Elf-made blade—Orcristand Glamdring, respectively. Gandalf also finds an elven shortsword (“Sting“), which he gives to Bilbo.

The wizard Radagast the Brown finds Gandalf and the company, who tells them of an encounter at Dol Guldur with the Necromancer, a sorcerer who has been corrupting Greenwood with dark magic. The company is then chased by orcs on wargs. Radagast covers the company’s escape as Gandalf leads the company through a stone passage to Rivendell. There, Lord Elronddiscloses a hidden indication of a secret door on the company’s map of the Lonely Mountain, which will be visible only on Durin’s Day. Gandalf later approaches the White Council— consisting of Elrond, Galadriel and Saruman the White — about his involvement with the dwarves. He also presents a Morgul blade Radagast obtained from Dol Guldur as a sign that the Necromancer is linked to the Witch-king of Angmar, despite Saruman’s skepticism. When Saruman presses concern to the more present matter of the dwarves and Smaug, requesting that Gandalf put an end to the quest, Gandalf secretly reveals to Galadriel he had anticipated this and had the dwarves move forward without him. Galadriel then asks Gandalf about his motives and encourages him in his quest, promising him that she will come in person to help him, if he should ever need her.

The company journeys into the Misty Mountains where they find themselves amid a colossal battle between storm giants. They take refuge in a cave and are captured byGoblins, who take them to their leader, the Great Goblin in the heart of the mountain. Bilbo becomes separated from the dwarves and falls into a cave where he encountersGollum, who unknowingly drops a golden ring while killing a stray goblin, who attacked Bilbo from earlier, to eat. Pocketing the ring, Bilbo finds himself confronted by Gollum. They play a riddle game, wagering that Bilbo will be shown the way out if he wins or eaten by Gollum if he loses. Bilbo eventually wins by asking Gollum what he has in his pocket. Gollum demands three guesses, as he thinks the question is unfair, but he is unable to get the correct answer. Noticing his ring is lost, Gollum realizes that Bilbo possesses it and chases him. Bilbo discovers that the ring grants him invisibility, but when he has a chance to kill Gollum, Bilbo spares his life and escapes while Gollum shouts his hatred towards the hobbit Baggins.

Meanwhile, the Great Goblin reveals to the dwarves that Azog, an Orc war-chief who beheaded Thrór and lost his forearm to Thorin in battle outside the Dwarven kingdom ofMoria, has placed a bounty on Thorin’s head. Gandalf arrives and leads the dwarves in an escape and kills the Great Goblin. Bilbo exits the mountain and rejoins the company, keeping secret his newly obtained ring. The company is ambushed by Azog and his hunting party, and takes refuge in trees. Thorin charges at Azog, but is overpowered and left defenseless on the ground. Bilbo saves Thorin from the orcs just as the company is rescued by eagles. They escape to the safety of the Carrock where Gandalf is able to revive Thorin, who renounces his previous disdain for Bilbo after being saved by him. In the distance, the company sees the Lonely Mountain, where the sleeping Smaug is awakened by the knocking sound of a thrush.

No 21 highest grossing Film in all time

Alice in Wonderland (2010 film)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
Alice in Wonderland
Alice-In-Wonderland-Theatrical-Poster.jpg

Theatrical release poster
Directed by Tim Burton
Produced by
Screenplay by Linda Woolverton
Based on Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass 
by Lewis Carroll
Starring
Music by Danny Elfman
Cinematography Dariusz Wolski
Edited by Chris Lebenzon
Production
company
Distributed by Walt Disney Studios
Motion Pictures
Release dates
  • February 25, 2010(London)
  • March 5, 2010(United States)
Running time
108 minutes
Country United States
Language English
Budget $150[1][2]–$200[3] million
Box office $1.025 billion[4]

Alice in Wonderland is a 2010 American fantasy film[5] directed by Tim Burton and written by Linda Woolverton. Released by Walt Disney Pictures, the film stars Mia Wasikowska as Alice Kingsleigh with Johnny Depp, Anne Hathaway and Helena Bonham Carter. The film was shot in the United Kingdom and the United States.

The story is a loose retelling of the English author Lewis Carroll‘s 1865 fantasy novel Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and its 1871 sequel Through the Looking-Glass. Wasikowska plays a nineteen-year-old Alice. She is told that she can restore the White Queento her throne because she is the only one who can slay the Jabberwock, a dragon-like creature that is controlled by the Red Queenand terrorizes Underland’s inhabitants.

The film premiered in London at the Odeon Leicester Square on February 25, 2010, and was released in Australia on March 4, 2010, and the following day in the United Kingdom and the United States through IMAX 3D and Disney Digital 3D as well as in traditional theaters.

The film grossed over $1.025 billion worldwide, being Burton’s most successful film to date, but received mixed reviews; although praised for its visual style and special effects, the film was criticized for its lack of narrative, coherence and overuse of computer-generated imagery. At the 83rd Academy Awards, Alice in Wonderland won Best Art Direction and Best Costume Design, and was also nominated for Best Visual Effects. The film generated over $1 billion in ticket sales and, as of May 2015, it is the nineteenthhighest-grossing film of all time.[6] A sequel, titled Alice Through the Looking Glass, is set for a May 27, 2016, release.

Plot

Troubled by a strange recurring dream and mourning the loss of her beloved father, nineteen-year-old Alice Kingsleigh attends a garden party at Lord Ascot’s estate, where she is confronted by an unwanted marriage proposal, to Hamish Ascot, and the stifling expectations of the society in which she lives. Unsure of how to reply, she pursues a rabbit in a blue waistcoat, and accidentally falls into a large rabbit hole, from which she emerges in a forest, where she is greeted by the White Rabbit, the Dormouse, the Dodo, the Talking Flowers, and Tweedledee and Tweedledum. They argue over her identity as “the right Alice”, who must slay the Red Queen’s Jabberwocky and restore the White Queen to power, as foretold by Absolem the Caterpillar. The group is then ambushed by the Bandersnatch and a group of playing-card soldiers led by the Knave of Hearts. Alice, Tweedledum and Tweedledee escape into the woods, while the Knave steals the Caterpillar’s scroll and the Dormouse leaves the others, with one of the Bandersnatch’s eyes. Tweedledum and Tweedledee are then captured by the Red Queen’s Jubjub Bird.

The Knave informs the Red Queen that Alice threatens her reign, and the soldiers and Bayard the Bloodhound are ordered to find Alice immediately. Meanwhile, the Cheshire Cat guides Alice to the March Hare and the Hatter. The Hatter helps Alice avoid capture by allowing himself to be seized instead. Later, Alice is found by Bayard the Bloodhound; but Alice insists upon helping the Hatter. At the Queen’s citadel, the Red Queen is unaware of Alice’s true identity and therefore welcomes her as a guest. Alice learns that the Vorpal Sword, the only weapon capable of killing the Jabberwocky, is locked inside the Bandersnatch’s den. The Knave crudely attempts to seduce Alice, but she rebuffs him, and a jealous Red Queen orders Alice beheaded. Alice obtains the sword and befriends the Bandersnatch by returning its eye; escapes on the back of the Bandersnatch; and delivers the sword to the White Queen. The Cheshire Cat saves the Hatter from the executioner, and the Hatter calls for rebellion against the Red Queen. The rebellion is quickly put down by the Jubjub bird, but the resistance flees to the White Queen’s castle, and both armies prepare for battle. Absolem advises Alice to fight the Jabberwocky, before completing his transformation into a pupa.

On the appointed day, the White and Red Queens gather their armies on a chessboard-like battlefield and send Alice and the Jabberwocky to decide the battle in single combat. Encouraged by the advice of her late father, Alice beheads the Jabberwocky, and the White Queen sends the Red Queen and the Knave into exile. After the Hatter performs a celebration dance called Futterwacken, the White Queen gives Alice a vial of the Jabberwocky’s purple blood, which will take her home. In England, Lord Ascot takes Alice as his apprentice with the idea of establishing oceanic trade routes to China. As the story closes, Alice prepares to set off on a trading ship. A light-blue butterfly lands on her shoulder, which Alice identifies as Absolem.

Cas

  • Mia Wasikowska as Alice Kingsleigh. When creating the character, screenwriter Linda Woolverton researched how young women were expected to behave in the Victorian era and then made her the opposite.[7] Wasikowska read Carroll’s books as a child and re-read them to prepare for her role. She also watched Jan Švankmajer‘s Alice. She said, “When we were kids, my mum would pop it in the VCR player. We would be disturbed, and wouldn’t really understand it, but we couldn’t look away because it was too intriguing. So I had kept that feeling about Alice, a kind of haunting feeling.”[8] Although facing pressures to conform to society’s expectations, Alice grows into a stronger-willed and empowered heroine who chooses her own path; Independent columnist Liz Hoggard praised Alice as a role model for girls, describing the character as “stubborn, brave, [and] non-girlie”.[7][9] Mairi Ella Challen portrayed Alice as a six-year-old.[10]
  • Johnny Depp as Tarrant Hightopp, The Mad Hatter.[11] Wasikowska said that the characters “both feel like outsiders and feel alone in their separate worlds, and have a special bond and friendship.”[12][13] Burton explained that Depp “tried to find a grounding to the character … as opposed to just being mad.”[14] Burton also said that, “In a lot of versions it’s a very one-note kind of character and you know [Depp’s] goal was to try and bring out a human side to the strangeness of the character.”[14] The orange hair is an allusion to the mercury poisoning suffered by hatters who used mercury to cure felt; Depp believes that the character “was poisoned … and it was coming out through his hair, through his fingernails and eyes”.[15] Depp and Burton decided that the Hatter’s clothes, skin, hair, personality and accent would change throughout the film to reflect his emotions.[16] In an interview with Depp, the character was paralleled to “a mood ring, [as] his emotions are very close to the surface”.[17] The Hatter is “made up of different people and their extreme sides”, with a gentle voice much like the character’s creator Lewis Carroll reflecting the lighter personality and with a Scottish Glaswegian accent (which Depp modeled after Gregor Fisher‘s Rab C. Nesbitt character) reflecting a darker, more dangerous personality.[18] Illusionary dancer David “Elsewhere” Bernaldoubled for Depp during the “Futterwacken” sequence near the end of the film.[19]

 

Helena Bonham Carter as the Red Queen. Bonham Carter’s head was digitally increased to three times its original size in the film.

  • Helena Bonham Carter as Iracebeth of Crims, the Red Queen. She is an amalgamation of two Carroll characters: the Red Queenand the Queen of Hearts.[11] Her first name is a play on the word irascible, as she is easily irritated and quick to anger.[20] Bonham Carter’s head was digitally increased to three times its original size on screen.[21][22] The character hates animals, choosing to use them as servants and furniture.[23] The actress took inspiration from her young daughter Nell, a toddler, stating that, “The Red Queen is just like a toddler, because she’s got a big head and she’s a tyrant.”
  • Anne Hathaway as Mirana of Marmoreal, the White Queen.[11] She was one of few characters that did not require digital manipulation.[24] Hathaway summed up her character with a caption on a magnet of Happy Bunny holding a knife; “Cute but psycho. Things even out.”[25] According to Hathaway, “She comes from the same gene pool as the Red Queen. She really likes the dark side, but she’s so scared of going too far into it that she’s made everything appear very light and happy. But she’s living in that place out of fear that she won’t be able to control herself.”[26] Hathaway described her interpretation of the White Queen as “a punk-rock vegan pacifist“, with inspiration drawn from Debbie Harry, Greta Garbo, and the artwork of Dan Flavin.[26] Burton said that the White Queen’s appearance was inspired by Nigella Lawson.[27]
  • Crispin Glover played Ilosovic Stayne, the Knave of Hearts.[11] The character is arrogant and tricky, and while following the Red Queen’s every order, he is the only one capable of calming her dramatic mood swings. Glover said, “The Red Queen has a fair amount of short-tempered reactions to things that people do, and so [the Knave] has to be quite diplomatic.” The Red Queen believes he is her lover, but this proves this to be false.
  • Matt Lucas portrayed both Tweedledee and Tweedledum. Burton commented on the mixture of animation and Lucas, saying that “It’s a weird mixture of things which gives his characters the disturbing quality that they so richly deserve.”[28] The characters are portrayed through a combination of CGI and live-action, with Lucas’ face digitally composited to a full animated body. While performing the character, Lucas had to wear a teardrop-shaped motion capture suit and walk on stilts. In order to play both characters, Lucas was doubled by Ethan Cohn.
  • Frances de la Tour as Imogene, Alice’s aunt.[29] She is suffering from severe delusions and is constantly awaiting her fictional fiancé whom she believes to be a prince
  • Leo Bill as Hamish Ascot, the would-be fiancé of Alice.[29]

Marton Csokas makes a cameo appearance as Alice’s deceased father in the film’s opening scene and Alice’s mother is played by Lindsay Duncan. Lord and Lady Ascot are played by Tim Pigott-Smith and Geraldine James respectively. Eleanor Tomlinson and Eleanor Gecks play the Cathaway sisters, who bear a strong resemblance to Tweedledum and Tweedledee. Jemma Powell appears briefly as Alice’s sister, Margaret, while Margaret’s unfaithful husband Lowell is played by John Hopkins.

No 20 highest grossing Film in all time

Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Illustration depicting various characters of the film, surrounded by a frame which reads at the top "Every saga has a beginning". In the background, there is a close-up of a face with yellow eyes and red and black tattoos. Below the eyes are a bearded man with long hair, a young woman with facepaint and an intricate hat, three spaceships, a short and cylindrical robot besides a humanoid one, a boy wearing gray clothes, a young man wearing a brown robe holding a laser sword, and an alien creature with long ears. At the bottom of the image is the title "Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace" and the credits.

Original theatrical poster by Drew Struzan
DIRECTED BY George Lucas
PRODUCED BY Rick McCallum
WRITTEN BY George Lucas
STARRING Liam Neeson
Ewan McGregor
Natalie Portman
Jake Lloyd
Ian McDiarmid
Anthony Daniels
Kenny Baker
Pernilla August
Frank Oz
MUSIC BY John Williams
CINEMATOGRAPHY David Tattersall
EDITED BY Ben Burtt
Paul Martin Smith
PRODUCTION
COMPANY
DISTRIBUTED BY 20th Century Fox1
RELEASE DATES
  • May 19, 1999
RUNNING TIME
133 minutes[1]
COUNTRY United States
LANGUAGE English
BUDGET $115 million[2]
BOX OFFICE $1.027 billion[2]

Star Wars Episode I: The Phantom Menace is a 1999 American epic space-opera film written and directed by George Lucas, produced by Lucasfilm and distributed by 20th Century Fox. The first installment in the Star Wars prequel trilogy, the film stars Liam Neeson, Ewan McGregor, Natalie Portman, Jake Lloyd, Ian McDiarmid, Anthony Daniels, Kenny Baker, Pernilla August and Frank Oz. The film was Lucas’ first production as a film director after a 22-year hiatus following the original Star Wars film, and chronologically the first in the Star Wars saga.

The film’s narrative follows the Jedi Knight Qui-Gon Jinn and his apprentice Obi-Wan Kenobi. They escort and protect Queen Amidala, who is traveling from the planet Naboo to the planet Coruscant, hoping to find a peaceful end to a large-scale interplanetary trade dispute. The story also features a young Anakin Skywalker before he became a Jedi; he is introduced as a young slave boy who appears to have unusually strong nascent powers of the Force and must contend with the mysterious return of the Sith.

Lucas began production of this film after he concluded that film special effects had advanced to the level he wanted for the fourth film in the saga. Filming started on June 26, 1997, at locations including Leavesden Film Studios and the Tunisian desert. Its visual effects included extensive use of computer-generated imagery (CGI); some of its characters and settings were completelycomputerized and did not exist in the real world.

The Phantom Menace was released to theaters on May 19, 1999, sixteen years after the premiere of the previous Star Wars film,Star Wars Episode VI: Return of the Jedi. The film’s premiere was extensively covered by media and was greatly anticipated because of the large cultural following the Star Wars saga had cultivated. Despite mixed reviews by critics, who tended to praise the visuals and action sequences but criticized the writing, characterization and acting, it grossed more than US$924.3 million worldwide during its initial theatrical run, making it the second-highest-grossing film worldwide at the time—behind Titanic. It became the highest-grossing film of 1999, the highest-grossing Star Wars film, and is currently the sixth-highest-grossing film in North Americaunadjusted for inflation. A 3D reissue, which has earned an additional US$102.7 million at the box office and brought the film’s overall worldwide takings to over US$1 billion, was released in February 2012. The film was followed by two sequels, Star Wars Episode II: Attack of the Clones and Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith.

Plot

In response to taxation on trade routes in the Galactic Republic, the Trade Federation organizes a blockade of battleships around the planet Naboo. Supreme Chancellor Valorum dispatches Jedi Master Qui-Gon Jinn and his apprentice Obi-Wan Kenobi to negotiate with the Trade Federation leadership to end the blockade. Darth Sidious, a Sith Lord and the Trade Federation’s secret adviser, orders Federation Viceroy Nute Gunray to kill the Jedi and invade Naboo with an army of battle droids. The Jedi flee to Naboo, where Qui-Gon saves Gungan outcast Jar Jar Binks from being killed during the invasion. Indebted to the Jedi, Jar Jar leads them to an underwater Gungan city. There the Jedi try but fail to persuade the Gungan leader, Boss Nass into helping the people of Naboo, though they are able to obtain transportation to Theed, the capital city on the surface. They rescue Queen Amidala, the ruler of the Naboo people, and escape the planet on her royal starship, which is damaged as they pass the Federation blockade.

Amidala’s ship is unable to sustain its hyperdrive and lands for repairs on the desert planet Tatooine. Qui-Gon, Jar Jar, astromech droid R2-D2, and Amidala’s handmaiden Padmé visit the settlement of Mos Espa to buy new parts at a junk shop. There they meet the shop’s owner Watto and his nine-year-old slave Anakin Skywalker, who is a giftedPodracer pilot and engineer, and has created a protocol droid called C-3PO. Qui-Gon senses a strong presence of the Force within Anakin and is convinced that he is the “chosen one” of Jedi prophecy who will bring balance to the Force. Qui-Gon wagers Anakin’s freedom with Watto in a Podrace, which Anakin wins. Anakin joins the group to be trained as a Jedi, leaving his mother Shmi behind. En route to their repaired starship, Qui-Gon enters a brief lightsaber duel with Darth Maul, Darth Sidious’ Sith apprentice who was sent to capture Amidala.

The Jedi escort Amidala to the Republic capital planet Coruscant so she can plead her people’s case to Chancellor Valorum in the Galactic Senate. Qui-Gon asks the Jedi Council to train Anakin as a Jedi, but the Council are concerned that Anakin is vulnerable to the dark side of the Force and decline. Undaunted, Qui-Gon vows to train Anakin himself. Meanwhile, Naboo senator Palpatine persuades Amidala to make a vote of no confidence in Valorum to elect a more capable chancellor to resolve the crisis on Naboo. Though she pushes for the vote, Amidala grows frustrated with the corruption in the Senate and decides to return to Naboo with the Jedi.

On Naboo, Padmé reveals herself to the Gungans as Queen Amidala and persuades them into an alliance against the Trade Federation. Jar Jar leads his people in a battle against the droid army while Padmé leads the hunt for Gunray in Theed, eventually capturing him and his aide, Rune Haako. In a starship hangar, Anakin enters a vacant starfighter and inadvertently triggers its autopilot, joining the battle against the Federation droid control ship in space. Anakin ventures into the ship and destroys it from within, deactivating the droid army. Meanwhile, Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan battle Darth Maul, who mortally wounds Qui-Gon before being bisected and knocked down a pit by Obi-Wan. As he dies, Qui-Gon asks Obi-Wan to train Anakin. Subsequently, Palpatine is elected as the new Supreme Chancellor and Gunray is formally arrested. The Jedi Council makes Obi-Wan a fully fledged Jedi Knight and reluctantly accepts Anakin as Obi-Wan’s apprentice. At a festive ceremony, Padmé presents a gift of appreciation and friendship to the Gungans.

No 19 highest grossing Film in all time

Jurassic Park (film)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
Jurassic Park
A black poster featuring a red shield with a stylized Tyrannosaurus skeleton under a plaque reading "Jurassic Park". Below is the tagline "An Adventure 65 Million Years In the Making".

Theatrical release poster
Directed by Steven Spielberg
Produced by
Screenplay by
Based on Jurassic Park 
by Michael Crichton
Starring
Music by John Williams
Cinematography Dean Cundey
Edited by Michael Kahn
Production
company
Distributed by Universal Pictures
Release dates
Running time
127 minutes[1]
Country United States
Language English
Budget $63 million[2]
Box office $1.029 billion[2]

Jurassic Park is a 1993 American science fiction adventure film directed by Steven Spielberg. The first installment of theJurassic Park franchise, it is based on the 1990 novel of the same name by Michael Crichton, with a screenplay written by Crichton and David Koepp. The film is set on the fictional Isla Nublar, an islet located off Central America‘s Pacific Coast, nearCosta Rica, where a billionaire philanthropist and a small team of genetic scientists have created a wildlife park of cloneddinosaurs.

Before Crichton’s novel was published, four studios put in bids for the film rights. With the backing of Universal Studios, Spielberg acquired the rights for $1.5 million before publication in 1990; Crichton was hired for an additional $500,000 to adapt the novel for the screen. David Koepp wrote the final draft, which left out much of the novel’s exposition and violence and made numerous changes to the characters. Filming took place in California and Hawaii between August and November 1992, and post-production rolled until May 1993, supervised by Spielberg in Poland as he filmed Schindler’s List. The dinosaurs were created with groundbreaking computer-generated imagery by Industrial Light & Magic and with life-sized animatronic dinosaurs built byStan Winston‘s team. To showcase the film’s sound design, which included a mixture of various animal noises for the dinosaur roars, Spielberg invested in the creation of DTS, a company specializing in digital surround sound formats.

Following an extensive $65 million marketing campaign, which included licensing deals with 100 companies, Jurassic Parkgrossed over $900 million worldwide in its original theatrical run. It surpassed Spielberg’s 1982 film E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial to become the highest-grossing film at the time (a distinction it would yield to Titanic four years later), and was well received by critics, who praised its special effects, John Williams‘ musical score, and Spielberg’s direction. Following a 3D re-release in 2013 to celebrate its 20th anniversary, Jurassic Park became the 17th film to surpass $1 billion in ticket sales, and the film still ranks among the 20 highest-grossing films ever. The film won more than 20 awards (including 3 Academy Awards), mostly for its technical achievements. Jurassic Park is considered a landmark in the development of computer-generated imagery and animatronic visual effects. The film was followed by three commercially successful sequels, The Lost World: Jurassic Park(1997), Jurassic Park III (2001), and Jurassic World (2015), with a fifth installment scheduled for a 2018 release.

Plot

John Hammond, the founder and CEO of bioengineering company InGen, has created a theme park called Jurassic Park on Isla Nublar, a tropical island populated with cloned dinosaurs. After a park worker is killed by a Velociraptor, the park’s investors, represented by lawyer Donald Gennaro, demand that experts visit the park and certify it as safe. Gennaro invites the mathematician Ian Malcolm while Hammond invites paleontologist Dr. Alan Grant and paleobotanist Dr. Ellie Sattler. Upon arrival, the group is stunned to see three Brachiosaurus and a herd of Parasaurolophus in the distance.

At the visitor center, the group learns during a laboratory tour that the cloning was accomplished by extracting the DNA of dinosaurs from mosquitoes that had been preserved in amber. The DNA strands were incomplete, so DNA from frogs was used to fill in the gaps. The dinosaurs were all cloned genetically as females in order to prevent breeding.

The group is then joined by Hammond’s grandchildren, Lex and Tim Murphy for a tour of the park, while Hammond oversees the trip from the park’s control room. The tour does not go as planned, with the dinosaurs failing to appear and a Triceratops becoming ill. As a tropical storm approaches Isla Nublar, the tour is cut short. Most of the park employees depart on a boat for the mainland and the visitors return to the electric tour vehicles, except Ellie, who stays with the park’s veterinarian to study the Triceratops.

During the storm, as night falls, Jurassic Park’s computer programmer, Dennis Nedry, who has been bribed by a corporate rival to steal dinosaur embryos, deactivates the park’s security system to allow him access to the embryo storage room. The power goes out, and the tour vehicles become stuck. Most of the park’s electric fences are deactivated, allowing the Tyrannosaurus rex to escape and attack the tour group. Grant, Lex, and Tim narrowly escape while the Tyrannosaurus devours Gennaro, injures Malcolm, and pushes one of the vehicles over an embankment. On his way to deliver the embryos to the island’s docks, Nedry becomes lost in the dark, crashes his Jeep, and is killed by a Dilophosaurus.

Sattler assists the park’s game warden, Robert Muldoon, in a search for survivors, but they only find Malcolm before the Tyrannosaurus rex returns. They escape in one of the vehicles. Unable to decipher Nedry’s code to reactivate the security system, Hammond and the park’s chief engineer Ray Arnold opt to reboot the entire park’s system. The group shuts down the park’s grid and retreats to an emergency bunker, while Arnold heads to a maintenance shed to complete the rebooting process. When he fails to return, Sattler and Muldoon head to the shed as well. They discover the shutdown has deactivated the remaining fences and released the Velociraptors; Muldoon distracts the raptors while Sattler turns the power back on. She discovers Arnold’s severed arm and escapes. Soon after, the raptors ambush and kill Muldoon.

Grant, Tim, and Lex discover the broken shells of dinosaur eggs. Grant concludes that the dinosaurs have been breeding, which occurred because they have the genetic coding of frog DNA — West African bullfrogs can change their sex in a single-sex environment, making the dinosaurs able to do so as well. On the way back to the visitor center, the trio encounter a herd of Gallimimus, when suddenly the Tyrannosaurus emerges from seemingly nowhere and kills one. Grant, Tim and Lex reach the visitor center, and Grant leaves them there as he goes searching for the others. After finding the bunker, Grant and Sattler head back to the visitor center, where the children successfully evade two Velociraptors. The four head to the control room, where Lex restores full power, allowing the group to call for help. While trying to leave, they are cornered by the raptors, but escape when the Tyrannosaurus suddenly appears and kills both raptors, ignoring the humans. Hammond arrives in a jeep with Malcolm, and the entire group flees together. Before they board a helicopter to leave the island, Grant decides not to endorse the park, a choice with which Hammond concurs.

Cast

  • Sam Neill as Dr. Alan Grant, a leading paleontologist.
  • Laura Dern as Dr. Ellie Sattler, a paleobotanist.
  • Jeff Goldblum as Dr. Ian Malcolm, a mathematician and chaos theorist.
  • Richard Attenborough as John Hammond, InGen’s billionaire CEO and the park’s creator.
  • Ariana Richards as Alexis “Lex” Murphy, Hammond’s granddaughter.
  • Joseph Mazzello as Timothy “Tim” Murphy, Alexis’ brother and Hammond’s grandson.
  • Martin Ferrero as Donald Gennaro, a lawyer who represents Hammond’s concerned investors.
  • Bob Peck as Robert Muldoon, the park’s game warden.
  • Wayne Knight as Dennis Nedry, the disguntled and corrupt programmer of the park’s computer systems.
  • Samuel L. Jackson as Ray Arnold, the park’s chain-smoking chief engineer.
  • Cameron Thor as Dr. Lewis Dodgson, a man involved with a corporate rival of InGen.
  • Miguel Sandoval as Juanito Rostagno, the Mano de Dios amber mine’s proprietor.
  • Jerry Molen as Dr. Harding, the park’s veterinarian.
  • B. D. Wong as Dr. Henry Wu, the park’s chief geneticist.
  • Richard Kiley as himself, providing audio narration for the park’s main tour.
  • Greg Burson as the voice of Mr. DNA, the animated DNA strand that explains the miracle of cloning.

Dinosaurs on screen[edit]

A life-sized Tyrannosaurus robotic model, with hydraulics where the dinosaur's feet would be, touches a car in a movie set.

 

The life-sized animatronic Tyrannosaurus rex on the set. It is the largest sculpture ever made by Stan Winston Studio.[3]

 

Reconstruction of the stop motion scene of the destroyed car in the National Museum of Cinema of Turin, Italy.

Despite the title of the film referencing the Jurassic period, Brachiosaurus and Dilophosaurus are the only dinosaurs featured that actually lived during that time; the other species featured did not exist until the Cretaceous period.[4] This is acknowledged in the film during a scene where Dr. Grant describes the ferocity of the Velociraptor to a young boy, saying “Try to imagine yourself in the Cretaceous period…”[5]

  • Tyrannosaurus was acknowledged by Spielberg as “the star of the movie”, even leading him to rewrite the ending to feature the T. rex for fear of disappointing the audience.[6] Winston’s animatronic T. rex stood 20 feet (6.1 m), weighed 17,500 pounds (7,900 kg),[7] and was 40 feet (12 m) long.[8] Jack Horner called it “the closest I’ve ever been to a live dinosaur”.[8] While the consulting paleontologists did not have a consensus on the dinosaur’s movement, particularly regarding its running capabilities, animator Steve Williams decided to “throw physics out the window and create a T. rex that moved at sixty miles per hour even though its hollow bones would have busted if it ran that fast”.[9] The major reason was the T. rex chasing a Jeep, a scene that took two months to finish.[10] The dinosaur is depicted with a vision system based on movement, though later studies indicated the T. rex had binocular vision comparable to a bird of prey.[11] Its roar is a baby elephant mixed with atiger and an alligator, and its breath is a whale‘s blow.[10] A dog attacking a rope toy was used for the sounds of the T. rextearing a Gallimimus apart,[6] while cut sequoias crashing to the ground became the sound of the dinosaur’s footsteps.[12]
  • Velociraptor plays a major role in the film. The creature’s depiction is not based on the actual dinosaur genus in question, which itself was significantly smaller. Shortly[13] before Jurassic Park’s theatre release, the similar Utahraptor was discovered, though was proven bigger in appearance than the film’s raptors; this prompted Stan Winston to joke, “We made it, then they discovered it.”[8] For the attack on character Robert Muldoon and some parts of the kitchen scene, the raptors were played by men in suits.[14] Dolphin screams, walruses bellowing, geese hissing,[6] an African crane‘s mating call, tortoises mating, and human rasps were mixed to formulate various raptor sounds.[10][15] Following discoveries made after the film’s release, most paleontologists theorize that dromaeosaurs like Velociraptor and Deinonychus were fully covered with feathers like modern birds. This feature is only included in Jurassic Park III for the male raptors, who are shown with a row of small quills on their heads.[16]
  • Dilophosaurus was also very different from its real-life counterpart, made significantly smaller to make sure audiences did not confuse it with the raptors.[17] Its neck frill and its ability to spit venom are fictitious. Its vocal sounds were made by combining a swan, a hawk, a howler monkey, and arattlesnake.[6] The animatronic model, nicknamed “Spitter” by Stan Winston’s team, was animated by the puppeteers sitting on a trench in the set floor, and used apaintball mechanism to spit the mixture of methacyl and K-Y Jelly that served as venom.[18]
  • Brachiosaurus is the first dinosaur seen by the park’s visitors. It is inaccurately depicted as chewing its food, and standing up on its hind legs to browse among the high tree branches.[10] According to artist Andy Schoneberg, the chewing was done to make the animal seem docile, in a way it resembled a cow chewing its cud. The dinosaur’s head and upper neck was the largest puppet without hydraulics built for the film.[19] Despite scientific evidence of their having limited vocal capabilities, sound designer Gary Rydstrom decided to represent them with whale songs and donkey calls to give them a melodic sense of wonder. Penguins were also recorded to be used in the noises of the dinosaurs.[10]
  • Triceratops has an extended cameo, being sick with an unidentified disease. Its appearance was a particular logistical nightmare for Stan Winston when Spielberg asked to shoot the animatronic of the sick creature earlier than expected.[20] The model, operated by eight puppeteers in the Kaua’i set, wound up being the first dinosaur filmed during production.[21] Winston also created a baby Triceratops for Ariana Richards to ride on, a scene cut from the film for pacing reasons.[22] Gary Rydstrom combined the sound of himself breathing into a cardboard tube with the cows near his workplace at Skywalker Ranch to create the Triceratops vocals.[15]
  • Gallimimus are featured in a stampede scene where one of them is devoured by the Tyrannosaurus. The Gallimimus was the first dinosaur to receive a digital version, being featured in two ILM tests, first as a herd of skeletons and then fully skinned while pursued by the T. rex.[6] Its design was based on ostriches, and to emphasize the birdlike qualities, the animation focused mostly on the herd rather than individual animals.[23] As reference for the dinosaurs’ run, the animators were filmed running at the ILM parking lot, with plastic pipes standing in as the tree that the Gallimimus jump over.[24] The footage even inspired to incorporate an animal falling in its leap as one of the artists crashed making the jump.[25] Horse squeals became the Gallimimus sounds.[15]
  • Parasaurolophus appear in the background during the first encounter with the Brachiosaurus.[26]
  • Alamosaurus appears as a skeleton in the Jurassic Park visitor center.[27]

Production[edit]

Development[edit]

Michael Crichton wearing a suit.

 

Michael Crichton‘s book attracted the attention of director Steven Spielberg even before publishing. The author was also responsible for the film’s first scripts.

Michael Crichton originally conceived a screenplay about a graduate student who recreates a dinosaur; he continued to wrestle with his fascination with dinosaurs and cloning until he began writing the novel Jurassic Park.[28] Even before publication, Steven Spielberglearned of the novel in October 1989 while he and Crichton were discussing a screenplay that would become the television seriesER.[29] Spielberg considered that what really fascinated him was that Jurassic Park was “a really credible look at how dinosaurs might someday be brought back alongside modern mankind”, going beyond a simple monster movie.[21]

Before the book was published, Crichton demanded a non-negotiable fee of $1.5 million as well as a substantial percentage of the gross. Warner Bros. and Tim Burton, Columbia Pictures and Richard Donner, and 20th Century Fox and Joe Dante bid for the rights,[29] but Universal Studios eventually acquired them in May 1990 for Spielberg.[30] After completing Hook, Spielberg wanted to filmSchindler’s List. Music Corporation of America (then Universal Pictures’ parent company) president Sid Sheinberg gave a green light to the film on the condition that Spielberg made Jurassic Park first.[29] The director later declared that by choosing a creature-driven thriller, “I was really just trying to make a good sequel to Jaws, on land.”[31]

To create the dinosaurs, Spielberg at first thought of hiring Bob Gurr, who designed a giant mechanical King Kong for Universal Studios Hollywood‘s King Kong Encounter. Upon considering that the life-sized dinosaurs would be too expensive and not all convincing, Spielberg instead decided to look after the best effects supervisors in Hollywood. Brought in were Stan Winston to create theanimatronic dinosaurs, Phil Tippett to create go motion dinosaurs for long shots credited as Dinosaur Supervisor, Michael Lantieri to supervise the on-set effects, and Dennis Muren of Industrial Light & Magic to do the digital compositing. Paleontologist Jack Hornersupervised the designs, to help fulfill Spielberg’s desire to portray the dinosaurs as animals rather than monsters. This led to the entry of certain concepts about dinosaurs, such as the theory that dinosaurs evolved into birds and had very little in common with lizards. One of the first consequences was the removal of the raptors’ flicking tongues in Tippett’s early animatics,[6] as Horner complained it was implausible.[32] Winston’s department created fully detailed models of the dinosaurs before molding latex skins, which were fitted over complex robotics. Tippett created stop-motion animatics of both the raptors in the kitchen and the Tyrannosaurus attacking the car. But despite go motion’s attempts at motion blurs, Spielberg still found the end results unsatisfactory in terms of working in a live-action feature film. Muren declared to Spielberg that he thought the dinosaurs could be built through computer-generated imagery, and the director asked him to prove it.[6] ILM animators Mark Dippé and Steve Williams developed a computer-generated walk cycle for the T. rex skeleton, and were approved to do more.[33] When Spielberg and Tippett saw an animatic of the T. rex chasing a herd of Gallimimus, Spielberg said, “You’re out of a job,” to which Tippett replied, “Don’t you mean extinct?”[6] Spielberg later wrote both the animatic and his dialogue between him and Tippett into the script, as a conversation between Malcolm and Grant.[34] Although no go motion was used, Tippett and his animators were still used by the production to supervise dinosaur movement. Tippett acted as a consultant regarding dinosaur anatomy, and his stop motion animators were re-trained as computer animators.[6] The animatics made by Tippett’s team were also used along with the storyboards as a reference for what would be shot during the action sequences.[12] ILM’s artists were sent to private tours to the local animal park so they could study large animals — rhinos, elephants, alligators, and giraffes — up close, and also received mime classes for understanding movements.[25]

Writing

Universal paid Crichton a further $500,000 to adapt his own novel,[35] which he had finished by the time Spielberg was filming Hook. Crichton noted that because the book was “fairly long” his script only had about 10 to 20 percent of the novel’s content; scenes were dropped for budgetary and practical reasons, and despite the gory descriptions, the violence was toned down.[36] Malia Scotch Marmo began a script rewrite in October 1991 over a five-month period, merging Ian Malcolm with Alan Grant.[37]

As Spielberg wanted another writer to rework the script, Universal president Casey Silver recommended him David Koepp, co-writer of Death Becomes Her.[38] Koepp started afresh from Marmo’s draft, and used Spielberg’s idea of a cartoon shown to the visitors to remove much of the exposition that fills Crichton’s novel.[39] While Koepp tried to avoid excessive character detail “because whenever they started talking about their personal lives, you couldn’t care less”,[40] he tried to flesh out the characters and make for a more colorful cast, with moments such as Malcolm flirting with Sattler leading to Grant’s jealousy.[21] Some characterizations were changed from the novel. Hammond went from a ruthless businessman to a kindly old man, because Spielberg identified with Hammond’s obsession with showmanship.[41] He also switched the characters of Tim and Lex; in the book, Tim is aged eleven and interested in computers, and Lex is only seven or eight and interested in sports. Spielberg did this because he wanted to work with the younger Joseph Mazzello, and it also allowed him to introduce the sub-plot of Lex’s adolescent crush on Grant.[42] Koepp changed Grant’s relationship with the children, making him hostile to them initially to allow for more character development.[29]

Two scenes from the book were excised, with Spielberg removing the opening sequence with Procompsognathus attacking a young child as he found it too horrific,[43] and Koepp cutting for budgetary reasons the T. rex chasing Grant and the children down a river before being tranquilized by Muldoon. Both parts eventually saw inclusion in the film sequels.[39] Spielberg suggested the addition of the scene where the T. rex pursues a jeep, which at first would only have the characters driving away after listening to the dinosaur’s footsteps.[44]

Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

No 18 highest grossing Film in all time

“Pirates 4” redirects here. For the 3D short film, see Pirates 4-D.
Pirates of the Caribbean:
On Stranger Tides
The film's main character Jack Sparrow stands on a beach. He wears a red bandana, a dark blue vest with a white shirt underneath, and black pants. Attached to his belt are two guns and a scarf. A ship with flaming sails is approaching from the sea. In the background, three mermaids are sitting on a rock. The names of the main actors are seen atop the poster, and the film credits are at the bottom.

Theatrical release poster
Directed by Rob Marshall
Produced by Jerry Bruckheimer
Screenplay by
Based on
Starring
Music by
Cinematography Dariusz Wolski
Edited by
Production
company
Distributed by Walt Disney Studios
Motion Pictures
Release dates
  • May 7, 2011(Anaheim premiere)
  • May 20, 2011(North America)
Running time
137 minutes[1]
Country United States
Language English
Budget $378.5 million[2]
Box office $1.046 billion[3]

Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides (Spanish: “Piratas del Caribe: En Aguas Misteriosas”) is a 2011 American-British-Spanish fantasy swashbuckler film and the fourth installment in the Pirates of the Caribbean film series. It is the first film in the series not to be directed by Gore Verbinski, being replaced by Rob Marshall. Jerry Bruckheimer again served as producer. The film serves as a stand-alone sequel to the previous installments. In the film, which draws its plot from the novel On Stranger Tides byTim Powers, Captain Jack Sparrow (Johnny Depp) is joined by Angelica (Penélope Cruz) in his search for the Fountain of Youth, confronting the infamous pirate Blackbeard (Ian McShane). The film was produced by Walt Disney Pictures and released in the United States on May 20, 2011. It was the first film in the series to be released in the Disney Digital 3-D and IMAX 3D formats.

Writers Ted Elliott and Terry Rossio first learned of Powers’ novel during the back-to-back production of Dead Man’s Chest and At World’s End, and considered it a good starting point for a new movie in the series. Pre-production started after the end of the 2007–2008 Writers Guild of America strike, with Depp collaborating with the writers on the story design. Principal photography rolled for 106 days between June and November 2010, with locations in Hawaii, the United Kingdom, Puerto Rico, and California. Filming employed 3D cameras similar to those used in the production of the 2009 film Avatar, and ten companies were involved with the film’s visual effects. Following inflated production costs it is currently noted as the most expensive film ever made.[2]

On Stranger Tides broke many box office records upon release, and it stands as the 14th highest-grossing film of all time worldwidewhen not adjusting for inflation. Critical reviews were mixed to negative, with the film receiving criticism for its script, excessiveness, and lack of originality. However, positive mentions were given to the action, musical score and visuals.

A sequel, titled Dead Men Tell No Tales, is scheduled to be released on July 7, 2017.

Plot

After a failed attempt to rescue his first mate, Joshamee Gibbs, in London, Captain Jack Sparrow is brought before King George II, who wants Jack to guide an expedition to the Fountain of Youth before King Ferdinand and the Spanish Navy can locate it. Heading the expedition is Jack’s old nemesis, Captain Hector Barbossa, now a privateer in service to the British Navy after losing his leg and ship, the Black Pearl, which he believes to be sunk.

Jack refuses the King’s order and then after successfully evading the King’s Royal Guards, Jack meets with his father, Captain Teague, who warns Jack about the Fountain’s rituals. Jack then finds out that someone is impersonating him to recruit a crew to find the Fountain. He later confronts the impostor and only to find out it was Angelica, Jack’s former lover and the daughter of the ruthless pirate Blackbeard, who practices voodoo magic and wields a magical sword that controls his ship, the Queen Anne’s Revenge. While Jack is shanghaied aboard Blackbeard’s ship, Gibbs narrowly escapes execution by memorizing and destroying Jack’s personal map, forcing Barbossa to spare him so he could navigate to the Fountain.

Meanwhile, after a failed mutiny aboard the Queen Anne’s Revenge, Jack is forced to lead the way to the Fountain. Blackbeard seeks the Fountain’s power to circumvent his predestined fatal encounter with “a one-legged man” (Barbossa) as foretold in a prophecy. During the voyage, Jack learns that he must find two silver chalices, both believed to be found aboard Juan Ponce de León‘s missing flagship, the Santiago. The Fountain’s water must be consumed simultaneously from the two special chalices. Any individual drinking from the chalice containing a mermaid‘s tear has their life extended, while the other dies, their life drained from their body and remaining years ‘donated’ to the other. With Angelica’s help, Jack also learns that the Black Pearl didn’t sink, but that it was shrunk and added to a collection of captured ships in bottles by Blackbeard.

The Queen Anne’s Revenge charts a course for Whitecap Bay – where he hopes to harvest tears from a mermaid. A small boat of pirates is set adrift as bait; led by Tamara, the mermaids obligingly seduce and massacre them. In the ensuing battle Blackbeard captures a mermaid. Philip Swift, a captive missionary, falls in love with the mermaid and names her Syrena. Reaching the unchartered island where Ponce de León’s ship had been stranded, Angelica and Blackbeard coerce Jack into retrieving both chalices. By the time Jack locates the decaying vessel, sitting on the edge of a cliff, he meets with Barbossa, who he finds waiting aboard. However, the two discover a Spanish expedition have claimed the chalices first.

Seemingly wanting to achieve the same goal, Jack and Barbossa sneak into the Spanish camp to steal the chalices. However, it is later revealed that Barbossa was originally waiting aboard the Santiago for Blackbeard. Barbossa declares he is only interested in seeking revenge against Blackbeard for attacking the Black Pearl, which he still believes is sunk, during which he was forced to amputate his own leg to escape. Joining forces, Jack and Barbossa escape the camp with the chalices. Meanwhile, Syrena, reciprocating Philip’s love, is tricked into shedding a tear which Blackbeard collects, leaving her to die. Philip is forced to continue the journey as a hostage. Jack returns with the chalices and Gibbs, with whom he had reunited while assisting Barbossa. Jack and Blackbeard bargain for Angelica’s safety, Jack’s confiscated magical compass, and Gibbs’ release. In return, Jack vows to give Blackbeard the chalices and lead him to the Fountain; Blackbeard agrees and Gibbs departs with the compass.

At the Fountain, Blackbeard’s crew are confronted by Barbossa, causing a vicious skirmish. Subsequently, the Spanish arrive to unexpectedly destroy the Fountain, believing the Fountain’s power to be an abomination against God. During the confusion, Barbossa stabs Blackbeard with his poisoned sword. Angelica pulls the sword out of Blackbeard but is cut and poisoned, too. Barbossa gets ahold of Blackbeard’s magic sword, allowing him to gain control of the Queen Anne’s Revenge and its crew. Philip is also mortally wounded in the melee. Nevertheless, he returns to free Syrena, who retrieves the missing chalices and gives them to Jack, telling him not to waste her tear. Syrena finds Philip, who is dying. Philip asks Syrena for her forgiveness. She kisses him and they disappear underwater together.

With Blackbeard and Angelica both nearing death, Jack brings the chalices to them and tries to convince Angelica to drink from the one with the tear, but Blackbeard grabs it and drinks, asking his daughter to sacrifice herself by drinking from the other one. Angelica agrees. Anticipating that the self-serving Blackbeard would choose to sacrifice his own daughter, Jack has lied about which chalice contains the tear to save both Angelica’s life and Blackbeard’s soul. Angelica’s wounds are healed while the Fountain consumes Blackbeard’s body, killing him. Although Angelica claims to be in love with Jack, he remains uneasy about her intentions and leaves her stranded on a cay barefoot with a pistol containing one shot. Angelica fires the shot at Jack as he rows away, but misses. Now wielding Blackbeard’s magical sword, Barbossa absconds with the Queen Anne’s Revenge, having returned to piracy and happily sailing to Tortuga with his new crew.

Jack finds Gibbs, who had used his compass to locate the Revenge and reclaim the shrunken Black Pearl and the armada of other conquered ships in bottles in a gunny sack. Hoping to find a way to revert the Black Pearl to its original size, the two head off into the sunset, determined to continue their pirate life.

In a post-credits scene, a voodoo doll of Jack crafted by Blackbeard washes ashore and is claimed by a grinning Angelica.

Cast

Production

Development

Shortly before the premiere of At World’s End, Jerry Bruckheimer stated it was the end of the trilogy, but the idea of a spin-off was still possible.[4] After the film’s successful opening weekend, Dick Cook, then Chairman of the Walt Disney Studios, said he was interested in a fourth installment. The Los Angeles Times also reported that rights to a book were bought.[5] Ted Elliott and Terry Rossio had started working on a script in 2007, but they were interrupted by the 2007–2008 Writers Guild of America strike, and only resumed in mid-2008.[6] On September 24, 2008, during a Disney event at the Kodak Theater, Cook and Johnny Depp, in full Captain Jack Sparrow costume, announced that a fourth Pirates film was in development.[7]

In June 2009, Bruckheimer indicated Disney would prefer the fourth installment of Pirates to be released before The Lone Ranger film, which he, Johnny Depp, Ted Elliott, andTerry Rossio had been working on for release on May 20, 2011. He hoped Gore Verbinski would return to direct the fourth film, as his BioShock film adaptation had been put on hold.[8] As Verbinski was unavailable due to his commitment with Rango the same year, Bruckheimer suggested Rob Marshall, who he considered a “premiere filmmaker”, stating that “Every film [Marshall] made I thought was unique and different.”[9] On July 21, 2009, Marshall accepted the job, because of the “whole new story line and set of characters. It felt new, and that was important to me.”[6] Marshall said the film provided him a long-awaited opportunity to work with Depp, and that his directing was helped by past experience as a choreographer—”the action sequences felt like big production numbers.”[10] On September 11, 2009, at Disney’s D23 convention, the title was announced as Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides.[11] Marshall visited the Pirates of the Caribbean ride in Disneyland for inspiration, eventually paying homage with a skeleton holding a magnifying glass in Ponce de León’s ship. An appearance of “Old Bill”, the pirate who tries to share his rum with a cat, was also filmed but cut.[12] Pintel and Ragetti were originally supposed to make an appearance, but director Rob Marshall opted out of the idea as he feared their roles would be cut.[13]

Cook resigned in September 2009 after working for Disney for over 38 years.[14] Depp’s faith in Pirates of the Caribbean: On Stranger Tides was somewhat shaken after the resignation, with Depp explaining that “There’s a fissure, a crack in my enthusiasm at the moment. It was all born in that office”.[15] Depp also explained Cook was one of the few who accepted his portrayal of Jack Sparrow: “When things went a little sideways on the first Pirates movie and others at the studio were less than enthusiastic about my interpretation of the character, Dick was there from the first moment. He trusted me”.[15]

No 17 highest grossing Film in all time

Toy Story 3

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
This article is about the film. For the game based on the film, see Toy Story 3: The Video Game.
Toy Story 3
All of the toys packed close together, holding up a large numeral 3, with Buzz, who is putting a friendly arm around Woody's shoulder, and Woody holding the top of the 3.

Theatrical release poster
Directed by Lee Unkrich
Produced by Darla K. Anderson
Screenplay by Michael Arndt
Story by
Starring
Music by Randy Newman
Cinematography
  • Jeremy Lasky
  • Kim White
Edited by Ken Schretzmann
Production
companies
Distributed by Walt Disney Studios
Motion Pictures
Release dates
Running time
103 minutes[1]
Country United States
Language English
Budget $200 million[1]
Box office $1.063 billion[1]

Toy Story 3 is a 2010 American 3D computer-animated comedy-drama film, and the third installment in the Toy Story series.[2] It was produced by Pixar Animation Studios and released by Walt Disney Pictures. Directed by Lee Unkrich, the screenplay was written by Michael Arndt, while Unkrich wrote the story along with John Lasseter and Andrew Stanton, respectively director and co-writer of the first two films. The film was released worldwide from June through October[3] in the Disney Digital 3-D, RealD, andIMAX 3D formats. Toy Story 3 was the first film to be released theatrically with Dolby Surround 7.1 sound.[4]

The plot focuses on the toys Woody, Buzz Lightyear, and their friends dealing with an uncertain future as their owner, Andy, prepares to leave for college. The film features an ensemble voice cast with Tom Hanks, Tim Allen, Joan Cusack, Don Rickles,Wallace Shawn, John Ratzenberger, Estelle Harris, Jodi Benson, and John Morris reprising their roles from the previous films, andNed Beatty, Michael Keaton, Whoopi Goldberg, Blake Clark (replacing Jim Varney), Timothy Dalton, Kristen Schaal, Bonnie Hunt, and Jeff Garlin joining the returning cast.

Toy Story 3 became the second Pixar film (after Up before it) and third animated film overall (after Beauty and the